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Freedom of Information Release 


On 

Subject: Nikola Tesla 


File #: 100-2237 
Pages Reviewed -160 
Pages Released -160 



Federal Bureau of Investigation 


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reehawken,'; E. J. , 9/24/40. 


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Department of Justice, 
Atten. Ur* 0. Edgar Hoover, 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Ur. Hoover * 


mi information contained 

IN IS UNCLASSIFIED, 



\ 


The appended article was printed in ths^JTew York Times issue of Sunda 
September 22, 1940 and if based on proven facts .should be of vital importance to our 
War Department as well^ as to that of other nations now controlled oy insane dietators. 

It ,as the author states, the teleforee has oeen perfected by Nikola "Tee la, it 
would bs a measure of fore aigktedn ess to insure his constant guarding against his belt 
molested .possibly kidnapped and tortured, by alien, enemies for the purpose of seizing 
the secret of such an invaluable instrument of war and/or defense 


^ The foregoing is offered just in ease the article amd its inferences have not 

S been called to your attest ion* 


Very truly yours 





■ ry^/y* 7 

‘‘Death Ray*' for Planes 

Nikola jfTesla, one of tha truly 
great inventors who celebrated his 


eighty-fomh birthday on July 10, 
tells the!! writer that ha stands 
r^ady to'cdlvulge to the United 
States Government the secret of hia 
* teleforce. " with which, he said, 
ah-plane motors would ba melted at 
a distance of 250 miles, so that an 
Invisible Chinese Wall of Defense 
would be built around the country 
• against any attempted attack by an 
I enemy air force, no matter how 
1 large. 

j This "teleforce," ha said, Is based 
j on an entirely new principle of 
j physics that "no one has ever 
dreamed about,’* different fropi the 
principle embodied in his inventions 
relating to the transmission of elec- 
trical power from a distance, for 
which he has received & number of 
basic patents. This new type of 
force, Mr. Tesla said, would oper- 
! ate through a beam one one-hun- 
dred-millionth of a square centi- 
meter in diameter, and could be 
generated fronj a special plant that 
would cost no more than $2,000,000 
and would take only about three 
months to construct. 

A dozen such plants, located at 
strategic points along the coast, ac- 
cording to Mr. Tesla, would be 
enough to defend the country 
against all possible aerial attack. 
The beam wo*ld melt any engine, 
whether Diesel or gasoline-driven, 
and would also ignite the explosives 
aboard any bomber. No possible 
defense against it could be devised, 
he asserts, as the beam wpdld be 
j all-penetrating. 

~ High Vacuum Eliminated 

! * The beam, he states, involves fou^ 
new Inventions, two of which al- 
ready have been tested. On# of 
2 these is a method and apparatus 


Tor , producing rays 1 1 ; Vther 

^manifestations- of er ' 
ieJr, eliminating- the i .^faii/ Tor a 
high vacuum; a aecond is a method 
and process for producing "very 
great electrical force"; the third 
Is a method for amplifying this 
force, and the fourth is a new 
method for producing "a tremen- 
dous electrical repelling force." 
This would be the projector, or 
gun, of the system. The voltage 
for propelling the beam to its objec- 
tive. according to tbe inventor, 
will attain a potential of 50,000,000 
volts. 2 

With this enormous voltage, he 
said, microscopic electrical parti- 
cles of matter will be catapulted on 
their nlission of defensive, destruc- 
tion. He has been working on this 
invention, he added, for many years 
and has recently made a number of 
improvements in It. 

Mr. Tesla makes one Important ' 
stipulation. Should the government 
decide to take up his offer he would 
go to work at once, but they would . 
have to trust him. He would suf- 
fer "no interference from experts." 

In ordinary times such a condi- 
tion would very likely interpose an 
insuperable obstacle. But times be- 
ing what they are, and with the 
nation getting ready to spend bil- 
lions for national defense, at the 
same time taking In consideration 
the reputation of Mr. Tesla as an 
inventor who always was many 
years ahead of his time, the ques- 
tion arises whether it may not be 
advisable to take Mr. Tesla at his 
word and commission him to go 
ahead with the construction of his 
teleforce plant. 

Such a Device “Invalualrfe** 

After all, $2,000,000 would he rela- 
tively a very small sum compared 
with what it at stake. If Mr. Tesla 
really fulfills his promise the re- 
sult achieved would be truly stag- 
gering. Not only would it save bil- 
lions now planned for air defense, 
by making the country absolutely 
impregnable against any air attack, 
but it would also save many more 
billiona in property that would 
otherwise be surely destroyed no 
matter how strong the defenses are 
as witness current events in Eng- 
land. 

Take, for example, the Panama 
Canal. No matter how strong the 
defenses, a suicide squadron of dive 
bombers, according to some ex- 
perts, might succeed In getting 
through and cause such damage 
that would make the Canal un- 
usable, in which case our Navy 
might find itself bottled up. 

Considering the probabilities in 
the case even if the chances were 
100,000 to 1 against Mr. Tesla the 
odds would still be largely in favor 
of taking a chance on spending 
$2,000,000. In the opinion of the 
writer, who has known Mr. Teela 
for many years and can testify that 
4ie still retains full intellectual 
ivi gor, the authorities in charge of 
DTOftsjg the national defense should 
at once look into the matter. The 
sum J? insignificant compared with 
the magnitude of tbe stake. 

. 4 - 

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RECORDED 

& 


EKT:ZU 

100-2237-1 


October 1, 1940 



E1C 


I wish to acknowledge 
letter dated September 24, 1940, 
enclosure. 


jLu 

I tfwmi 


Lpt of your 
together with Its 


lour ooartesy and interest in bringing 
this information to my attention are indeed 
appreciated, and you may be assured your letter 
will receive appropriate consideration. 


Sincerely yours. 


.John Idgar Hoover 
Director 


•r. Tele** 
lr. Cteu 
If. K. A. 
lr. 

Ir. 


11 1 INFORMATION contained 
’ ‘-""IN IS UNCLASSIFIED^ 

' TE 7-^-J?. BY- 


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COMMUNICATIONS SECTION 
M A I ! . F D 

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FBI NYC 

DIRECTOR 

VEST 


1- 12-43 


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JAN^2 1943 


n-' T *'" 1 v LW 

V ^ l‘U V w 


11-06 PM 



E BUREAU 


UNSUBS — EQUIPMENT, EXPERIMENTS AND /RESEARCH OF NIKOLA TE; 
ceased, -mamm espi onage - w. retel /Under above heading to 
FROM THIS OFFICtlSATED JAN NINE LAST* INQUIRY DEVELOPS THAT TESLA DIED 
JAN EIGHT, RATHER THAN THURSDAY, JAN SEVEN, AS SMHBRK STATED IN 
REFERENCE TELETYPE* ON THE NIGHT OF JAN EIGHT, SAVA^KOSANOVICH, GEORGE 
*CLARK, AND KENNETH^SWEEZEY VISITED TESLA-S HOTEL W I Tif A ' REPRESENTATIVE 
OF SHAW WALKER CO. IN ORDER TO OPEN THE SAFE IN THE ROOM OF TESLA. 
KOSANOVICH LATER REPORTED TO WALTER GORSUCH, OFFICE OF ALIEN PROPERTY 
CUSTODIAN, NYC, THAT HE WENT INTO THE ROOM IN ORDER TO SEARCH FOR A 
WILL OF TESLA. KOSANOVICH AND THE OTHERS MADE THE SEARCH OF THE SAFE 
IN THE PRESENCE OF THREE ASST MANAGERS OF HOTEL NEW YORKER AS WELL AS 
REPRESENTATIVES OF THE YUGOSLAVIAN CONSULATE, IDENTITIES OF LATTER NOT 
YET KNOWN. AFTER THE SAFE WAS OPENED, SWEEZEY, TOOK FROM THE SAFE A 
BOOK CONTAINING TESTIMONIALS SENT TO TESLA ON THE OCCASION OF HIS SEVEN- 
TY FIFTH BIRTHDAY. THIS BOOK WAS ARRANGED FOR TESLA BY SWEEZEY. 
KOSANOVICH TOOK FROM THE ROOM THREE PICTURES OF TESLA, TWO BEING EN- 
LARGED NEWSPAPER PICTUREX. ACCORDING TO MANAGERS OF HOTEL AND KOSANO- 
VICH HIMSELF, NOTHING ELSE WAS REMOVED FROM THE ROOM OR SAFE. THE 
SAFE WAS THEN CLOSED UNDER A NEW COMBINATION, WHICH COMBINATION IS 
NOV IN POSSESSION 09OMBBC KOSANOVICH. ON SATURDAY AFTERNOON, JAN 
NINE^GORSUCH AND maBEX FTIZGERALD OF ALIEN PROPERTY CONTROL WENT TO 
HOTEL ’AND SEIZED ALL THE PROPERTY OF TESLA, CONSISTING OF ABOUT fWO 
TRUCKLOANDS OF MATERIAL, SEALED ALL ARTICLES AND TRANSFERRED THEM TO 
THE MANHATTAN STORAGE AND WAREHOUSE CO. NY, WHERE THEY ARE NOW LOCATED. 
AT THAT Tmm TIME THERE WERE ALSO IN THIS WAREHOUSE APPROXIMATELY 
THIRTY BARRELS AND BUNDLES BELONGING TO TESLA WHICH HAD BEEN THERE SINCi. 
ABOUT NINETEEN THIRTY FOUR. THESE HAVE ALSO -MMMX BEEN SEALED AND 
ARE NOW UNDER ORDERS OF ALIEN PROPERTTOUSTODIAN. IN VIEW OF FACT TESLA 
IS A US NATURALIZED CITIZEN, ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN FEELS THAT ITS 
JURISDICTION OVER PROPERTY IS DOUBTFUL BUT MOHR FEELS THAT NO OTHER '7 
AGENCY WILL BE ABLE, TO GET TO THIS PROPERTY FOR AT LEAST TWO DAYS/ 

copies ■ 

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PAGE TWO 

AFTER THAT TIME IT IS POSSIBLE THAT A PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR WILL BE 
APPOINTED FOR THE PROPERTY WHO MAY TAKE THE PROPERTyiNTO HIS CUS- ' 

TODY. TESLA ALSO HAD SOME PROPERTY, AMCeBMBEK ALLEGED BY INFORMANT 
FITZGERALD IN THIS CASE, TO BE A WORKING MODEL OF AN INVENTION IN 
A SAFE DEPOSIT BOX IN GOVERNOR CLINTON HOTEL IN NY. INQUIRY SHOWS 
THAT THIS WAS PLACED HERE BY TESLA IN NINETEEN THIRTY TWO AS SECURITY . 
FOR FOUR HUNDRED DOLLARS OWED HOTEL. THIS BILL IS STILL OWED AND HOTEL 
APPEARS UNWILLING TO RELEASE THIS PROPERTY TO ANYONE AT LEAST UNTIL* 
MBMCX DEBT IS PAID, BUT THIS OFFICE WILL BE ADVISED IF ANYONE ATTEMPTS 
TO PAY BILL AND OBTAIN PROPERTY. CONCERNING TESLA HOTEL MANAGERS RE- 
PORT HE WAS vmm C VERY ECCENTRIC IF NOT MBEK MENTALLY DERANGED DURING 
PAST TEN YEARS AND IT IS DOUBTFUL IF HE HAS CREATED ANYTHING OF VALUE 
DURING THAT TIME, ALTHOPRIOR TO THAT HE PROBABLY WAS A VERY BRILLIANT 
INVENTOR. THEREFORE, ANY NOTES OF VALUE WERE PROBABLY THOSE MADE 
PRIOR TO THAT TIME. KOSANOVICH IS A NEPHEW OF TESLA WHO DESCRIBED 
HIMSELF AS FORMERLY QUOTE YUGOSLAV MINISTER OF STATE UNQUOTE AND NOW 
QUOTE NESMOTRC PRESIDENT OF EASTERN AND CENTRAL PLANNING BOARD REP- 
RESENTING YUGOSLOVI A, CZECHOSLOVAKIA, POLAND AND -GREECE, UNQUOTE. 

SWEEZEY IS A WRITER FOR POPULAR MECHANICS AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS WHO 
IS WX DESIROUS OF PUBLISHING A BIOGRAPHY OF TESLA AND THERFORE WOULD 
LIKE TO OBTAIN CONTROL OF HIS NOTES FOR THIS WORK. CLARK IS EMPLOYED 
BY RCA AND WOULD ALSOPROVIDE STORAGE ROOM FOR TESLAS EFFECTS IN ORDER 
TO USE THEM IN WRITING A BIOGRAPHY. TESLA AT ONE TIME REPORTED TO BE 
WORKING ON EXPERIMENTS FOR YUGOSLAVIAN GOVERNMENT IN EXILE. IT IS 
DESIRED THAT BUREAU ADVISE IMMEDIATELY WHETHER IT IS INTERESTED FURTHER 
IN THIS PROPERTY FOR PURPOSES OF TAKING CONTROL OF IT. SUGGEST THAT, 

IN VIEW OF FACT THAT THE NOTES AND OTHER MATERIAL WOULD BE HIGHLY TECH- 
NICAL IN CHARACTER AND FOR THAT REASON mm COULD NOT BE REVIEWED Wf 
jm EXCEPT BY A TRAINED PERSON THE OFFICE OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH DEVEL- 


OPMENT MIGHT BE INTERESTED. 

FOXWORTH 

END NYC S2 WHS 

HOLD WA R 2 RSG 



RC6ACT10MS CM "TVt I S PAQB 
Ak. E MOT FOIA LET I OVL-S 






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JW El NY C 
[DIRECTOR 
COAT 

unknown 


1-9-43 


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JECTS • 


TESLA, DECEASED. ESPIONA 


STANDING SCIENTISTS 
TEEN FORTY THREE AT 
LIFETIME, 
TRANSMISSION 0 
THE DEATH RAY. 



IN THE ELECTRICAL FIELD, 

THE HOTEL NEW YORKER, 

CONDUCTED MANY EXPERIMENTS IN' oon: 

OF ELECTRICAL POWER 

ACCORDING TO INFORMATION FURNISHLi 


THREE SIX FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY, THE NOTES M 
EXPERIMENTS AND FORMULAE TOGETHER WITH DESIGNS OF 
VITA1.T7F THEM ARE AMONG TESLAS PERSONAL 
TAKEN TO PRESERVE THEM OR TO KEEP THEM FROM FALLIN( 

UNFRIENDLY TO THE WAR EFFORT OF THE UNJ 
ING TO SPANEL, A DISTANT RELATIVE OF TESLA, NAMED 
WAS INTENSELY DISLIKED BY TESLA, IS TAKING STEPS T( 

THESE IMPORTANT DOCUMNTS AND PLANS. SPANEL BELIEVI 
STRONG LIKELIHOOD THAT KOSAKOVICK WILL MAKE THIS MATERIAL 
TO THE ENEMY. "'S PANEL ADVISED G TWO HEADQUARTERS IN WASHINGTON, AS 
WELL AS MR KORKIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IN WASHINGTON, CONCEDING 
THE ABOVE. SPANEL WAS ALSO INTELEPHCMIC COMMUNICATION WITH DR D 

LOZA 

't: 


E ONi. 
LAS 
Y Tu 
FEE N 
i^PEfiPLl 
"0CZ ORD-i 
WHO / 
SESSION OF 
HERE IS A 
AVAILABLE TO 


, ONE OF THE ADVISORS TO 
, AND LOZADO TOLD SPANEL 
INTERESTED IN THE EFFECTS OF TESLA 
IN DOING ALL HE COULD TO PRZSZRVZ 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER WHO HAD BEEN QUITE 
TIME, ADVISED THE NEW YORK OFFICE THAT 

FORTY THREE, SAVA KGSANOVICH, GEORGE CLARK, WHO IS IN CHARGE 
EUM AND LABORATORY FOR RCA, AND KENNETH SWEZEY OF ONE 

IN THE NEW 

THE ASSISTANCE OF A 
MAD IKK IS ROOMS IN WHICH 
IMPORTANT 


VICE PRESIDENT WALLACE CONCERNING THIS 
THAT THE GOVERNMENT WAS VITALLY 
REQUESTED SPANEL TO LOSE NO TIME 
THEM. ELOYCE FITZGERALD. AN 
CLOSE TO TESLA DURING HIS LIFE __ 
JANUARY SEVENTH, 


NINETEEN 

r Tur 


, i r. , 


THE WIRELESS 
PERFECTED. 


M»C_ 

SIX THREE MILTON 
TO TESLAS ROOMS IN THE NEW YORKER, AND WITH 

LOCKSMITH BROKE INTO A SAFE WHICH TZSLm , 
HE KEPT SOME CF HIS VALUABLE PAPERS, INCLUDING (J\ 
ELECTRICAL FORMULAE, DESIGNS, ET CETERA. WITHIN THE 
TESLA TOLD FIT2GERAL£ T HAT HIS EXPERIMENTS IN CONNECTION WI*n 
TRANSMISSION OF, .ELECTRICAL POWER HAD BEEN COMPLETED ANDggd.osnP* 


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ARY TYFE OF TOR 
IT IS FIT2GERALD 
TO ANY NATION UP 
GEARLD EY TESLA 
AND EXPLANATION 
THE PERSONAL EFF 
MODEL OF TESLAS 
A SAFETY 
CLINTON 
HAS TO DO WITH T 
ELECTRICAL CURRE 
THAT HE HAS SOME 
TRANSCRIPTS AND 
BUREAU IS REQUES 
EE TAKEN CONCERN 


THATTESLA HAS CONCEIV 
HICH IS NOT PRESENTLY 
IEF THAT THIS DESIGN H 
HE PRESENT TIME. FROM 
S THAT THE COMPLET 
SIC THEORIES OF TH 
ESLA . HE ALSO KNO 
T MORE THAN TEN TH 
SIT BOX BELONGING 
ND PflHHln; FITZ 
LEDE DEATH RAY OR 
A HAS ALSO TOLD FI 
GHTY TRUNKS 

ING TO DO WITH EXP 
VISE IMMEDIATELY W 
MATTER BY THE NEW 
FOXWORTH 


ND 
SE 
OT 

TATEM 
PLANS 
E THI 
HAT 
ND 

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ARL 
FFE 
ENT 
IF 
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, REVOLUTION- 
THE NAT I 
AVAILABL 
TO FITZ- 
CATIONS 
OWE PLACE IN 
A WORKING 
BUILD IN 
OVERNOR 
HIS MODEL 


CORRECTION- THRO 
IS 
SF 


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piES DESTROYED 


- TKThTN "RiDG^R HOOVER 

' DIRECTOR 


k\g-287 Mr. Tolson_ 



IFrficral tLuirrau of {uursttga 
Uttitcft -§tatca Drpartmcnt of 3 
Slasljutgtort, SJ. <ZL 


JPLsed 




January 13, 194 3 



Mr. E.A. Tamnq 

Mr. Clegg 

Mr. Glavin 

Mr. Ladd 

Mr. Nichols 

Mr. Rosen 

Mr . Tracy_ 

Mr. Carson^ 

Mr. Coffey^ 

Mr . Hendon 


MEMORANDUM FO 


DT? • 


UNKNOWN SVPJFC 
EXFu?JiL w !?TS A 
OF NIKOLA TES: 
ESPIONAGE'- ‘t 


I' 

‘ l 

Nikola Tesla, one of the world’s outsta- 
the electrical field, died at his residence in the 
York City, on January 7> 1943* In the course, of 

many experiments with respect to the transmission 1 

of radio and what is commonly celled the>^eaih Ray^V. JJBV el 
respect to the wireless transmission of electrical gp^fer^ere 
hee.c co? pie ted and perfected, and Tesla had also coiii^ived anic 
revolutionary type of torpedo which is not in use bj " ^ 

tine. The specifications, exclamations of the basi^ 
of Tesla’s scientific endeavors a~e reported to be effects 

reported to have some 80 trunks in different daces ^ontainirr 



ic navir 


do with his exo°rin°r ts rs we 1 1 as a working model of one of 


his de^e longer ts in t.v.c sefet*< r deoosjt box at the Governor Clinton Hotel. 


wYw 

<“::r.in?er w o 


Information c once min r/Tesla 1 s experimentf^^^j^t^en reported to the 
fork Office bp A, NJ Spanel And Bloyca Fitzgerald, the latter an electrical 
had been ophite close to Tesla. Eoth of these individuals have 
indicated that r.o steps have been taken to preserve Tesla’s records and models 
or to keep tner from Celling into the hands of individuals sympathetic to the 
Axis cowers. 


Tesla has a distant relative by the name of SavajKosanovich, whom he 
c/ intensely disliked. Kosanovich is reported to be taking s^eps to get possession 
of these important documents and plans, and Span el believes there is a strong 
likelihood that Kosanovich will make such information available to the enemy. 

On January 7, 1943, Hosanovioh, accompanied .by George \Clark, in charge of tre * 
iruseum and Laboratory for RCA, and Kenneth -ewe zey of Vrooklyn, New York, entered 
Tesla’s rooms at the Hotel New Yorker where, with the aid of a locksmith, t> 
broke into a safe in which Tesla kept some of papers, i^ol Jtdinj? 

important electrical formulae, designs, et cetera. £ t)t 3 

INDEXED 

lir. Spanel, in addition to reporting these developments ^ the Bureau, 
hes also advised the headquarters of the Military Intelligence Division, a hr. 

Vo r kin of trie Department of Justice in Washington, e:i qpr. JAN I ol£ol943e 
of the advisors to Vice Fresiden 4- Tallace. Lczado advised Spanel tha ^ 
Government was vitally interested in the effects of "’esl a and requ 
Spanel loose no time in doing all he could to piyser ^e-t hem 


S!h-J 


J.p 2 1 ~ 5' 





/- /*> 






t JOK. _i3« R HOOVER 
" ' OIR? ►TOR 



i ~ •* *n 


EAT:DS 


iFeberal Surcau of Inuestigation 
Mttitrb States Department of iJustire 
ISaehingtan, D. QL 

January 12, 1943 

MEMORANDUM FOR i/fl. LADD 



Mr. 

To 1 s on 

Mr . 

E. A. Tamin_ 

Mr. 

ClegE 

Mr. 

Glavin 

Mr . 

Ladd 

Mr. 

Nichols 

Mr. 

Rosen 

Mr. 

Tracy 

Mr. 

Carson 

Mr. 

Cof f ey 

Mr. 

Hendon 

Mr. 

Kramer 

Mr . 

McGui re 

Mr. 

Harbo 

Mr. 

Quinn Tamm 

Tele 

. Room 

Mr. 

Nease 

Miss 

Beahm 

(Miss 



On Friday, January 8th, Ur. L. M. C. Smith called me 
in connection with the death of Ntkol^^esfa . He ad 
vised me that he was concerned about the possibili 
of enemy agents confiscating some of the trunks o, 

Tesla , who had died on January 7th. He understood 'Wlat 
the War Department was interested in this matter and 
that apparently the Alien Property Custodian's office 
was tkking some action. He desired to know whether the 
Bureau would take some steps to refrain relatives of Tesla 
from taking the contents of his trunks and whether the 
Bureau would seize possession of the trunks. Ur. Smith 
indicated that he was talking to the Alien Property Custodian 
along the same lines. I told him that in view of the fact 
he was going to handle the matter with the Alien Property 












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■ been recetvedsmd i Matt W.larwii ay ,; ; $£- "% 

ctatten.to you for having w&mten waempou ; ;#' 
d<4* J*# effects Sf JnckeJo^TesIa mere handled £ 

>p iJW Office of Alt** rr epe rtpt W« : "‘^r.-v 

Bttrpos* 2 t is suggested yen nap demtrs. tr Pl 1 ■- 
Kimfeot* o<t& tA# Of fie* SfAlten Preper tm, :s 
United States Department of Justice 0 201 Indiana 
Avenue 9 Washtngton 0 X>« C* 

, pours, . • 





f^Jshn Edgar Bower V>" 

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■y*£L' yy ’■ & : r - .v^ 

JfOTEf This individual requests infoYmatt on relot tve ■ 
to the work of Jickola Tesla relative to electrical 
experiments he mas conducting, which JSfwatn under- >.:: 
stands were taken m:tk% s-M0mn and held far security 
reasons * Bureau reflects that the effects 

of Tesla were handled byCths Office, Sfll ien Property* 


JpjS&tr •$&«*>. 

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APR 1948 p.M.| 

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Director, FBI 

SAC, New York 


April 17, 1950 


( 


; 




SAVA K. K0SAS0VIC 
h?tt:i3cal secukiti-tu 
( fiufile 65-47953) 


Rebulet dated April 3 last. 

On April 7, 1950 agents of this cffloe interviewed Mr* J.V* POTS, 

Tins President of the Manhattan Warehouse and Storage Coapany, $2nd Street 
It 7th Avenue, Rev Xoik City, sad at that ties Mt* POTS advised that the 
rules of his flm required that all persons gaining access to goods stored 
by Manhattan first had to fill out sn appropriate fora sotting forth their 
nsaea, date of visit, and reason for requesting acosss to the goo da* 

In & revise oa the file pertaining to the storage of tbs effects of 
WJJTLA TESLA, SCi» POTTS revealed that only one such visit had been aade by 
persons outside of the a&nageasnt of Msnhattan Storage itself* This one ' ' 

occasslon took place on January 26 and 27, 1943, at which tine representatives - 

of the Alien Property Custodian aade a through review of the entire effects 
cl- the TBSU /V t k0 L h \ e^ L fa 

The TESIA effects are stored in roam 5J and 5 L of Manhattan Storage 'a 
warehouse at 52nd Street k 7th Avenue, Mew Tork City* MR* MICHAEL ERG* who 
stated ha had been Floor Supervisor for approximately 10 yeare on the floor 
in question, stated that he oould recall only the one oc cession in early 1943 
wher. an examination was aade of the TESLA effects* Be stated that at that 
tine onerous photographs were taken fay the examiners* Bis description of 
the eq ilpnent used would tend to show that s microfilm reproduction was aade 
of acae of the pepers of the deceased scientist* ML* HWO added that several 
of the group waking the examination wore U*S* Bsvy uniforms, and during tbs 
two days required to ooetplste the examl nstlcn tbs civil isn assistants In tbs 
group were identified to him only as "PULE PAL AUTHORITIES** According to MR* 

CKO, no other instance of nicrof lining of the records of tbs TESLA estate has 
taken place sin oe that time* 

' ! 

It should be noted that the Bureau was informed of tbs examination men- 
tioned above by Hew fork latter (with attachments) dated October 17, 1945 9 
entitled UN KNOBS SUBJECT; SAVA IDSAMOVICHj Experiments k Research of MIKOLA 
TESLA (Dueceased), Espionage-M* 


cci 65-12290 





^5thecoroeo 

148 m 2 $ •- 


fcPHiJJC 

105-1391 


ORIGINAL FILED IN ( 



Letter to Director, FBI 
HI 105-1391 


\4 

i ' 


UR. POTTS stated that no inquiry had been received by Manhattan from 
SAVA N. HDSANOVICH, nor had Manhattan infonaed his, in any way, that an ex- 
amination of the TESLA effects had been made by anyone. In fact, added MR. 
POTTS, the only correspondence relating to the TESLA estate haa been in the 
form of bills for storage. 

)£. POTTS stated that any personal inquires regarding the estate would 
of neoeeeity be directed to him, and to date no such Inquiries have been made. 

Interviewing agents explained to MR. POTTS that the examination made, 
as mentioned above, was not instigated by the Bureau, nor had the Bureau taken 
part in that examination. 

Unless advised to the contrary, this investigation is being placed in 
a closed status, and no further investigative action is contemplated by this 
office. CIOSED. 



- 2 - 




Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Department of Records 
Washington, D. C. 

Gentlemen: 



In a manner of introduction, I wish to state that I am working 
toward a degree in Electrical Engineering at the Institute of 
Technology of the University of Minnesota. 


For several years, I have been engaged in a study of extensive 
compass and detail concerning the researches a,nd writings of 
the late, world renowned scientist, Dr. Nikola JTejs la. At con- 
siderable expense , I have acquired an extensive collection of 
materials relating to Dr. Tesla and his ’.forks which include: 

l) Personal letters written by Tesla to his close friend. 



2) Numerous periodicals, some of which are to be found In 
only a few libraries throughout the United States. 

3) A few rare books which have now become "collector's 
items" . 

4) A collection of issued patents. 

Although the items listed are considerable in number, the spe- 
cific information desired is lacking. 

As I understand it, because of the nature of Dr. Tesla's role 
in scientific developments, all research papers, patent 
applications, etc., were secured by the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation at the time of Dr. Tesla's death in January of 
1943 . 


The purpose of this seizure, as described in numerous articles, 
was to determine whether these papers contained suggestions 
leading toward advancements in the field of science. 


£*f>W 


s 


ri 


RECORDED - 


68 


/- 


f 





t: 


A 



m ■!■■! nmnr 


MS' 





if 



Now It seems tnat sufficient tine has elapsed for an inves- 
tigation of this kind. If Dr. Tesla's Estate has been released 
by the department in charge, any records that can be made 
available for examination will be welcomed. 

A letter from Harold I. Baynton, Assistant Attorney General, 
Director, 0: f ice of Allen Property, Informed me that the Library 
of Congress listed Certain works, writings and research studies 
prepared oy the late Dr. Tesla. However, a letter addressed 
to the Library failed to bring results as the Library "has no 
f i le 8 on the researches of Tesla". 

A similar result was obtained from the Bureau of Naval Research 
and the Department of Commerce. 

I am especially interested in the research work in which Tesla 
was engaged in his later years. There are various unpublished 
works, such as a 10-page typewritten statement presented in 
1937 at a meeting of several well-known editors outlining his 
discoveries and giving a resume 1 of his work in the fields of 
gravity and cosmic ray research, etc. Also, Tesla prepared 
various papers, one of which was In effort to secure the Pierre 
Gutzman Prize from the Institute of France. My inquiry is in 
effort to determine whether any of these documents, as well as 
others, are at this time available. 

I will greatly appreciate any information in regard to any 
records which you may have. 




— "un run tt ' 


M — ■ I MUIII 


August 26, 1952 



With r/f trance to your letter of 
August 16, 1952, our files disclose that 
the effects of Nikola Tesla to ere taken into 
custody at the time of his death by the 
Office of Alien Property , and not by this 
Bureau . Consequently, you may wish to 
communicate further with that agency, which 
may be addressed as follows: (65-47953) 

Assistant Attorney General 
Rowland T. Kirks 

Director, Office of Alien Property 
United States Department of Justice 
101 Indiana Avenue, N . If. 

Washington 25, D. C. 

Sincerely yours. 


i tfohn Edgar Hoover 
lT. Director 




cc - 1 - Assistant Atti^wty^fieneral (with copy of/ 
Rowland f, Kirks inconwig) 

Director? -Off ice of Alien Property ' ^ 
United States Department of Justice 
101 Indiana Avenue, N. .. _ „ 

Washington 25, D. C. ' *' ^ 

"'A id 


PJCtawy 


■4 


/ . 

\ \ NOTE: 

\j Scr iu 1&2: 


A/ * \ '> 


100-2237 ■ ■ ' • '' 

No reference Bureau files on correspondent 
in Minnesota. . 6-22-52. . .pe 





Office MepfO/andum • united states government 


TO 


FROM l 


f OBJECT : 




. l>. 


DATE: May 5 , 1253 


L. 


urtnpi.. 


NIKOLA TESLA (Deceased) 

x nfc u •/:. ou conch:-.: ing 


/ 

• ITIFORMATIO:! contained 

•T.tA! P r.r>\\ 


Standards 
cf Kay 4, 1953 . 



- - -!? t IO I ; ' ! I r i 

to U.,uL t .Jii 


Tolsoo 

JyfeZ 

Brlmoni _1— 



Glavin 

Harbo 

Rosen 

Tracy 

Gcarty 

Mohr 

¥ioterro»d — 
Tele. Room 

Holloman 

Stroo - 


0 rdnance Sec 
x Tension 622) celled on the afternoon 




"Thf^PrcHTi 
Q' Neill, whom 
rk newspaper 
book that Bureau 



that he had been reading a book entitled, 
- The Life of Nikola Tesla ' by John J . 


took over. 

277 . U r J 

power engines 
A . C. generator , 
feats . 7: r e inquired 



tated 
ejifus 

| described as a science wr^£^^^^r a New 
isher - Ives l.ashburn ), in this 

Agents went to Tesla's ro orn f^Tfiming his death 
on January 7, 1943, opened b.is s^^^examined his papers, and 

rsonal files . ■said this appeared on page 

stated that Tesj^^^s the father of modern 

being responsible for the invention of the 
notor transmission, and other electrical engineeri : 

rs and works of Tesla were in 


9y 


CD 


zu e 
r Q r 


j / O O L, O 

r^vi V) 


Sion c 
in v\ 


rie 


th 
Sl'rCGLL, 
t'leir sc 


>9 


:•(: 


gn) (2) i. 


C 


I told K r 
taking Tesla's fil^s 
check on the matter. 



thai 

not 


(Cut 

: the 
seer. 


i c imvor 


voerc 
ic nee . 


. e :• available 


statement concerning the Bureau's 
very logical but that I would 


The 

of Tesla in 
Sava Kosano 
entered his 
which he po 
the Denar tv. 
possibil ity 
Tesla and a 
taking some 
being handl 
did not m a k 


Bureau's files reflect that shortly after the death 
his hotel room in New York City on January 7, 1943 , 
vichf a distant relative, and other ■ individuals 
room and opened the safe, examining certain materials 

r? . fin .Tr. rm m* P 7 Q£P. }/r*. T. JC 


I u u in u/iu uj;c/»cu c u t mj ijkji oll i, u //iUt/cr/ 

ssessed . On January 8, 1943, Nr. L. N. C . Smith of 
ent advised Nr. Tamm that he was concerned about the 
of enemy agents confiscating some of the trunks of 
pparently the Office of Alien Property Custodian was J ^ 
action regarding these effects • Since the matter wds / (T 
ed ft; the Office of Alien Property Custodian, the iffreau 
e any inquiries into this situation. (65-47952 t -6y 

It is noted also thai ^h^hui^ai^^c^wed 
teril N r 

[Milwaukee , Wisconsin, was sty. ay VI 

m ecTrTco.l encine erinn at the Milwaukee School of Enaineer ing and 

too XX, 

. r /— ' ! 

LLL;mer / 

r rp _ ry o 




V/ , 


J “ If K 


r- Nichols 

:<J ^ 


'srsi® 





was interested in the life and works of Tesla. Uptcted 

that he understood at the time Of Tesl&'s death eau 

took his manuscripts and experiment d(^b^f^z national security . 
x he Bureau on April 22, 1548, adv ised^BKMBthai the effects of 
Tesla were handled by the Office of Aj^^^^^overty and not by the 
FBI. (65-47553-18) 

I called is morning and told him that it was 

the office of Alien Frm^^y and not the FBI which took over the 
effects ofTesla following his death. Accordingly, I suggested 
that }' ght wish to communicate with the office of 
Alien for further inf or mat . on concerning this matter. 


The book prodigal Genius - The Life o v 
is not in the Bureau Library. A copy is being 
the Library of Congress. It will be examined 


’ Nikola Tesla :l 
o bia ined from 


KIC 


papers. 
Tu rt er 


■ determine 

ih>e re. Terence made to the Bureau's taking these 
At th. 3 t time a determination can be made as to what 
action should be taken. 


ej 


,7 



AFDENDUlf: LLLjmsr 5-14-53 

Page 277 of the "Prodigal Genius - The Life of Nikola Tesla," 
describing Tesla's death, contains the following statement: 
"Operatives from the Federal Bureau of I nvesti gati on came and opened 
the safe in his room and took the papers it contained, to examine 
them for a reported important secret invention of possible use 
in the war. " 


Since this work was published 
that any particular purpose would 
with the publishers at this time, 
the question, has been set straigh 
action is being takei . 


m 


M i 

I 


1944, it is not felt 

d by raising an objection 
the individual who raised 
here/ ore, no further 



_ o _ 


Office Mr-'torandum • ukiti ■ . tes government 


TO : Oi-Srectc-’y, fB I 


DATE: /"I; \ 

rl .., r • r .^£0 '""rfNlWXEb 

^from : s^c, ‘ 


SUBJECT: 


hr. GiCIDI H. SCrl 


,TP 



<** 


y / 

, - v ^w^fcord Ecp4, . Uejr Itochell e , Ker York, 

advised that he received t\-o letters frca LEL^2 >^"jIM)JS 5GK , 127 Seymou r 
Avenue Southeast, Minneapolis, Minnesota, photostat'id ^bg^es of t&ich are 
heiUfc furnished the bureau and Minneapolis. 

*• vr -./O 

* •,>* -*• , V/ 

hr . SCHZZFF stated that he was an associ&te. ^.,1ff , . jlIKClA in £f_ 

19 and that for many years his father had been If private secretary. 
Mr. SCHSSiT said that he never heard of IZLA'T I. A* 15&S8S 3b* did he ever 
hear of ary of the nazes aientioned in AITSKSX'S letter* 


:'x . Sdh-rkJ' stated that he has quite a hit of S tvri tings 

ir. his possession and he didn't znov whether cr not tE'ey wohld be of value 
to a fore igr. c cv e r rune nt . ftV ■■.■%'-■■■'■ i 

Jt 

*, rA?; 

Mr .*-._*_ ’ is an Z nhia eer^yith Consolidate'* IdiSou 'iSwW¥t>rlsv : 

# £o;.ulie^^is:”-' - T tc kin _ . he • 

o the of the r truer author! . i?r, i Jov< 

— * * • ~ 

- - f • / • N / 

Mr. C.'h-_1 stated that Lf . there, was scything wrong *Atfc thjsf ^erl c- — 
J- ttr- -.1 he •- be witihrvj cs oc&pze'&te. with the «FBI. ‘v 





's' 


Vct&rihcr aclio/o is beta£ Ta&en bj r the C£fica v t$£B. 



BEST COPY AVAILABLE 


I 


ITT 


Lcland I. Anderson 
127 Seymour Avenue Southeast 
Minneapolis 14, Minnesota 


February 3 , 1954 


Mr. George K. Scherff, Jr. 

149 Seacord Road 
Wes tones ter, Nil* YORK 

Dear Mr. Scherff; 

re. : The LiTe and work of Dr. Mikola Tesla. 

Recently, I have founded an organization in name and honor of 
Dr. Tesla in cooperation with several people who were intimately 
associated with Tesla during his lifetime, and wltn otners who 
are interested in Dr. Tesla and his achievements from a scien- 
tific and historical standpoint. (See enclosed brochure.) I 
nave had some difficulty locating a few of Tesla's associates, 
and, the name of George Scherff is among them. Therefore, it 
Is my sincere hope that you . Mr. Scherff, are the person I seek 
as having been associated with Tesla. 

I have personally studied the works of Tesla for a number of 
years, being particularly Interested in elaborating upon his 
researches regarding high-tension radiant beams. Through some 
travel and otr.er efforts, I nave been fortunate to locate many 
original collections of Tesla's correspondence and manuscripts, 
and in a few cases obtained a number of interesting items. 

I was In New York a snort time ago on ousiness, and while there 
I visited Mr. Kenneth X. Swezey. Re Intends to undertake some 
significant work on oenaif of Tesla In tne near future, and 
since ne knew Tesla for ao.ui&ny. years during his • i^ter life, 

'it will be handled with great understanding. 

I hope that you may have some Interest In the work wnlch I 
have initiated on be naif of Dr. Tesla. There are many matters 
that I wisn to discuss with you, provided of course, that you 
are the Mr. Scherff related to the Tesla story. I would-be 
most nappy to near from you at your earliest convenience, and 
will send you all publications of the organization If you wish 
to receive tr.em. 




( 

Very truly yours, 


__ A-INILHNAIIUNAL 

University Station, 8ox 135 \\kB 
^ MINNEAPOLIS • 14 • MINNESOTA™ 


To Those Who Are Interested In the Life and Work of 

Dh- NIKOLA TESLA 




Following the death of Dr. Nikola Tesla on the ?th of J enua- r, IjmN, 
Mr. John J. O’Neill, former Science Editor of the Ne-v York Hera? '. Tribune, 

PRODIGAL GENIUS 
The Life of Nikola Tesla 

- a memorable tribute to one of the most outstanding figures in the en- 
tire field of electrical science.. Many reading this biography learned 
of Nikola T&3la for the first time, despite his monument cue achievements 
with which he has von world- wide acclaim in scientific circles Even 
those closely associated with the fields cf science and engineering dis- 
covered a remarkable story not generally known of the brilliant genius 
Tesla whoso sensitive personality and seclusion kept his fame in a shadow 

The TESLA- INTERNATIONAL organization is being established in the 
United States in name and amor of Dr, Nikola Tesla by those g earing a 
mutual interest In his life and works. The organization has as it 3 
cbjeotlvo the promulgation cf the truth about Nikola Tesla; that a full 
recognition be made for his unparalleled research work on the f feet a 
of currents of high frequency and high potential, and for his achieve- 
ments In the realms of polyphase p over transmission and telecommunicate on . 
It would be the duty of the organ! cation to do all in its power that the 
name of Tesla win in the ey-s of the nation the fame de serving of a tru. y 
great American for his contributions to science, industry, and to this 
country. 


A journal of the TEf 
nlng the month of November, 
historical interest related 

A formal roster of all 
organization arid wish '. 

An opportunity of ec.l 
through the medium of 


1/ tf- 
tc 


AT J ON Ah organisation was Issued begin- 
In addition to I te r . 3 of rec nt ar.a 
la, tne journal will include 


vjr.c, h»ve an Interest In the 
T .e in its activities 


. - x, xa 


1 

Jo 


r.:~zizt :x 


cr v.ri! r.al 




A comprehensive bibi: o :rn..r.lcel listing of all available „t -me 
concerning Tesla, wh.ico would include a cataloging cf the various 
collections of Tesliana net generally known Such a listen: will 
be of particular importance to rcrolars in the research field.' 

A presentation of hlth-rtc ur published writings and analytes of 
Tesla s technical research st ..dier as they become available. 


The Journal of the TESLA- INTERNATIONAL organization will oe forth- 
coming at intervals of If - 2 months- Subscription rate is SI. CO for 
10 Issues. Membership in the TESLA- INTERNATIONAL organization 3.3 con- 
current with subscription to the Journal. 


.... • • I 

urmrir m fa I IMBUT ' 




—m — am ■ i imnr 


> 




Lcland I. Anderson 
127 Seymour Avenue Southeast 
Minneapolis 14, Minnesota 



February 12, 1953 


Dear Mr. Scherff, 

It was so very rewarding to receive your reply concerning Dr. Nikola 
Tesla... I have initiated an undertaking on be naif of Tesla because 
I feel that in all right and Justice something should be done to 
perpetuate the name of Tesla and see to it tnat ais name no comes a 
part of the heritage of this nation. A great task per:.a?s, but as 
time goes on I oelleve the name of Tesla wlu.1 become more significant 
in scientific developments. I hope that you may have an interest in 
the organization which I :*ave proposed and established, and I will 
be honored to have you as a member. The organization la presently 
set up on the basis of tnose having a mutuux Interest in Tesia, with 
a free exchange of information between members. Tne first two issues 
of the Journal of tne organization are being s--al to you undm separate 
cover, ana snould reach you in a day or two. 

Some other members which may be of Interest to you are; Muriel arbus, 
Dorotny Skerrltt, Kenneth Swezey and Vv. W. WIinelm. The recent c-.eaths 
of John O'Neill and Edwin Armstrong were very unexpected, arid it is 
with a great sadness tnat I received the news anc. loss of those two 
members. 

Do you know if Mr. Lowenstlen nad a daughter? The reason I ask is 
that a woman visited Mr. O'Neill Defcre his aeath and tuld nim that 
sne inherited a groat amount of Tesiiuna fro.:, nor fatner - wnom I pre- 
sume to be Mr. Lowenstlen. Tnls woman was a: raid of disclosing tne 
information by reason of her mistaken notion and fear tnat she wou.d 
rudely be raided by the army. You see Mr. O'Neill related to nor 
tnat a few army officials visited his noma w*.tn insistent requests 
for information. Of course ail tnis sort of government interest was 
aroused by Tesla's "Death-Ray" rumors , piayec up oy enterprising 
journalists. Well, tne result of rIi >. his is that she refused to 
give Mr. O'Neill her married name — only that she mar. -led a biamese 
prince no less, and moved to some mid-western city. If tnis woman 
has tne amount of material tnat Mr. O'Neill intimated, it wouxd cer- 
tainly be important to locate her. 

I believe that one of tne valuable efforts of tne Tes organization 
would be to catalog every piece of information concerning IV s . I 
have mane a oeglnning effort along tnis line, ana I no >6 tnat oefore 
too long all collections of Tesliana nay be Located, cataloged, and 
reproduced for fear of eventual loss. Through Mary A. Benjamin (of 
Walter R. Eenjamln Autographs in New York) I nave obtained a number 
of significant items of correspondence oetw- n Tesla and Robert U. 
Johnson. Tne entire collection of correspondence with Mr. Johnson 
numbers in excess of 70 pieces. I snare tnis collection with Mrs. 



Lcland I. Anderson 
127 Seymour Avenue Southeast 
Minneapolis H, Minnesota 

- 2 - 


Jar.es a. .Ye Che s.oey of Long Island. The period of tnls correspondence 
runs iron Ib^-iSOG. Mrs. KcChesr.ey has ar.otr.er group of correspondence 
between Tesla and Seorge Sylvester Vie reck wnlcn Is very interesting 
In t.nat it is from a period later in T-sla's -ife. (If you wish to 
r r solve any nr.otostatic copies iron these cel -rctio.-.s I will he happy 
to s- r.d tne.t to you.) 


1 Interested to learn w .mother you have co.iected any mementoes, 
corresnond r.ee, writings, etc. of Tesla. For a long wni le I nave 
been tr.-lr.t' to .ocate a copy of tr.e brochure which Tesla Issued the 
first week of F-: oru&ry , 19C4. It carr.e in a large square envelope 
searing a .arge red wax seal with tr.e initials "i.'.T." stamped thereon, 
jyuite a number of tr.e .7. were distributed throughout Yew York and 


. sewn- r 




the Tesla enterprise in an effort to secure financial 


backing for tr.e tower and power plant erected at V.ardenclyf fe , Long 
Island. You no douot knew of tne brochure of which I speak. I 
thought it would be interesting to reproduce tr.is brochure ana dis- 
tribute it among tne members of tne Tesla organization as a memento. 
A.tr.ougn I nave written and Inquired about this broenure extensively, 
I nave not been able to locate a copy. Did you ever, have one? 

I have hopes that in 195o (The Tesla Centenary) some significant 
observance may ee organized here in t;.e United States in honor of 
Tesla. Tne Tesla Museum in Yugoslavia has CDtair.c-d tne Tesla 
Inheritance, wnlcn amounts to 3 tons of apparatus , writings , etc. 

It is tne intention (so stated) of the Museum to publish the entire 
writings of Tos.a, including tr.ose in tne inheritance, on the Tesla 
Centenary. I don't know what sort of oclitical propaganda might 
sc injected in tr.is pus . icatlop , out it cccured to me that it may 
be a o moorin'*"' 

1 ■ s . a 1 s ur. - 

' o c 


;e to arrange an advance publication in this country 
;nou:;l is.v-d works. Unfortunately , there is not much, to 
-t. While the Tesla estate remained in this country, 
near xy ev. ry important paper in tne estate were made 
of ..rip-nt Fie id Devo.opmcnt Center in Onio. If these 


o.notos 


ts coup: 


located there would be mucr. materi 


wornir.*: 


. .. . . catl on . 

of a file on Tc 
extensive search thus far. 


ax :or a 


;;.e Library of Congress in 


. ; j w over , i r. 

oaraticn of a file on Tcs.a, tnese photostats have escaped the 


Hoping tr.at you may oe interested in the efforts of the ,TLSLA- 


. .-..nr... : O’.AL on behalf of Tesla 

4 ^ T ru *t* 

* U | ^ rX ... , 


and wls.n to associate yourself with 


Yours faithfully , 

) 



^Itesla-internationa^I 

•Jn : .'srs'*y Station, Be/ 135 
MINNEAPOLIS • 14 • MINNESOTA 


IMrOHTAtiT AliKCUNCKMEKT 


To Members of the TESLA- 1 NYilRNATIONAL organization 
and those ince.ested In the works or 
Dr Nil: ole. Teola 


K«hK mdi;: ick_ . .r. 

*Tnc Invent lore ;vj Writings o f Nik o la TeBla rt 

h,y 

••■-.&£ CoAmerferd Martin 


Tr-iourb s-J 

* 


o J 


• LJ .oh - 

• h S Cl 




. It is with great pleasure tha 
ILL organization announces the reprint 
l. : ciuoicai 11 teraturo. 


•-•eng ri'or. _:ylr.-i< 
or-, ire sar.'y - * 
boo/ 1 c Kht 10! . 
iLMj Lv th is 


L-gy 

supply 
r c r c I'f' 


.e .T.cit Inprrfent and significant work 
v o or Tesla, a groat demand ror this 
Tvilg ;TLD L D 1C?. O N IS S3.tiC.yLX 

1 offer will net be repi-ated. when the 


’*••* d 




de-jirl: 
.r o.ipt l v . 


ig a copy of the book are 


Cost of this took 

ri?.£V:5iJTr. f ;:,v *he ro 
ffTe nTe "of \ he ILL 1 i 


the- s pe o la I pr 1 r. t i r.g rate is only 
ip. htp„/' Uj? lte^_ States to me mbers 
organ! zatl on , 


$h.CO 

and 








) 






SAC , Rev York 

^ =H- & - 


MarchlO, 1$5% 



3 - 


Mc4- o-r\ 
F o | A/ 


Director, FBI 

/ac - tf-XS 

ISLA1D I. A1GER80H 

MI8CSLU1BCUS; H3SBRAL SBCOBISX - YU 


r 


Reurlet 2*19-9% concerning the «Ww ca ytloosd Individual, 
Bclrt forwarded to the Bureau tno Photostats of two letters 
which were received tsd nade miUble to joar eCfloe hjr O oorgs l« 
Beherff, Jr, 

e ^ * 

There la returned herewith ene ee| of the Photostats received 
by the Bureau as enclosures with you r letter l n s sn u ch as it 
this set was intended for retention In your office file. 


ils set 

AtQ&LnX 

ETB:aas 








\ 

4 


Tolsoe 

Ladd 

Nichols 

Belmonl 

Cleg* 

Glavin 

Harbo 

Rosen 

Trscy 

Gearty 

Mohr 

Winterrowd — 
Tele. Room _ 

Holloman 

Miss Gsndy — 





MAILED 16 

MAf? 1 0 1954 

COmM-PB! 


y\ 


-i 


JH 






KENNETH M.SWEZE 1 


* 


/ 


I i 


,r% TMATION CONTAINED 
!' IS UNCLASSIFIJ 

TE 7-3-ro R' 

Mr. J. Edgar Hoover 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Washington, D.C. 

Dear Mr. Hoover: 




163 Milton 

Brooklyn 22 , ■ ?!*•. la! ' ,!a ™ 
June 25, 



Tele. Iiof*m 

Mr. Ho!l- ni:m .... 


Miss Gandy 




-../I 





t) * r s 


Back in 1943, the local Alien Property 
Custodian searched through .fche belongings of the late 
electrical inventor, Nikol g -Tesl a. stored in the Manhattan 
Storage Warehouse in "Hew *ork City. Tesla had been a 
naturalized American for more than fifty years, so I 
believe that the search was made on the grounds that the 
property was to be sent to Yugoslavia, through Tesla's 
nephew and heir, lir. Sava Kosanovic (Mr. Kosanovic had 
been Minister of State under the King's government, later 
became Ambassador to the Onited States from the present 
government, and is now a Minister serving in Belgrade) . 


According to the attorney who handled the 
Tesla estate, Mr. Philipyfittenber g . the Alien Property 
Custodian assured him that nothing had been held. I have 
a letter from the Office 6f Alien Property, dated March 
15, 1955, which confirms this statement. 

In gathering material to help in a 
nation-wide commemoration of Tesla's hundredth birthday 

next year which will be participated in by leading 

scientific and engineering societies, museums, and 

universities I have just discovered, however, that 

Tesla's solid gold Edison Medal somehow vanished during 
that search. 


As a friend who had known Tesla well 
during his last twenty years, I was with Mr. Kosanovic im fl 
Tesla's room in the Hotel New Yorker on the day he died/^O 
A safe expert was called in to unlock Tesla's safe. Among 
its contents were several honorary degrees, a volume of 
greetings which I had gathered for him on his seventy-fifth 
birthday, a bunch of keys, and the Edison Medal. We kept 
out the book of greetings (I mentioned this at the time 
to the assistant manager of the hotel and later to a Mr. 

/ t Gorsuch of the Alien Property Custodian' s office), but 
( lV-7 everything else, including the medal and the keys, was 
J I replaced and the safe was lo%^^. RECORDED - 8? / £4 


Except when it 


Ws 


the 


A 


Property Custodian, the safe was never reopened anjjjjl 

. e~/. — ^ 'ffi. 


. .1. f ■ 

6 T JL". 


1 1 1955 


ySyJ ' 

" 33J ft' 27 1955 


» iMnr/ 



an. /ed in Belgrade (where Tes- .'s property was to be 
installed in a special Tesla Museum) and was there opened 
by Mr. Kosanovic. According to his former secretary, both 
the bunch of keys and the medal were missing. The keys 
were later found in a tin box outside the safe; the medal 
was never found. 




I learned of the disappearance of the medal only by 
accident. Mr. Kosanovicf had asked his former secretary 
to get permission from the American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers (who gave Tesla the Medal) to have it duplicated. 
This was given, but the cost, it turned out, would be about 
four hundred dollars. In the meantime, the Tesla Museum, 
in Yugoslavia, is quietly trying to raise the money to pay 
for it. 



The irony of this situation is more disturbing than 
the money involved. By giving us a system which made 

electric power universally available, Tesla probably 

more than any other one man helped put America on top of 

the world. At the time he died, his gold Edison Medal 
was the only material evidence left of this country’s 
appreciation. That this last token should have disappeared 

to have to be replaced by his materially poor countrymen 

overseas for whom he had done nothing seems a tragic 

denotement. / . 'tT^TW- 






/ * * 
* A \ * — 


John^'NeiJI, in y his biography of Tesla, states that 
the FBI broke into Tesla’s safe on the day he died, and 
an article in the current (June) Coronet repeats this. I 
know this isn't true. I did hear, however, that the FBI 
somehow lent a hand to the Alien Property Custodian during 
the latter’s search in the warehouse. 


\ 

w 


If that is so, I thought that perhaps some of your men 
might remember the conditions under which the search was 
made and therefore might have a suggestion as to what could 
have happened to the medal. After this long time, I have 
no hope that the medal can actually be restored, and I am 
already trying to interest Americans in making a replacement 
But future biographers might be spared a lot of wild guessin, 
and wrong blaming if some hint could be obtained as to 

whether the original got lost, strayed, or stolen and who 

might have been responsible. 


With best regards and sincere appreciation for any help 
you can give, 


Sincerely, 

N-'X v 

Kenneth M^Swezey ^ - 

P.S.: I am enclosing an editorial from last month’s POV/ER 

magazine which outlines Tesla’s contribution to the electric 
power industry. 


i< - S . 


LOUIS N ROWLEY, EDITOR ♦ MAY 19S5 • ESTABLISHED 1882 


Power 


Strange Genius 


A sk any croup of power men to name those who laid 
the foundation for today’s electrical generation and 
distribution. You’ll wind up with an impressive list — 
Edison, Brush, Thomson, Westinghouse, many others. 
But there is almost sure to be a significant omission. 

Yet this forgotten man conceived the polyphase ac mo- 
tor — still basic — and devised a suitable system of gen- 
eration and distribution for applying it. To grasp the 
magnitude of this contribution, we must turn back to the 
1880’s when the electrical era was being born, and the 
“battle of the systems” held sway. 

Arc lights and motors were being operated on constant- 
current series systems. Edison’s Pearl Street generating 
station had opened in 1882, supplying incandescent lamps 
and, later, dc motors on a constant-potential system. Un- 
der the leadership of Westinghouse and Stanley, the 
advantages of ac distribution were demonstrated. But 
there was no successful ac motor. 

In May, 1888, a young Yugo-Slav engineer, but four 
years in the United States, read a paper before the Amer- 
ican Institute of Electrical Engineers. In it he described 
a new ac system. Its heart was the induction motor with 
its basic and beautiful concept of the rotating magnetic 
field. The man was Nikola Tesla, the system he described 
was destined to sweep the field. 

With characteristic vision, George Westinghouse real- 
ized the fundamental importance of the polyphase ac 
system and acquired the basic patents. Its first impact on 
the general public was at the Chicago World’s Fair of 
1893. There a 2-phase generator supplied motors and 
lamps, and, through rotary converters and motor-gen- 
erators, a variety of dc equipment. 

-- - * — O O . i 'w o 

N W E 




But it remained for the Niagara Falls power project to 
demonstrate in the most dramatic way possible that poly- 
phase ac was the system of the future. Since 1886 when 
a charter to develop its power had been granted, the eyes 
of the world had been on Niagara. An international com- 
mission, headed by Lord Kelvin, had reviewed 17 pro- 
posals, found none acceptable. Later, just five years after 
Tesla’s AIEE paper, it was officially decided to use the 
polyphase system. 

In August, 1895, Niagara power was delivered to the 
first industrial customer and in 1896 ac transmission to 
Buffalo, 22 miles away, was begun. By that time, the 
steam turbine had been introduced in America and the 
modern age of electric power had truly opened. 

For Nikola Tesla, these far-reaching inventions were 
but a beginning. Still to come was. brilliant work in high 
frequencies, thinking basic to much of today’s radio art. 
Yet by the time of his death in 1943, both he and his 
work had begun to slip into obscurity. Why? 

A man of flashing insights and enormous brilliance, 
Tesla was largely indifferent to the development of his 
ideas. This he left to others while he followed the lure 
of new challenges. In later years, his projects became 
more grandiose, his ways more mysterious, his pronounce- 
ments more Olympian. And working alone, as he did, 
he formed none of the institutional ties that help to per- 
petuate a record of accomplishment. 

Next year — July 10, 1956 — will be the 100th anniver- 
sary of Nikola Tesla’s birth. It would be fitting for our 
engineering societies to commemorate this occasion, to 
acknowledge our debt to this strange and lonely genius 
who changed our world for the better. 


/JO 


7 


(REPRINTED BI PERMISSION) 


AM.EPM KAHCKM *"• 




THE AMERICAN. SRBOBR AN 

J 

Second Class Mail Privilege* Authorized at Pittsburgh, Pa. 


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PsbIUhed Daily Except Sat**. Sunday* and Holiday* by SERB NATIONAL FEDERATION j 
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MILAN M. KARLO, Editor English Section 


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le $4.00 per Year. 


Pyxonacn oe ae spansjy hhkomo. — Oraaoa ce miaaajy ynanpeA. 


RECOGNITION FOR TESLA - 

Largely thru a young American engineer’s efforts, the 
world today is re-scannin^jhe record and achievements of our 
inventive genius, Nikola Tesla . Of late, even the big-tirtie 
magazines have devoted space to the amazing career and fas- 
cinating character of the pioneering electrical wizard. -r mMCH 

The man behind this belated recognition for the one-time Cv3^ - 
Serbian immigrant boy who made millions but died almost a ^ \^Q / 

pauper is Leland J > T"^n^ersQn. head of the Tesla Society, ' v / 
which has headquarters at the University of Minnesota. ^ 

Thru travels, correspondence and detailed research, Mr. 

Anderson has dug up many friends of the late genius and in- 
duced them to join in his noble work. A good many of these 
are American-Serbians. They serve Mr. Anderson and he 
serves them, with information issue'd thru his TESL1AN pub- 
lication. This is, at present, a mimeographed publication issued 
monthly which casts new light on the known life and record 
of the late Dr. Tesla. 

The latest issue (March-June) informs of progress plans ^ 

to honor Dr. Tesla even more. It also presents an account of a - 

fascinating editorial, “Strange Genius”, by the POWER mag- 
azine of the powerful McGraw-Hill publishing line. This edi- INDEXED-59 
torial traces the introduction of Dr. Tesla’s polyphase systenu ✓ , 7 7 ' / 4 

described by Mr. Anderson, as the “most tremendous event inK — — 

all engineering history. iV -c 

Editorialis t Louis Ny^Bowler, according to the TESL1AN. ^ 

answers the perplexing question why, in view of Tesla’s im- __ 

portant discoveries, he fell short of the comparative popularity 

won by Edison and Bell. Then in closing,* he suggests: “It 

would be fitting for our engineering societies, in commemora- oDnnppAW 

lion of the 100th anniversary of JNikola Tesla’s birth (July 10, SKBOBRAM 

1*956), to acknowledge our debt to this strange and lonely , ! , p^rme-rr-|« 

genius who changed our world for the better.". * bUrgb > 

This appears to be just what Mr. Anderson was waiting ; 

for. For now, in the same issue of his TESLIAN, he has pre- 
pared a form to petition Postmaster General Arthur E. Sum- 
merfield to issue a Tesla commemorative stamp next year. J 
jV , t4j* jn this issue and 

w^ lirge fell our readers to endorse it W\th ‘their ^si^atrites: Bend 
! Jyj ccbntjpleVH pe’iWv' V 


answers 


*s burgh, Pennsylvania 






( 


Jj; 


<-«. ^ ^ t 

Office 'M.emc indum • united sif tes government 


TO 


« L. V. BOARDMAN 


from t A% E ' BK 


ESLA 


P 


DATS: June 29, 1955 


AIL INFORMATION CCTASfJO.: 


t-i I 


tUBJBCT : N I ZOLA TEi. 

I MISCELLANEOUS - 


D /». rr 
< i I L 


IS UNCLAS 
l-a-rt B 


INFORMATION CONCERNING 



Tolson 

Ssjuga' 

Belmbni / 

Harbo L 

Mohr 

Parsons 

Rosen 

Tamm 

Sizoo 

linrerrowd _ 
Tele. Room _ 

Holloman 

Gandy 




Nikola Tesla, a native of Yugoslavia , was a famous electrical 
inventor who died in New York City in 1943 where he had lived for many 
years. In attached letter to Bureau dated 6-25-55 Kenneth M. Swezey, 
Brooklyn , New York, advises he is gathering material to help in a 
nation-wide commemoration of Tesla's hundredth birth anniversary in ' 
1956. Swezey ’relates he was present when Tesla 's safe was opened by 
friends after .his death and advises the contents were thereafter 
replaced and'^then impounded by the United States Alien Property 
Custodian . Later the safe was removed to Belgrade , Yugoslavia, to be 
installed inTli Tesla Museum. Missing from Tesla's effects is a gold 
Edison medal he had been awarded. Swezey is seeking to locate the 
medal and has been advised by the Office of Alien Property ( OAP ) that 
OAP held none of Tesla's property. Swezey states he has heard, the 
FBI assisted OAP in handling Tesla's effects while in storage, and 
accordingly, he asks whether Bureau could assist him in locating the 
I Edison medal . Re FBI's assistance to OAP Swezey mentions that in the 
Tesla biography ("The Prodigal Genius" - 1944) by John O'Neill it 
was stated FBI broke into Tesla's safe the day he died (1-8-43 to 
protect contents from enemy hands ) . Swezey notes thi3 same comment 
appears in article ("The Genius Who Walked Alone") by Alfred H. Sinks 
in the June, 1955, "Coronet ." Swezey says he knows FBI did not do this. 
\\ Bufii'SS not pertinent re Swezey. Bureau did not enter into Tesla 
safe matter upon Department's advice it was being handled by OAP • 

Bureau previously aware of comment in O'Neill '3 book. Per p » files 
Sinks was officer of American Civil Liberties Union in 1930-40; staff 
member of Communist l*ne newspaper "The AnviL" 1933-37; member of 

an Writers ‘"CUA repor&~1944) ; close f~isnd of 
reported CP member and suppejsJied underground membef - 



■a it 


micr 


inks 

procedure 


requested for his use as author data re Bureau's 
Was advised no such data available for publication . 


Enclosure^W^C^~ ^ ‘ ^ 

100-2237 

cc - 1 - 65-47953 
Ticklers - Mr. Bird 

Mr. Belmont 
.a M r. Boardman 
ETB : jaa/£ ' 

( s ) I ,/ •' 

C;. JUL lTl&S5. !r 


o -XiT 


I HL!-. 


t:; ;r 1 


RECOROm - w 
£y > 






■ — "mum t 


Memorandum For Mr. Boardman 


RECOMMEND A TION : 

That the attached letter be sent to Stoesey advising Bureau 
did not participate in the handling of Tesla's effects and that the 
matter was handled by OAF. Therefore , Bureau unable to be of 
assistance; that no action be taken relative to Sinks' comment in 
"Coronet" article. 



2 - 


, - ... Belmont 

''■fr. Boardmari 



June 30, 1 955 


Mr % Kenneth H.^Zve se y 
163 Milton Str eet 
Brooklyn MBW Tvrk 


Dear Mr . Smeeey: 


- • i 


INFORMATION CONTAINED 

;FJ.M IS UNCI' 


(Original ^ 



/ 


Jit* reference to your letter of Junf)25, 
1955, our filet ditolote the effects of Jirt»ajQ ( ~Tg»Ja 
mere taken into custody after hie death by the Office 
of Alien Property and not by this Bureau . 

Since toe did not participate in the 
handling of Mr . Tesla* s effects, me are unable to 
supply the information you requested . 

Sincerely yours , 




Tolsoc _ 
Board m*o 
Nichols _ 
Belnoof . 

Hu bo 


Paraoo 
Rosea 
Taan . 


Stzoo 

Yiaterrowd _ 
Tele. Room . 

Hollos* n 

Gaady 


J * £d « a ^ Hoover 

- /co -< 2 q £ 7 - 6 / 

John Edgar Hoover 

RECORDED - 
INDEXED - 2t 


^3 B4 JUL 1 1955 J 
\JMob Belmont to^- B o a 



MOTE: 

A cover Memorandum 1 _ 

was prepared by ETB:jaa on 6-29-5S Tit connectTon with 
this outgoing suiil. v 

Bufiles contain no derogatory data- r>,e coiyjes- 
pondent; reflect only that he was close frier tcPapgP 
j admirer of Tesla. 

, . J / J« .v ^ 

‘ ETStjda/^ 

r(s) J i 

* r 


'j-v 


64'1"- 


8 ^&l 



l- 


& 


V 




August 1, 1955. 


Mr. J. ndgar Hoover, 

FedersJ. bureau of Investigation, 
V.'a shing ton , D . C . 




Lear ^r. Hoover: 


o 

In his book, ’’Prodigal C-enius", The Life of Hikola Tesla, ^r. hohn 
J O’Neil says, on page £77, that the F.B.I. went to "Tesla’s hotel 
room, opened his steel safe and removed from it, the papers it 
contained. 

Has there ever any publication of what these papers contained? If 
so, could you inform me where I might obtain a copy of such 
publication? 

If there was no publication of the Safe’s content, after more than 

10 years, would it be improper to publish them? 

If there was no publication of the safe’s content, but there were 

no particular secrets found there in, could you inform me -where I 
might learn what the safe contained? 


Any information on this matter will be appreciated. 
Thanh you for your trouble. 





K- 


u -mm 

J 

* (BWOWi 


/0O-Q. A3 7 



/A 

AUG 1955 



GX i 

s 

■ / 

XT' 

/ 





too- a cA 3 7 - OX / 



August 11, 1955 


. 'f‘ ,rv ma 

b\ 


altfornia 


ALL INFORMATION CONTAINED 

dateIS?-- 6 ^^^ 


» 

a <ft. 

TK r- 


a> < 

-—2 -2 
•<£ 


J#ar 


four letter dated August 1, 1955 , kae 
been received , and in response to four inquiry, I 
would like to advise that our files reflect that 
the effects of Nikola Tesla were taken into custody 
after his death by the Office of Alien Property and 
not by thi3 Bureau. 

Since ice did not oarticirate in the handling 
of Hr. Tesla's effects , we are unable to supply the 
information you requested . 

Sincerely yours , 


John Edgar Boover 

Director 


Tnilsi>n _ _ -L _ 
PVtivrvjmt ___ 


NOTE: Bufiles reflect no record on correspondent • This 

type of reply utilised by Internal Security Division in 
answering similar inquiry em on 6/30/55. (65-47953-33) 

Cover memo from Mr. Belmont to Mr. Boardman dated 6/29/55 
set out background of this matter which concerned the death 
! of Tesla , a. famous electrical inventor. Bureau was not 
involved in this matter, and the opening of the safe men- 
tioned was done by the Office of Alien Property. 


'rr'ywcL 


JRH; sms 


(ft? §tP 28 195 !^ 


yx 







liform 
September 10., 1S55. 


^JA 


Hr. . ohn ..agar uoover. 

Federal Bureau Of Investigation , 


l suing ton 


Dear- u r. Hoover: 


Hcfering to my letter to you August first, this year - 3 ' our letter 
to me, August 11th., reletive to the matter of the papers of Mr. 
Hihola^Tesla. 

On August 26, I wrote the office of Alien Property regarding this 
matter, indicating that I had received the information from :^ou 
that it was their department which had taken the ■‘■esla ^roperti^ 
into custody/- - not j’-ours.. 

I have a letter from Mr. Henry G. Killeen - that Department - File 
Humber KGH:H STIrelk 017-5563, in which I am told that office 
"never had custod* 1 -, nor has vested, any propert 3 ’ - of Mikola Tesla". 

As I began this matter with 3 r ou - because it was stated in Mr. 
O’lleill^s bool: that it was 3 r our department who opened Tesla's safe £ 
I an wondering if you have any further suggestions along lines 1 ^^ 


nine iciiov: 


;o obtain some infors 


in this regard? 


'or ”our tine and trouble. 


RfCORDED-12 


/co - 5337 - 6 XZ' 


SS61 ST m 





^ - o? c? y ~ c> y 
~ / /' -i — - — :i — : * 

September 20, 1955 



fi L information contained 
herein IS UNCLASSIFIED, ' 

DATEii^-B; 


UUI 1 I nillLU 


^ I have received your letter dated September 10, 
195S.& 


As you were advised by my letter of August 11, 
1955 , this Bureau was not connected in any respect with 
the acquisition or custody of the effects of Nikola Tesla , 
and it is therefore not possible to furnish you any 
additional information . 


Sincerely yours. 


John Edgar Sooner 
Director 


NOTE: 


laic 


-V\ 
v/ 




By letter 8-11-55, we ref erred the Office of 

Alien Proverty , which Office to have 

assumed custody of Tesla *s effects subseouent to his deal 
( 65-47953-6 ) 



MAILED 30 



' r'FORMATlOH CTTITAltJED 
r~:; is uncl 

■'V7 V.J.U 



RECOGNITION FOR TESLA — 

(Please fill out this form and mai! to the address appearing be*low.) 

thFtes la society 

University Station, Box 135 
Minneapolis 14, Minnesota 


(date) 


(city & state) 

Hon. Arthur E. Summerfield 
Postmaster General, Postofficc Dept. 

Washington, D. C. 

•• t 

Dear Sir: 

Nik ola Tes la’s contributions to.science, industry, and to his adopted 
country*~have greatly inspired engineering progress. His electrical sys- 
tems helped create an American conomy of world pre-eminence. 

We respectfully request issuance of a 1956 commemorative stamp 
to be issued on the centennial of Tesla's birth (1856-1943). 

/» (signed) • 


Cr 

INDEXED-*? 




not ncconoto 

132 jUL : ■ £j5 


AMERICAN SRBOBRAN 
June 29, 1955 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



by Alfred H. Sinks 

Nikola Tealo wa§ a great Inventor— 
and oho a prophet without hono r 

G OUNTSR-ESPIONACE WHEE LS 
started tur ni ng early on the 
morning of January 8, 1 043. Knx - 
ious FBI agents slipped into* a room 
In the Hotel Xcw York er wh ere. 
late the nig ht b efore,, a cham ber- 
maid had d iscov crcd the body of 
Nikola TesTa, dead at '1^6 /regarde d 
by many as the greatest scientif ic 
genius of his time . 

bur years, Tesla had been making 
scientific predictions so fantastic as 
to be literally out of this world. Of 
late he had been working — or so he 
said — on revolutionary new weap- 
ons powerful enough to annihilate 
armies at a single blow. 

There was only one Tesla, and 
the story might — incredible as it 
sounded— be true. The ol d man 's 
safe might hold these secrets, and 


the Government could not risk the 
c hance of enem y spies getting there 

. \ 

Hal f hoping to fin d something f 

whi ch w o uld br ing a sudden and •' 
decis ive end to World War II, the I 
oj&n tlic dead. man's \ 
st rong box . If anything of impor- 
tance was discovered, it has never 
been revealed. 

Vet, their quick ac lion was ju s- 
tified, for you could never be s ur e 
alxmt Tesla, one of the stran ;e*t 

took him with a grain of salt, v«t 
no serio us scientist _da£cd_shriig 
a way h is c laim s as jQon sense. N*»i 
after Thomas Edison tried it and 
T^TT prov ed hi m wro ng. 

Tin* woHd 'sheading physicists 
and electrical engineers had to eat 
crow back in the 1880s when Tesla 
solved a problem they had thought 
impossible. That one accomplish- 
ment — the invention of a practical 
alternating-current motor and gen- 


jrsr, 


115 


• • 


era tor— p ut Tesla’* name 
jhe " nr m s 1,1 

T'rnm 


>P se t eg 


his iiyvcnt^^^prnng the 

industrial . JCCjt'xilVC UL Fur with- 
out his alternating current, there 
would l>r no mass production of 
ntitmnobiics, aircraft, refrigerators; 
no great water-power dams and 
generating plants, no Diesel-electric 
trains; we could not have developed 
radio, television or atomic power. 

w orked w idi— a lee hi e force at l>c st 
— Could be sent no more tha n a 
Couple of mile s over wires beca use 
its powcMeakcd aw ay rapidly, into 
the surroimditu; ajnmsphere. Lights 
near the power station might burn 
brightly and steadily, luit those near 
the end of the line would be dim 
and fluttering. 

Tesla sold his basic alternat ing* 
c urrent pat ents in 1MK H, for ^mil- 
lion dollars dow n. B\ IK 1 ? 1 *, the fir st 
great power station a t Niagara Falls 
lijd been built, and by the end of 
1 two more Tesla generators 
had been installed. Within a few 
years, the pace of life over half the 
earth had changed from a crawl to 
a fasi gallop — and it has been gath- 
erin'.; speed ever since. 

r 1 1L1E m\n w h o t by Ids hiil li.int 
• idea of a “rotating 


field “ chan** 


mg magne tic 
il die fate i if the earth 


an<l the living ha bits of tin- hu man 
race was a Cr oat t lxln7 mTff37 in 
Stniljan, a village in wh.it is now 
Yugoslavia, but was then part of the 
old Aijstm-1 bmgarinn Finpiie. 

When lie was almut si\, Nikola 
Tesla’s father, the village priest, 
was transferred to a larger parish 
in the city of Gnspic. There, the 
lad grew up and pcrfrrtrd his ear- 
liest “inventions.” Of these, his fa- 

1 If. 


i^^vorite was nn “engine" powered by 
16 Jtmc bugs, harnessed in sets of 
four to spokes which radiated from 
the drive shaft. 

Nikola was a frail lad, often ill ; 
and h e nearly went blind 1mm n*l 
much rending . He read everythin*; "" 
Ti e could ge t his hands on. not only 
sc iencc_ I mt al so religion, philuso- 
phy,. hist ory, literature . Bv the timr 
he finished high school, he was flu- 
ent in French, German and Italian, 
as well as his native ScrlxvOroat. 

< He got his schooling— the best 
his doting family could afford— at 
Gnspic, Oarlstadt, Gratz, the Uni- 
versity of Prague and, finally, at 
Budapest. At the University, he saw 
his first electric motor, a new type 
direct-current affair whose brushes 
and commutators sent out showers 
of crackling blur sparks. 

“If wc got rid of those brushes 
and commutators, with all that 
noise and loss of energy, we’d have 
a much better motor,” Nikola told 
his professor. “Perhaps it might be 
done with an alternating current.” 
“Nonsense!” barked the profes- 
sor. “Ail alternating current would 
never run anything. V on ’re not lh e_ 
brilliant student 1 thought you 
wereT forge mi 

- Bnt~Tcs la could n ot forg et. The 
t ra chcr's ridicule onl y stamped l h « * 
idea indelibly onTis brain. It be- 
came an obsession, a "passion - bow 
to make an alternating current 
drive a motor. In cvcrv idle mo- 


ment, w lierever he went, lie wrestled 
with this problem. 

TV si n’s mind had an i in nsi i .i 1 
t w ist. Almost from infancy^ hr had 
bee n able to see thin gs in his mind's 
e ye so viv id ly — and in s ueh minu te 

detail tha t often lie had trouble 

telli ng th e rc.iTTmjTTThr imaginary. 

t;< >k< >\T.r 


• # 


Where the average engineer or 
inventor would reach instinctively 
for drawing board, paper and pen- 
cil, Tesla would s imply switch o n 
that unc anny mag ic la ntrrn ~TnsTdc 
h is hrainTIfe wo uTd Ti\ a fnrn t . 1 1 
i mage there . Then lie would alter 
this detail or that, discard one plan, 
try another, without e ver nutting a 
line on paper. 

Years later— from these mental 
images alone — he could giv e h is 
work men exact instructions on how 
tohuHtTe^i part TIT a new device, 
though it was unlike anything ever 
seen before. 

Thus, needing no drafting room 
and few Ja!>oratory conveniences to 
work on an idea, Tesla could use 
ever)- spare minute that he had to 
test and revise his theory of alter- 
nating current. 

H is first real job was man ager 
of a new iv organlzcd_tclcphonc 
com pany in "Budapest. Bui tele- 
phone circuits were dull stuflT com- 
pared with live challenge of that 
tine big idea. He mo ved to Paris 
where he became a kind of genera! 
trouble-s hooter for t h e Co ntinental 
EJIsmT Compa n y . 

His brain was still chimiing away 
at his 1 iig prill »lrmlT>ut tnc trouble 
was. hcToTiT JnT share it with 
trained men who might have helped 
hi m work tt out. For wheneve r he 

JUNE, 19 55 


m entioned alternating cu rr ent to an 
el ect ricaT eng i nerr , IhenuTT^Ijuld 
look at him as though' he were 
crazy. 

t h e m omciUAviicii 
he knew he had solv ed ii. u;i5 
wa in ng with ajrieruljn the Bois Jr 
B oulogne- Suddvjd>vJic_5iypped 
short and beg an jabbi ng wip, his 
enne :»t-_so n ie .invi sible objrrt i,» 
the air. 

^ee—h works?’* he shoute d . “h 
i s 1 1 1 C Jll t ■ i \ ! ng m , ig n e tie field u hich 
causes the armature in turn. It pulls 
the magnets around with it, causing 
the shaft to revolve. As l oscillate 
this switch, causing the curren* to 
flow first in one direction, then the 
other . . 

Never mind what his friend 
thought. Tesla had the answer. 

At thcoftitc, Ills colleagues sculled 
or looked blank. But the manager, 
listening to the outpourings of 
scientific jargon, suddenly thought 
of his boss back in the United States. 
ir.T icrr ;rr>r some truth in wh at the 
C roat' sa id, surely the famous chx- 
triea l wizard wou ld lie sTnart 
enongliAo sec it. 

5 ( * Tie ga_yc Trs&Ji let ter of in- 
tnxhvrtion j_o Thomas Edison ami 
urged him to trv his luck in Amcr* 
ica. Tims, T esla, n ow 27 t arrived 
i n .Yew York . Tie was handsome, 
over six- fret -l wo, with a distin- 
guished head and deep-set blue 
eyes. His Slavic face was broad 
across tlu* ch eekbones, his dark hair 
thick, luiTciiiu sharply pointed. Of 
Worldly goods, he had the clothes 
on his back, four cents injCitsh, the 
lett er to E < lisnn . and the id ea wli ic 1 1 
was to chang e the w urld. 

Edison tho t ight less t h an not ! ling 
of the id ea. It seemed so prepos- 
terous tha t he wouldn't even lis ten 

117 


• • • • • 


M 


' — and, uf course, T^n had no 
drawings with which^ByJo con- 
vince him. Rut EdisoBWvc T urn a 
joU - tULJbc ..had, ^yg<jlcnLlfiiin>»g 

• CL a Q- engineer and Ed ison needed 
trained me n. 

Busy with routine electrical work, 
Tesla waited nearly three years for 
a chance to turn his mental image 
into an actual motor he could show 
to others. In 1 887, he was able to 
borrow enough money to start his 
own lalnjratory, and the following 
> e ar the alternating-current motor 
and [generat or were practical r eali- 
ties- oil a laboratory scale— though 
much practical engineering would 
Mill be needed to fit them to com* 
rnereial use. 

( leurge Westinp house. another 
i nventor, was th e fi rst t o sec their 
value . He bought die patents and 
gavc^Tcsla a job as engineer in his 
Pittsburgh factory. 

But Tesla couldn't get along with 
the other Wcstinghousc engineers. 
From his standpoint, the alternat- 
ing-current joli was done. Even 
“schoolboys" could now iron out 
the few remaining kinks. Mean- 
time, his biain had started to hatch 
even bigger dreams. 11c went bar k 
l < > his laborato ry i n New Vork . 

“lie ajoni — * % he once told a 
srirnre writer. “7 


invention'. Be al 


1tat * sT))e^s< r i et of 
me — that's 


wher 


great ideas are iMjrn.’* 


\ I n s K Hr. \ v \s . 1 1 r the years tha t 
f ul 1 ow ci cs ! a ha d many a d - 
1 ninny acquain tances. T>nt"sel( u 
•ybienj. Alia his mother* n<> wom- 
an e ver entered his personal life . 

I li^ manner toward other s was 
c ordial but reserve d^ distan t. Hjs 
word s were as if utt ered by some 
god, s itting on an Olympus high 

1 18 


^fcovc the res t of human ity. Backed 
^jy his fame, those words made a 
tremendous impression. 

He lectured at every scientific 
cent er in tins count ry and itTall the 
im portan t capMaTT ab road. Things^ 
which, as yrt, existed^ only inside 
tliat amazing brain of his were so 
real to him, he made them real 
to his listeners. 

He described radar and r adio 
broadca sti ng ant) even televisio n. 
He advocated clcctro-ihcrapy. He 
foresaw a day when man would 
control nature in every respect — 
even the weather — when machines 
of all kinds, and the power to run 
them, would be so cheap that pov- 
erty would vanish from the world. 
Without wanting to be, Tesla 


was a snpet n actor. Alter listening 
to him" and seeing bis wonders, au- 
diences were ready to believe nearly 
anything. 

Tesla reasoned that you could 
sell electric power cheap if you 
could do away with the millions of 
poles and insulators, the millions of 
tons of copper wire used to transmit 
it from place to place. He thought 
he knew how to do it — and l.P . 
Morgan b arked him with S30(\TRTO. 

On Long’ T slant 1, Te sla 1 >uilt_ a 
h uge po we r pl a nt vvi tTTa 154-ft>ot 
Steel-ribbed tower topped by an 
enormous mushroom-shaped cop- 
per dome. From this dome he 
planned to bombard tliecarth'scrust 
with millions of volts of electric 
energy. T he power so added to the 
earth's permanent charge could be 
drained off al some other point--- 
any point — on the earth's surface. 
Thus, it would be jxrssible for elec- 
tric power to be sent anywhere 
without conduits, poles or wires. Or 
so he thought, until he tried it. 

CORONET 


• ••••• 


In Novemljer- 1898 f Tesla a n- 
I nounccd that hr could abolish wa r. 

The inventor had dcs^ied a 
small, inexpensive, radio-cJ^Mlcd 
boat which, through its H|^)srd 
ability to destroy the biggest battle- 
ships, would make great navies use- 
less. N ot man y years l ater, he was 
talking of another super-weapon^ a 
“ dea t h" ray'* which wouldTann ihi- 
l ate whole arm lesT 

Vet Tesla never suspected that 
th e real super- weap on of the fTit urc 
wo uld come from atomic fi ssion. 
For Einstein's basic notion which 
led to smashing the atom, he had 
only ridicule. Alone in his middle 
age, he had fallen out of step with 
the world’s great thinker. 

Not aJJ_Tcsla*s Jater inventions 
were fantastic. Some, like his in- 
duction coils and oscillators, and 
pioneer work on “tuned” electrical 
circuits, were highly important. 

Though he never, succeeded in 
transmitting power without wires 
on a big scale, he dW prove that a 
single wuc is enough. And some of 
his brilliant prophecies inspired the 
more plodding scientists to work out 
the practical problems uf induction 
heating, radio-telephone, radar and 
many other electronic marvels of 
today. 

But as he g rew he with- 


drew furtl 
m[^Ksrl77 

souWca tike a v-iicr from another 
planet. For cnnpani()ns Mp_no V y. 
the old man h .i d on ly his dreams 
and tficy grew stranger uTth the 
years. Completely alone at l.ist 
s tooped^ gauntTig ure w ith thin T si}. 
very ha if-Hic used to slip fro m' his 
hotel room. In iv a bag t»f hirdsret | 
a nd trudge slow ly over to a park 
w he re h tint 1 ret Is of pigeons awaited 
him. These Wf re Ins friends' Thrv 
needed hitn, though tfiF w orld <1 id 
n ot. 

When he grew too ill to go out, 
each day he sent a Western Union 
messenger to the park. After feed- 
ing the birds, the t>oy was instruc ted 
to see if any of them seemed sick. 
If so, he was to bring them hack to 
Tesla’s room where the inventor 
would nufsc them gently back to 
health. 

Perhaps this sad little labor of 
love sh owed "t h at the ma n who 
c hang ed the world hat , jJJs- 
covereef a grea t truth. Pet hap s he 
knew now that TTie greatest power 
f or ^ood lies noTTn lonely thought 
I >ut in a human heart pu lsating — 
tuned circuits'" 


further an d_f u n hrr with- 
His s* range prophecies 


hke his own ’’tuned circuits — in_ 
t unc with the heart sjnf Ins fellovv- 
mcn . Or did Fe~ e ver know ? Yo u 
could never b e sure about Tesla. 


» 


Winnie Wll 

I n THE early 1920s, when Winston Churchill had offended b*th his 
own supjxjrtcrs and the political opj>osition, the late George Bernard 
Shaw wrote him: “I enclose two vouchers for the preinifrr of my new 
plav. for yourself and a friend— if any.** 

Back to the playwright promptly came the theater cheeks with this 
note from “Winnie*’: “1 regret 1 am unahle io attend the premiere of 
your new play. Please send inc two vouchers for the second j»erfonnamr 


— if any.” 
JUNE,* 1 955 


WClui. la ICW^W .>>»•» 


XV) 


• ••••• 




-RECOGNITION FOR TESLA — 

3 At long last Serbians — American and Canadian — have 
acted to honor the memory and achievements of one of Ser- 
bia's greatest sons. I 

For j the world-wide Centennial celebration of Dr. 
Nikolfr^TeslaX birth next year, Serbs on this Continent 
plan to erect a bust statue of the electrical genius to stand 
before the entrance of the Monastery at Libertyville, 111. 

Steps looking towards that* end were taken at the recent 
SNFjcpnvention following the reading of by President 

MUcRadakovich fr om Hi6 Grace, BishofrfNicolai. As the uni- 
tfersahy-renowped churchman staTeJ, erection of a< suitable 
monument, by Serbians, would forever remind other Serbs 
of the honor and glory of Dr. Nikola Tesla . . ... And that he 
-was a SERBIAN, son of a SERBIAN ORTHODOX clergy- 
man, born in the SERBIAN SELO of Smiljan in Lika. 

Further, His Grace urged that the undertaking be a joint 
one and representative of ALL the Serbian oxgarozatiangrin 
the United States and Canada^ He naturally looked to the SNF ! 
for leadership, and the greatest monetary contribution. Butflhe 
also besought the help of the Serbian Nat'l Defense and the i 
Jedinstvo beneficial society. \ 

The Convention voted $1000 for the project and a j 
hand collection was takenjip among the delegates- and j 
Quests, kinsmen Milo j ^ ftConjevich of Joliet, I1L, giving 
$200. It is probable tSat the balance of the needed $300(L/^ 
will be raised thru public good-will offerings and vfa 
cash gifts of the other two organizations mentioned, f 

And after a suitable bust has been erected for Dr. Tesla, 
Bishop Nicolai suggested*a<^imilar-like monument hor/or thej 
memory of Dr. Milpifc^Pupin, also a world-renowned scientist, j 
author and educator. 

This is a subject near and dear to all good Serbian hearts 


^ : 
<c> c 




INDEXED • 36 


4r 


60 OCT V 



"AMERICAN SRB0BRAN* 
September 28, 1955 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



WON CONTAINED 


c 


1 




■« r-HDMAT^v CONTAINED 
jt MC' * ''TIEI 



SNF Ojtens Drive for Tesla Memorial at Liber tyville- — - 

$2000 PUBLIC AID SOUGHT 


PITTSBURGH. PA. — The Serb 
Nat'l Federation Executive Board 
has acted quickly to implement a 
Convention decision to honor the 
of the illustrious Dr. Nik- 
ol££esla. 

At its first meeting of Octo- 
ber 8. the Baard drafted *a resolu- 
tion calling on all SNF members 
and good Serbians to help fi- : 
nance a memorial project fer the : 
late scientist-inventor genius. 

This would stand before the 
entrance of the Monastery In 
Literty ville. Ml. 

C<xt of the contemplated project. 
whic\ would clarion to the world 
that i)r. Tesla was a Serbian, is 
estimated at $3000. The Convention 
voted $1000 to the cause and a hand 
collection among 122 delegates 
yielded several hundred 
more. \ 

Kinsman Milos \Konjevieh of 
Joliet. 111., gave $2oV 


sarv monies and complete the 
project in time for the world- 
wide Centennial, celebration for 


Public Aid Sought 


r 

the genius next year. 

• Spearheading t^c* movement for 
recognition, especially ajm o n g 

American elements. 

SOCIETY, founded bv sglontist- 
engineer Leland\Andcrson. L fanat- 
ical admircr^of the late Dr. Nikola 
Tesla X 

Mr. Anderson right now is con- 
ducting a search for a famous por- 
trait of the Serbian electrical wiz- 
ard done at the turn of the century 
in New York. 

Seek Mrssinr Portrait 
✓ 

In his current TESLAIAN Dub- 
L'calion. Mr. Anderson revealed the 
work, by Princess Vi'Ima Lwoff- 
dollars . Parlaghy. is missing. 

j Reviewing developments, Mr. 
Anderson wrote: 

“On March 1, 1916, the Princess 
gave a reception ir her new studio 
in New York especially to exhibit 


1 Balance of the needed sum is now her latest protrait of N : Vola Tesla, 
being sought thru good-will’ offer- An article in the N r W YORK 
ings of the general Serbian popu- TIME^ f^r March ?. 1916. stated — 
lace in the United States and Can- ! “ ‘It was one of the beliefs cF 

adA ' | Mr. Tesla that there was some- 

lh 


fund, similar to the one 'be- 
ll^* conducted to heln defray 
mortgage expenses on Shadeland, 
"Has been established. 

It H hoped to raise the neces- 


tbAne unlucky 'about posine for a 
nicture and he never ^at to anv 
before ha enterej the s*"dio of 
the Prinre*f7 i np rr>om whi^h she 
lv*d chosen did nof hove a sky- 


light in it and the much desired 
North exposure was missing. 

“ ‘At the suggestion of Mr. TeSla. 
a cluster of powerful incandescents 
was put up in the corner of the 
ipartment and the rays, filtered 
the {TESLA | thru blue glass, were Just the right 
quality. The portrait was shown 
under the same illumination. 

At Ease for Sitting 
“ ‘Mr. Tesla, having solved the 
oroblom of the artifical fun. fell to 
thinking about other parts of the 
universe, and there he sat oblivious 
to his surroundings. 

" ‘The painter was able to pro* 
ducc 'a likeness in which there »jt 
no evidence that the subject wa 
conscious that anybody wai 
watching him. much len study- \ 
inr his features from the other ! 
side of the ease.1. 

“ ‘Among those who attended the 
reception were Mrs. C. B. Alex- 
ander. Henry P. Davison, the 
Countless de Rittenburg and Mrs. 
E. T. Isham.’ ” j 

After the Princess died, in 1923. 1 
her studio and all objects of art, ' 
wa« sold rt Auction. 

The Telsa portrait, 53x4* 
inches, appeared on the cover of 
TIME nnrarine (Jnly 2A. IfU) 
and in the ELECTRICAL »X- 
PF RIM ENTER CJanuary 1«91, 
Mr. Andemon says. * 

Its location is not now known. 


INDEXES • 1^ 


At . . 

n- . 


4 


\y 


\n 




AMERICAN SRBOBRAN 
October 26, 1955 
Pittsburgh, Pa # 




Half of $3000 Costs 
For Statue Pledged 


hr Ctt 


Cadiz, O., Serb Gives SI 00 
For Bust Image of Inventor 
To Be Placed at Monastery 

Pittsburgh, Pa- — Half of th^$3000 fund goal for a statue 
memorial of the late Dr. Nikola ^Teala has been realized, the 
SWF announced today. 

I In fact, total contributions counted so far come to 
41580. 

The Fund is an outgrowth of a plea by Bishop Nicolai 

for Serbians to do honor for the* 


memory of the noted electrical 
wizard during the world-wide 
Centennial celebration planned 
for the genius next year. j 

In the wake of the plea, 1 
voiced at the recent 7th Con- 
vention at Niagara Falls, Can- 
ada, the delegates approved a . 
$1000 gift from the SNF and | 
decided to raise, by public 
grant, the balance of $2000. 


historians, writers, educators, 
scientists, etc., would not be 
misled, Bishop Nicolai believes. 

Be that as it may, the SNF s 
goal is to amass the needed mon- 
ies in time to erect and dedicate 
the memorial before the Tesla 
Centennial celebration ends. 

Donors and the amounts of 
their donations are as follows: 


grani, iue Diwncc 01 SNF $ 

A hand collection among the Delegate M. Konjcvich 
122 grass-roots leaders of the So-j ** Todor Dragich 
cietJ raised another $450. Then, Petar Borovich 

at ifc first meeting October 5, the SNF Counsel N. Stone 
ne\wy-elected Executive. Board of Delegate N. Stepanovich 


the SNF appealed to the mem- 
bership at large to fulfill the bal- 
ance required. 


NJ 

j First Cooftnbution $100 \| 

A scant 24 hours after the ap- 
peal was published in the Society's 
1 / “Srbobran** organ last Wednes- 
i day, Sime Zelich of Cadiz. O., 
gave $ 1 00. j. 

The proposed memorial, a 
statue image, would be placed be- . 
•fore the entrance of the St. Sava 
’Serbian Monastery in Libertyville. ! 

i in. I 


Maxim Jakovac 

llija Janjanin 
Lou Balta 
Jo van Vukcevlch 
Milan Kajganovich 
Stevan Rogulia 
Boedan Dratrisich 
Milan Tomtch 
Todor Vuicich 
Djuro Lukich 
G. Stoisavljevich 
R. Vukadinovich 
Janko Mrmich • 
Petar Maravich 
Mirko Bnranin 


1000,00 

200.00 

50.00 

25.00 

25.00 

20.00 

20.00 

20.00 

10.00 

10.00 I 

10.00 

10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 



*♦ the delegates approved a 
000 gift from the SNF and 
cided to raise, v public 

»nt, the balance < 000. 


v^cinciuuai kcicuuuuu ci(u« 


| Donors 
their donat. 


d the amounts 
.*• are as follows: 


of 


SNF ■ $ 

\ hand collection among the Delegate M. Konjevfch 
grass-roots leaders of the So- , " Todor Dragicb 
| raised another $450. ThanJ ; Petar Borovich 
« first meeting October 5, tha SNF Counael Nl Stone 
ly-elected Executive. Board of Delegate N. Stepanovich 


Nj 


SNF appealed to the mem- 
ship at large to fulfill the bal- 
e required. 

First Contribution $100 

\ scant 24 hours after the ap- 
J was published in the Society** 
bobran” organ last Wednes-, 
/. Sime Zelich of Cadiz, O.. 
e $ 1 00. . 1. 

Hie proposed memorial, a • 
rue image, would be placed be- 
e the entrance of the St. Sava 
bian Monastery in Libertyville. 


Maxim Jakovac 
Ilija Janj&nin 
Lou Baltn % / 
Jo van Vulccevich 
Milan KajganovieK 
Steven Rogulfa 
Bond an Draviaich 
Milan Tomich 
Todor Vuicicb 
Djuro Lukich 
G. Stoisavljevich 
R. Vukadinovleh 
Tanko Mrmich . 
Petar Maravich 
Mirko Baranin 
Stanko Jelich 


<r There ?t would proclaim to 
ns of thousands of Serbian 
si tors annually that Nikola 
esla was elf Serbian immigrant 
ock and son of a Serbian 
rthodox clerfirvman,” Bishop 
icolai declared. 

For half a century and more. 

4 general American public has 
en misled anent the nationality 
the man who foretold the com- Mdinko^Alexich. war invalid 
: of atomic energy power. j (Omaha. Nebr.) 

Only recently, a orominent 


1000.00 

200.06 

50.00 
25 . 00 * 

* 25.00 

20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
10.00 
10.00 . 
10.00 
10.00 

5.00 
5.00 
5.00- 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5 00 
5.00 
5.00 


** ★ ★ ★ 

Prof. Anthonv Tomovich 
( Edmonton, Alberta, 

Can.) 10.00 

Teta Andia Mamula 
( Pittsburgh) 5.00 

Martha Mamula Bjelosh 
f Pittsburgh) 10.00 

Sime Zelich (Cadiz, O.) I 00.0' 


vmerican magazine listed him, 
icorrectly, as of Croatian „ 
tock. The mistake was subse- 
uentlv publiclv corrected with 
oologies by the publication. 
But lacking an image reference, 
th historical statistics, similar 
-ors are likely in the future. 

Old References Poor 

The magazine publication, for 
'tance. explained it obtained its 
r erence material from an anti- 
ited guide book. 

Since the misleading matteT 
•re was never challenged bv 
rbians and other interested 
rties before, the magazine Iogi- 
lv assumed it was factual. 

Erection rlf a bust statue. 

listing Dr. Tesla's da f e of 
irth. b»r*b«l»ce. parents, e*c.. 
onM counter ^Ke old sMsle 
nd make certain that future 


Total 


$ t. 


the honoring, forever, of two of Serbia’s best-known immi- 
grant sons who contributed so greatly to the\ welfare and 
prosperity of their adopted America. 

We hope to report developments as soon as they take 
phee, remembering Bishop Nikolai’s concluding remarks: 

“Nikola Tesla, in the field of science, brought the 
| Sevbian name great glory — just as did the greatest Serbian 
i knights on the field of battle.” 



J 


23 June 56 


Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Washington 25, D.C. 




Gentlemen: 

During my senior year at Georgetown University I read J.J.O'Niel's 
Biography of Nikoli Tesla} the book, entitled “Prodigal Genius; 
described quite a few of Tesla's experiments, most of which I tried 
myself in the physics lab. I am interested in reviewing Tesla's 
experiments in wireless electric power transmission. 

Unfortunately, Tesla died in 1945 just at the time he supposedly 
had developed a system of wireless power transmission. Since World 
War 11 was then in progress his papers were seized and sealed by the 
F.B.I. I suppose that by now Tesla's papers have been released for 
publication, but a call to the Library of Congress produced no 
results. Therefore, I have two questions: 


1) Does the F.B.I. now have Tesla's scientific papers? 

2) If so, are they available for public inspection? 

If they were released, who has them? 


! 


I will certainly appreciate any help you can give me aloag these lines. 
Tesla published very little of his findings; this, coupled with the 
fact that wireless power is connected by most people with "Death Bays" 
and crack-pots has made it nearly Impossible for me to find anything 
on the subject. \ 



t 


r 

RECORDED • 8b 
INDEXED • # 

(-122 



7 


; INFORMATION CONTAINED 
ITEM IS UNCLASSIRED^ 

H /\TF 


June 29, 1956 







/ 


' Nikoh 

Tour letter dated June 25, 1956, has been received, 
and in reaponae to your Inquiry, I would like to advise that our 
files reflect that the effects of Ni kola Tesl a were taken Into custody 
after his death by the Office of Alien Property and not by this Bureau. 

Since we did not participate in the handling of 
Mr. Tesla's effects, we are unable to supply the information 
you requested. 

C 

Sincerely yours, 


COMM — FBI 

JUN2 91956 

MAILED 24 


&& 

Tolson 

Board man _ 

Nichols 

Belmont 

Bar bo 

Mohr 

Parsons — 

Rosen 

Tamm 

Sizoo 


John Edgar Hoover 
Director 


c. 

*/> 


5 » 

-n O 

CO 


- X 

- 00 "» 




NOTE: Bufiles reflect no record on correspondent and revezd th<e correct 
spelling of Tesla’s name as "Nikcjja. " Bufiles reflect this type of^ejS^ hz 
been utilized by the Domestic Intelligence Division in answering sSnjJgr 
inquiries. (65-47953; 100-2237) Cover memo from Mr. Belmont ro ' 
Boardman 6-29-55, set out background of this matter which concerned the 
death of flPfesia, a famous electrical inventor. Bureau was not involved 
in this matter, and the opening of the safe containing his effects was done 
by jtho-vOffice of Alien Property. 

’ - : YU BOO 1 

ELJ:jh:mmh . , 

(3) 0 / / , X /X 


,\ 


linccrrowd _ 
Tele. 

Hollonfeif _ 1 
Gandy 


-JUL 


17 1°^ 


T 


V v 


J/, f 

a ■ 


/ A 

/1 ( ^ 
Of < 


/ 

V 





Office Mem. v . , idtim • united ( - government 

DATE: 7/25/57 


DIRECTOR, FBI 

SAC, NEW YORK (65-12290) 


UBJECT: 


NIKOLA 
IS -YU 


LA (Deceased) 


--It 


¥ 




/ 


V 


IStreet, New York 
24, New York, a united of Yugoslav 
extraction, who on occasion, voluntarily furnishes 
the New York Office frith information he considers to 
he in the interests of the Security of the United 
States Government, furnished Special Agept 
NICHOLAS J.MASTROVICH the following info rmati on on . 

J>ay 3, 1957s ^ ^ / apjaffgfeytSt 

;a ted that a certain woman named 
Mrs. MARGARET, 'pTORM who lives with her husband, 

JOHN, at the 'Colonial Hot31* 51 West 8lst Street, New 
York 24, New ibrk,"has been issuing newsletters which 
contain^nfacrmation pertaining to flying saucers 
and**rfferplanetary matters. , . , 

5t ;• - // // A c ' - f ' 7T ' 

■H^Btated that in his opinion Mr. and 
Mrs. STORM ar^^xplol ting the reputation and genius 
of NIKOLA TESLA, deceased, inventor of Yugoslav 
extraction who ahieved world wide fame as a result of 
his inventions in the United States. 



■L 

rARET, jJ'fORI 


b lb 

blC 

f/eu-’s terr 

bib 




y 


TESLA was bom in Smiljan, Yugoslavia in 

July, 1859 and came to the United States in 1894 

and became a naturalized United States citizen. In 

1886 TESLA designed the arc -lighting system and two 

years later he invented the Tesla motor and designed 

a plan f6r the transmission of alternating current. 

In subsequent years, TESLA’s discoveries and inventions* - ' 

indided such fields and appliances as wireless > 

communication, elecftribalj oSctfij&tion, radiant power and 

radio active matter. After 1900, communications u j. - 

lost of c -V/’' 

* 


.V 


xauxu au uivc iiia U/cr. nx i/cr conuuuiij.ee 

and wireless power transmission occupied, me 
his research. , . , z.ti J.A 

~\ : .QI?. ViQ 


Q- 

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1 - 


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NJM 

(4) 


- SFI zl3 A - 

(RM) (Encs . 2 P '' i C L && ™ /flO — 
gelesco (Info) (Encl.l) (RM) / — — . — 1 

rECOROEO-56 

cess?' 66 


Bueau 

Lcs I&gelesco (Info) (Enc 
New York (65-12290) 

:mcd 



JUL 29 19S7 




1957 / 



NY 65-12290 


TESLA's only military invention was -a method 
to which he once eluded but new fully described . * / 
This 'invention was a means whereby an impenetrable 
"wall of force" can be erected around the United 
States' borders which would render helpless any 
military attack. TESLA disclosed the existence 
of his plan in 1934 and stated he intended to present 
it to the Geneva Conference but seldom referred to it 
afterward. 


The "New York Times" dated 9/22/4^7 ' 
carried am article setting forth N I COI^tTES LA 1 s plan for a 
"Death Ray". This article Included information to 
the effect that TESLA, on his 84th birthday, July 10, 1940 
advised New York Times reporter UTTTTnTTJ YfiniTTinTiT 
that he was ‘ready to divulge to the United States 
Government the secret of his "teleforce", with which 
he said airplane motors would be melted at a distance 
of 250 miles so that an invisible Chinese wall of 
defense would be built around the country against any 
attempted attack by an enemy airforce no matter how 
large. According to TESLA, this "teleforce" was 
based on am entirely new principle of Physics that 
"no one has ever dreamed about" and was different from 
tlKjrlnciple embodied in his inventions relating to 
the transmission cf electrical power froma distance, 
for which he received a number of basic patents. 

TESLA stated that this new type of force would 
operate through a beam one hundredth millionth of a 
square c dimeter in diameter and could be 
generated from a special plant that would cost no more 
than two million dollars and would take only about three 
months to castruct. TESLA stated that a dxen huch 
plants located at strategic points along the t&ast, 
according to TESLA, would-be enough to defand the 
United States against all possible aerial attacks. 

TESLA stated that this beam would melt any engine 
and would also ignite explosives aboard any bomber. 

TESLA stated that no possible defense against It could 
be devised and he asserted that the beam would be all 
penetrating. 


NY 65-12290 


TESLA stated to Mr. LAWRENCE that he 
makes one Important stipulation before he would 
divulge this secret to the United States Government 
and that was that should the United State Government 
•decide to take up his offer, he. would go to work at . 
once but that the United States Government would have 
to trust him. TESLA stated that he would suffer : 

"no interference from experts." ' 

In this "New York Times" article Mr. LAWRENCE 
commented that With conditions as they were in 1940, 
and with the United States getting ready to spend . 
millions of dollars for National Defense, Mr. TESLA 1 s 
great reputation as an inventor, who always was many 
years ahead of his time, should be given careful 
consideration. Mr. LAWRENCE stated, in his opinion, 
the United States Government should take Mr. TESLA 
at his word and commission him to go ahead with the 
construction of his "teleforce" plant. 


The New York file of Mr. TESLA bears no 
indication that any additional developments were 
carried on in connection with TESA's invention and 
whether or not TESLA fully divulged his new plan 
to the United States Government. 

TESLA died at the age of 85 on January 7# 1943. 


Mr.lUBprovided a two page copy of the 
above mentione^iewsletter which Mr. and Mrs. STORM 
have been distributing in connection with the alleged 
invention by TESLA, which, according to Mr. ad 
Mrs. STORM, consists of a radio type machine known as 
the Tesla SSt which was invented by Mr. TESLA in 1938 
for interplanetary communication. Mr. and Mrs. STORM 
claim that TESLA’s engineers did not complete the 
Tesla Set until._after TESLA* s death in 1943. Mr. add 
Mrs. STORM claim that this Set was placed inoopeiation 
in 1950 and since that time TESLA engineers' have been 
in close touch with space ships, etc. 


bl b 
blC- 


- 3 - 



NY 65-12290 


®ie Newsletter furnished by Mr 
the following names: . 



included 


klb 

b?C 


MARGffiT STORM 

JOHN STOgM ' \ • . 

GE^giTVAN TASSEL, Yucca Valley, (^ifornia ft y 

GEORQ^ffNG, London , Engl and ^ 


OSie files of the New York Office contained* 
no pertinent information regarding any of the f-t A h : •'•/ 

above mentioned individuals, fr rCrt.Tf / ' r j 

Two photostatic copies of this newsletter 
are being sent to the Bureau for purposes of 
information while one copy is being submitted to 
the Los Angeles Office^br information purposes. 





- 4 - 






Mr. J. Edgar Hoover 
Lear Sir: 


• ! INFORMATION contained 


p\ 
t ■ 



!,'• Ui.b-/. 

to 

I an hopeful that you can’ help me obtain certain infcrniaticri 
on records and data, which belonged to Dr. N ikolanT e s 1 a . 

He was an Electrical Engineer and prolific inventor.” 

He was born in Yugoslavia in 1856 and died in the 
United States, New York City, January 7th, 1943. He was a 
naturalized citizen of tnis country. 




The only information I cculd find of nis records was 
a report that the F.B.I. removed his papers for examination, 
and that the records were sealed by the custodian of alien 
property. 


I have been doing some theoretical research of my 
own, which I believe may be along the same lines he followed 
in certain of nis experiments. I also believe the development 
of his ideas would be in the interest of cur country regardless 
of who developes them. 

If it is at all possible for me to have access to 
at least some of his experimental work, I would certainly 
appreciate it. I ini not able, btj reason of the vast finances, 
which would be required, to conduct such experiments myself, 
so the uata he made and collected would be invaluable. 

Of course, it is possible that his records do not 
contain material pertinent to his electronics v-brk, because 
from what I understand from reading about him, he kept most 
of his records in his head and wrote down very little of his 
data . 


It is also possible that some of his iceai are 
impractical, but I fe£l sure that certain of his ideas will 
be of immense value to our country within the next several 
decades or even before, if they are developed at a rapid rate, 


I would appreciate hearing from you on the ^subject, 
if you have any infoeaation pertaining to it, which ycu could 


make available to me. 




i 

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O.lr 




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Ad 


££L2.- 7 

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bmcerely . 
16 MAR 18 



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■ 0W&M 0:-rl&*t£u 

feat our files reflect that fee •Sects ofpr. Nlkola"Te*U were - ' 

/';• taken into custody after Ms. death by ttt Office of Aft# Property f -- 

;’■•• •••• to the Department «f Justice 

■ - • -femOTdtf itffpintiitpife)#^ 

Dr. Tesla's effects, we are unable to supply the Information you 
requested. 


Sincerity fiuri^ 




l _L Jf ' • - ' _ _• '* .1 -* W ^ T _ _ ;■ J 


MOTE: Baffles reflect no reccfrd on correspondent. 


. ■k'v'Uv 

V' .**V. 4 


..' s 1 3-* v •*■ ,. 


‘ r .^-i, -7 electiipai..inventqr. "Bureau ^ts npt invoked hi this fiu^er, auffAeuai 
ir-W* .r; of ttfejeafe containing; his effecto Was done Jw fee Officer Jpien Prrasxty 

»«.dm 3gp DCIitabs ys *\k«*Jabh> t ?•>. :■" 

B .’! ~" -#= k BOD .1 C0MM - FBI I i/fPWt^y k , ■ ,i; #*: t v-;- 


Parsons - - E2M0Krc<-| , . . ; : 1 1 4 19b8 


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MAILED 19 JrtU 3 


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•' INFORMATION CONTAINED 
•TiiMIS UNCLA^’FIED . 

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bSs 


Tolson 

Belmont _ 
DcLoach . 
McGuire _ 

Mohr 

Parsons _ 
Rosen — 

Tarr.rn 




— O Toot letter dated $*ne 24 , 1989 , 


files reflect that the effects of Dr. Ntfc nia"fo«1a weT* tn^poundfed, 
after his death, lay the Office Of Allen Pr o p er ty of the 4>epartm8Mt 
of Justice and not by the FBL Stow are did iwt partic i pa te fc> the / * 

handling of Dr. lMa f i effects, we arejrtabletb supply the \ ; v -^- -> 
In f o rma tion you desire. • • '• ' • - '•••• *.v- - ' . 


Sincerely yours. 


UAW£DS 

JUL2 1959 

<S 3 WM-rm 


• 

A-’ 




John "Edgar H oov er 
.Director 


NOTE: Bofile 100-2^ redeeta tftat Dr. ^ TesU was a world-famous 
4lectriQal Inventor, and at the time of his death-allof his personal 
papers and effects were believed danger omi tc the Country’s security if - 
fiiey fell into un a u t hori s ed bands. Thejx^ ^ ‘ 

John J. O^fl, alleges that the FBI took over a certain safe god opened 
It, ap p ro p ri ating his property.'Baflles Nearly indicate that it was the - v ? 
Office of Alien Property of the^spartment who did so, agl the above. 
reply is lorwarded inanswer ter elated inquiries. j£; r ' . • • 




DCL:mch 

(3) 


s * 1 


jibi >>i I n ? j : 

LSI 


Trotter 
W.C. Sullivi 
Tele. Roc 
n'oiic.r.an 
Gandy 


57 JUL 9 1955' " 


' ;:.a il r on;,: t 1 tflftype - N’iT I 






OPTIONAL fO«M HO. to 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 


f 


Tolson 


Memorandum ~ 

ro MR. TROTTE s* 


/ 


a Mohr y 

a J/ Parsons . /- 

'Q / ^ r ^e\non\ \lZ 


date: 12-6-60 


Parsons 
Inont 
Jalla, 

iach 
Malone . 
McGuire 
Rosen _ 
Tamm — 
Trotter . 





FROM 






W.C. Sullivan _ 

Tele. Room 

Ingram . 


subject: NIKOLA TESLA (DECEASED) 

INFORMATION CONCERNING L - 



Bost^^BBBRseHs^8IS5R5IfHn5ecemi>er o and was referred to Ident 
by switchboar^because he wanted to talk with someone in charge of records 
of deceased. flH|^feaid he is making a research study for U^S^Air Force 
on subject of ge^^^acs. His deadline is ten days from now. flH^Bbaid 
he just discovered a sentence in a book by John jVO’Neill entiuSH^Tne 
prodigal Genius — The Life of Nikola Tesla, ’’ whtoi states the FBI took 
ustody of papers from Tesla’s safe after his death in New York City in 
19^. Tesla was a world-famous Yugoslav scientist anti invento^r^ie 
electrical field who died January 7, 1943, in New York pity.^H^Hfere- 
questejMmmediate access to Tesla’ j^cientific works which light 

onfl|HHBresearch study. I toldflHHRwe would have somebody from 
ou^Bosto^tffice contact him immeaSe^. 


$ 


Bureau file 100-2237 shows no investigation of Tesla has been con- 
ducted by Bureau. Since erroneous statement concerning FBI’s taking 
custody of papers from Tesla’s safe after his death appeared in O’Neill’s 
book published in 1944, Bureau has received numerous inquiries from 
scientists desiring to review Tesla’s writings. Each inquiry has been 
answered by stating FBI did not participate in handling Teslh’s effects, but 
information has come to our attention that Office of Alien Property of Depart- 
ment of Justice may have examined Tesla’s effects. (File indicates that 
representatives of Office of Alien Property did actually review Tesla’s / 
possessions, including his writings, but file does not show what final dispose 
tion was made of Tesla’s possessions.) 


A teletype to Boston Division was prepared, but before it was sent 
HjHBtelephoned again to furnish me the exactogag^n O'Neill’s book in 
wmciHie refers to the FBI. At that time I toldflHBthe statement in the 
book was untrue — thatth^FBI had not examinec^^aken custody of Tesla’s 
papers. I suggested toflflfPthai he might contact Office of Alien Property. 
(Therefore, teletype to Boston was not necessary. ) y £ c - £ ~2. 5 7 - J j 

ACTION: 

For record. 

1 3 1960 

Bu file 100-2237 
1- Mr. Belmont 


cr $5 DEC 8 350 

od^n, 




I 

I 


bit 


Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Department of Information 
Washington 25, D. C. 

^ear Sir: 


r . ayne, inaaana 

t -v February 14, 1961 

■'i INFORMATION CONTAINED 
: Till) IS UNCLA^SSREO ^ 


I am a college student who is doing a research paper 

on Nikola^^esla. As I was collecting the material for my 

Daner, I discovered that at the time of Tesla's death, the 

deoartment of the F.B.I. confiscated the data and papers 

that Tesla had collected from his research in the field of 

electricity. This confiscation of his material was stated 

. Uc J" > Q 1 Vs 1 1 

in the PRODIGAL GhN'IUS by J.Jv'O'Neil, published in 1944 at 
New York city by hashburn Inc. 


I have developed an interest in the discoveries and 
accomplishments of Tesla that is presently limited by the 

shortage of factual material. If in your files, you have 

/ 

any information concerning Nikola Tesla that you are per- 
mitted to release, I will sincerly apDreciate your co- 


operation in helping me give the proper recognition tp this 

REC- 55 Jdo- 37- hk — 

great scientist and American. Below I have listed the 

_ - FEB 28 1961 

facts that may be helDful to you; a 

EX.-/ 4 ^ 

1. Born in 1856 at Smiljan, Crotia, now Yugoslavia 
?. Came to America in 1884 and was employed for a 

short time with the Edison Co. at Orange, N.J. ^ 
3. uied on January 7, 1943 at New Y'ork city 

Thanking you for your time and co-operation that I have 
taken, I remain. 



hi C 


Sincerlv Y'ours 



received, and the interest which prompted you to write is . •* 5 
appreciated. 



Tolson 

Poisons _ 

Mohr 

Belmont _ 
Callahan . 

Conrad 

DeLoach- 

Evans 

Malone 

Rosen 

Tavel 


Trotter 

W.C. Sullivan . 

Tele. Room 

Ingram 

Gandy 


In response to your inquiry, I wish to advise 
that our files reflect that the effects of Or. Nikola Tesla 
were impounded, after his death, by the Office of Alien 
Property of the Department of Justice spd net by the FBL 
Since we did not participate in the handling of Dr; Tesla's 
effects, we are unable to supply the information yon desire. 


^ " 


MAILED 10 

FEB 2 31961 

COMM-FBI 


Sincerely yours. 


• £ 



John Edgar Hoover 
■> ^Director 

, . * • - * .. •* r. . - . r . t ■ . ^ f 

NOTE: No record could be located in Bufil^sidentlfiable with *y‘. y 
correspondent. Bufiie 100-2237 reflects that Dr. Tesla was a 
world-famous electrical inventor, ’and at the time of his death, all^v 
of his personal papers and eff ects ^ere believed jfang^rous to^t^e ^ 
country’s security if they fell into/authorized hands. :;The f ^pok, 
/f"Prodigal Genius, " by John i Vn'Nail/ alleges that took 

over a certain safe and o pen ed it, appropriating his ^roperty.^, y 
Bufiles clearly indicate that it was the Office of Alien Property of 
the Department who did so, and the above reply is forwa.r^e5‘ in 
answer to related inquiries. 


: RWE:jab//.*A- 

^ MAIL ROOM I I ^TjlLETYPE jS! T 

J 


□ 



i 






November 21, 1962 


Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Washington 25, D.C. 

Gentlemen: 

I an making a study, motivated out of personal curiosity, into the 

o 

life and works of Nikola Tesla* Mr. Tesla died on January 7, 1942 in the 
Hotel New Yorker. Since F.B.I. Operatives opened his safe and took his 
papers for examination, I wonder if these papers are available for perusal? 

If they are available, where would they be located, and are copies available 
to the public? 

I an a citizen of the United States, end have been cleared for security- — 
the latest one being for work on far Force Contracts for Eastman KodaJcl Company;/ 
Thank you very much for any information or help you may be able to 



1 


1 1 ‘ ‘ 


November 27, 1962 


bit 


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er 

Ctf CT 

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Tolsi 
Belmont 

Mohr 

Casper 

Callahan 

CcnnH 

DeLoach . 

Evans 

Gale 

H'jsen 

Sullivan _ 
Tavel 



NewvXprk l*f\L \ W0RW W ^ 

-jO f/ ■ 


2D 


Dear! 


Your letter of November 21st has been received. 



VI 

Ul 


In response to your inquiry, I would like to point 
out that the effects of Dr. Nikola Tesla were impounded, after 
his death, by the Office of Alien Property of the Department of 
Justice and not by the FBI. Since this Bureau did not participate 
in the handling of Dr. Tesla's effects, I am unable to supply the 
information you desire. 


Sincerely yours, 

J. Edfcar Hoover 

John Edgar Boover 
Director 



/n 


. * W) 

v'' 

w 


NOTE: Bufiles contain no record identifiable with correspondent. 
Bufile 100- 2237 shows that Dr. Tesla Was one of the world 1 s 
outstanding scientists in the electrical field, and at the time of 
his death, all of his personal papers and effects were believed 
dangerous to the country* s security if they fell into unauthorized 
hands. The book, "Prodigal Genius," by John J. O’Neil, alleges 
that the FBI took over a certain safe and opened it, ^appropriating 
Dr. Tesla's property. Bufiles clearly indicate $iai it was the Office 
of Alien Property of the Department. .which 'did so, and the above reply 
has be t en forwarded in answer to related inquiries. Dr. Tesla was 
born ih' Yugoslavia and died in New York City 1-7-43. 

EFT:blc (3) 


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TRUE COPY 

JScot^FB^UT 
10 March 1964. 


Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Washington 25, D. C. 

Dear Sirs, 

For some time, have been wondering about the matter 
of what was reported on the lat e Nikola U Tesla , the inventor. He died 
during early January 1943, while in residence at the Hotel New Yorker, 
New York City. Accounts have it that his belongings (papers, etc.) were 
studied. Would appreciate learning if anything *:an be learned about this. 

Am hoping to be on leave, and in Washington, along the third 
week of April. This is mentioned, in case it is possible to view anything 
relating to the question. 


Sincerely, 



< 



r 







March 18, 1964 



Your letter of March 10th has been received. 


b response to your inquiry, I would like to point out 
that the effects of Dr. Mikola Tesla were impounded, after his death, 
by the Office of Alien Property of the Department of Justice and not 
the FBI. Since we did not participate in the handling of Dr. Tesla' s 
effects, I am unable to supply the information you desire. * 


rn 



Sincerely yours. 


_§■ Btfgar Roow 

John Edgar Hoover 
Director 


CD 




^7 


b^i * 


& -A. 




Tolson _ 
3el:r,cnt _ 

Mohr 

Ccsper __ 
Call ah or, 

Corrcd 

DeLccrh 


rarer, 

Suiiiv. 

-1 


o 

o 

* 




£ 


/NOTE: No record could be located in Bufiles identifiable with correspondent. 
/Bufile 100-2237 reflects that Dr. Tesla was a world-famous electrical inventor, 
and at the time of his death, all of his personal papers and effects were believed 
dangerous to the country's security if they fell into unauthorized hands. The 
book, "Prodigal Genius," by John J. Cf Neil, alleges that the FBI took over a 
certain safe and opened it, appropriating his property. Bufiles clearly indicate 
that it was the Office of Alien Property of the Department whu^did so, and the 
above reply is forwarded in answer to related inquiries. 


.SAWtmc . , 

* ; ’ 


( 3 ) 


7 MAh' 






TRUE COPY 


According to "Prodical Genius, Nikola Festa” 
by J. J. O'Neil (a book) some papers were taken from the 
safe of Mr. Festa about 1945 yr. Is this true. If so are the 
papers declasified yet? If so may I obtain a copy? 

Zip 62095 

blC Wood River, 111. 


^cr>rJL 

^ ^ ct/ro*<£ 

Jijl -A* Cr ' a-r*' -£&> jn*/L*s*, 


/**f S' 


£r-i 


</^ ^ /• 




3 JUN 23 1964 


^£<T - ?,a -' * 


. , , ...cp^M^TlOW COMJWNED 
.iUi.HU v ;I> .roicrp^ 


OME- 


L3-R.8 




June 22, 1964 



In response to^your inquiry, I would like to point out 
that the effects o f Dr. NlkolaTesla w ere impounded, after hl6 death, 
by the Office of Alien Property of the Department of Justice and not 
by the FBI. Since we did not participate in the handling of Dr. Tesla's 
effects, I am’ unable to furnish the Information you desire. 



Sincerely yours, 

. 0 . Edgar Hoover 



t 


:n 


NOTE: No record could be located in Bufiles identifiable with correspondent. 
Bufile 100-2237 reflects that Dr. Tesla was a world-famous electrical invento: 
and at the time of his death, all of his personal papers and effects were 
believed dangerous to the country's security if they fell into unauthorized handt 
The book, ’’Prodigal Genius,” by John J. O'Neil, alleges that the FBI took ovei 
a certain safe and opened it, appropriating his property. Bufiles clearly 
indicate that it was the Office of Alien Property of the Department which did s( 
and the above reply is forwarded in answer to related i nn ill r i 

SAffiiufy (3) 


1 01 l\i M 


V 


y- 


To* 55 




OREGON STATl JNIVERSITY 


CORVALLIS, OREGON 97331 


SCHOOL OF SCIENCE 


Reply to: DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL SCIENCE 

March 28, 1967 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
Department of Information 
9th Street § Pennsylvania Aven, N.W. 
Washington 25, D. C. 20535 

Dear Sirs: 


"i INFORMATION CONTAINED 
"'FIN IS UNCLASSIFIED/} . 
DATF 7-3 -ZQ 


I am a student of the history of science at Oregon State University, and 
I am attempting to write a research paper on a very eccentric scientist 
who died in 1943. His name was Nikola^Tesla, a naturalized American of 
Serbian extraction, and he died Tn his hotel room in New York City on 
January 8, 1943. 


During the years leading up to World War II, Nikola Tesla supposedly 
invented a "Death Ray" which could destroy several hundred aircraft. Mr. 
Tesla was a very prolific and creative genius during his early years but 
gradually became something of a crackpot in his old age. As a student of 
the history of science, it is important to determine whether or not Tesla 
had any valid ideas in the plans for his death ray. Tesla invented the 
fluorescent light and also was one of the first scientists to discover 
X-Rays--hence there may be some possibility that his death ray might 
actually have been some crude type of laser. 


In Tesla's biography, "Prodigal Genius", by John J. O'Neill, the author 
states on page 277: 

"Operatives from the F.B.I. came to Tesla's hotel 
room shortly after his death and opened the safe 
in his room. They took the papers that it con- 
tained in order to examine them for a reported 
secret invention of possible use in the war..." 



I am trying to locate Tesla's secret and unpublished writings concerning 
his death ray. I have searched the literature quite thoroughly and' have 
found nothing. Does the F.B.I. still have these papers or can you tell 
where I might be able to obtain these writings for examination? Any 
assistance or information that you may lend me will be very much appre- 

ciated - ;oo- pa?.?- /£, 


Si 


p*C tik 


Sincerely yours, 


MAILED 30 


April 3, 1967 




Igo-^ 37- n. 


bIC 


bit 





lent oz General science 
Uregon Stat e Unive rsity 
Corvallis; 



INFORMATION contained 


Tour letter of March 28th has been received. 



% 


(, 


X' 


7 


cl son 


=\ 


In response to your Inquiry, the effects of 
Dr. Nikola Tesla were impounded, after his death, by the Office 
of Alien Property of the Department of Justice and not by the 
FBI. Since we did not participate in the handling of Dr. Tesla's 
effects, I am unable to furnish the information you desire. 

Sincerely yours, 

Wear Plover 




John Edgar Hoover 
Director 


X 


* 


NOTE: No record could be located in Bufiles identifiable with 
correspondent. Bufile 100-2237 reflects that Dr. Tesla was a 
world-famous electrical inventor, and at the time of his death, 
all of his personal pagers and effects were believed dangerous to 
the country's security, it they fell into unauthorized bands, . The 
book, "Prodigal Genibs,"’X by *John J. O'Neil, aHe$es that the FBI 
took over a certain safe and opened it, appropriating his property 
Bufiles clearly indicate that it was the Office qf» Alien PjropeYty of 
the Department which did so, and the aboven-eply^is forwarded in 








54 APR. H 1967' 


answer to related inquiries.^, 
ED:emm (3) 

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TRUE COPY 


Dear Mr. Hoover, 


• : r-''n'\m:i”: , mm, 1969 

i-:EfCcii4 IS UiJCLA^SJFIp 

DATF 


In the year 1943 the F. B. I. confiscated all of the papers 
and maybe some of the machines of physicist, Ni kola Tes la. These 
papers were his experiments and ideas at the time of his death. Accord- 
ing to the books I’ve read, these papers were confiscated on the grounds 
of the enemy getting ahold of his ideas and apply them to war machines. 


I have studied all of the material on this man and have 
found him to be more intelligent than the great "Brain” of his time, 
Thomas Edison. 


Why without Nikola Tesla there would be Westinghouse 
Company as we know today. This is the man who harnessed Niagara 
Falls, and was the one and only man who could see the possibilities of 
Alternating Current when men like Edison said "it would never work. " 

What I am wondering is, maybe these papers could be 
reclassified from whatever "Top Secret" classification they now have 
and be made available for study by the people who understand and can 
gain knowledge from them. 



I would be willing to pay for reproductions of his experiments 
if nothing else. He still has a great many ideas that have never been tried. 


It disturbs me to think that everyone has forgotten about 
the ideas of this man when he was so advanced for his time. 




I can say with assurance that no man alive can say that he 
knows all of Tesla's ideas. And studying other men's ideas is the way 
to advance in science faster. _ ^ f OO^ £-^.3 7 — ~ f /*. 


V % 

*/ i? 

I hope 

i ? - ' : , 

s-.-J 

/ f tr* 

' / * 
i 

/s/ 

■ * 

■ 



Thank You, / 0o _zTZn 

L1C. 

r airmount, Indiana '46928 





f 


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March 4, 1969 


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Fairmount, Indiana 46923 
Des 


, , pirnov^TiOtl CONTAINED 

bSclkwip ^ 



$ 

Your letter of February 25th has been received. 


In response to your inquiry, the effects of Dr. Nikola 
Tesla were impounded, after his death, by the Office of Alien Prop- 
erty of the Department of Justice and not by the FBI. Since we did 
not participate in the handling of Dr. Tesla's belongings, I am unable 
to furnish the information you desire. <A:pppyf of your communication 
has been referred to the Department of Justice. 

Sincerely yours, 

J. Edgar Hoover 


MAILED 10 

MAR 4 -1969 

COMM-FBI 


n o 
^ u 


Tolson 

DeLoach . 

s'ohr 

Bishop 

Casper 

Cailaharj . 

Conrad 

Ten 

cie 


Tave! _ 
Trotter . 
Teio. Re: 
HclT.es 
Gcr.iy . 


NOTE: Bufiles contain no record of correspondent. Bufile 100-2237 
reflects that Dr. Tesla was a world-famous electrical inventor, and 
at the time of his death, all of his personal papers and effects were 
believed dangerous to the country’s security if they fell into unauthor - 
ized hands. The book, "Prodigal Genius, ” by John J. O'Neil, alleges 
that the FBI took over a certain safe and opened it, appropriating his 
property. Bufiles clearly indicate that it was the Office of Alien Prop 
erty of the Department which did so, and the above reply is forwarded 
in answer to related inquiries. Copy of letter referred to Assistant 
Attorney General, Civil Division of the Department. 

LEE:jhs (3) ysffi 


— \ * 

M>Rf3f969 

MAIL ROOM I I TELE 


/ 


cor 


: UNIT 


□ 


A K 

l 





f 


bit 



Lincoln Park., 
April 8, 1970 


7035 


Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Director of Central Records 
Washington, D.C. 



Dear Sir: 


I am doing a research paper on Nickola Tesla. and would 
appreciate it if you could please provide me with the 
following information. 


That information being why did your Bureau impound his 
personal effects immediately after his death on 
January 7, 19^3- Secondly, could you provide a list 
of those effects, and lastly, when were they released 
and to whom were they given. 







REC I? 






/ 



kIC. 




In reply to your Inquiry of April 8th, the effects 
of Dr. Nikola Tesla were impounded, after his death, by the 
Office of Alien Property of the Department of Justice, and not by 
the FBI. Since we did not participate in the handling of Dr. Tesla's 
belongings, I am unable to furnish the information you desire. 

A copy of your communication has been referred to the Depart- 


ment of Justice for any help it may be able to offer. 


th 




Tolson _ 
DeLoach 
Walters _ 

Mohr 

Bishop _ 
Casper _ 
Callahan 
Conrod _ 

Felt 

Gale 

Rosen 

Sullivan 

Tavel 

Soyars 
Tele. 
Holme: 
Gandy 


MAILED 9. 

APR 14 1970 


Sincerely yours, 

t Edgar Hoover 

John Edgar Hoover 
Director ^ ^ 


COMM-FBI 




NOTE: Bufiles contain no information identifiable with correspondent. 
Bufile 100-2237 reflects that Dr. Ifbsla was a world-famous electrical 
inventor, and at the time of his death, all of his personal papers and 
effects were believed dangerous to the country's security if they fell 
into unauthorized hands. The book, "Prodigal Genius, " by John J. 

O'Neil, alleges that the FBI took over a certain safe and opened it, 
appropriating his property. Bufiles clearly indicate that it was the 
pffiee of Alien Property of the Department which did so, and the above 
- 0 froftfeggis forwarded in answer to related inquiries. Copy of letter referred 
^ voRlflfistant Attorney General, Civil Division of the Department. 

«A!L POC-.-dD TELETYPE UNIt P 1 «. 

MHB:cfj (3) CC. ^ IX'f* < 


A 



K7C 


Mr. J. Edgar Hoover, 

Director, 

Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
Washington D. C. 

Dear Sir, 


contained 

- ' , i j v 

'^rrr" 

^ ii I 




July 8, 1970 


u 


/i/; / i /e.-A_ 


I am writing this to you as I believe that most of the government is infil- 
trated with foreign agents, and there is a very good chance this could be of extreme 
importance fbr the defense of our nation. 

I met a nan a number of years ago that was raised on Long Island in the 
neighborhood where Mr. Tesla, inventor of the Tesla Coil, had his lab. He told me 
of Mr. Tesla 1 s notes blowing down the street when the junk men were dismantling his 
equipment. It would be a wonderful thing is some of these notes were salvaged and 
could be found. 


Mr. Tesla was at least a century ahead of his time. He sent radio signals 
around the world seventeen years prior to Mr. Marconi, who received the credit, and 
pioneered many fields. He was so far advanced that he had to invent a special math 
to keep up with his work. 


He, on several accasions talked before the scientists of the world and 
became very angry at their inability to understand him, and due to this was violently! 
disliked and didnot receive acknowledgement for his discoveries. One of the notes 7 
read by this man told of the radio transmission of electricity being brought to a / 
high degree of effiency. I 

I 

How here is the thing that should be investigated throughly. During my 
High School education, in the winter of either 19-25-26 or 1926-27, I made a 
currant events report on an article appearing in a small publication of that n-tme 
that was received weekly at the Troy Highschool, Troy Montana. It stated in tnis 
article that Mr. Tesla had made an offer to the Congress of the United States that 
if they would install radio transmission towers at every 150 miles around the border 
of this country, that he would install equipment that would broadcast a verticil 
plane of energy beyond the atmosphere through which no material object could pass 
as it would shatter or lose it*s monecular coohesion. It was refused. 


There is a good chance that this data is in the files of congress. What 
a defence, and boy do we need it. EI-UTJ’ REC m 3 /'V/ 7 I 

I have had some results along this line with structured vortices Oi mag- 
netic fields, but do not have the technical equipment or Joowl edge to carry out 
further experiments. The theory is quite simple and deals w it l7~par t iu ly 1 "ac eelerat- 
ion, and it works to the best of my knowledge. 

Sincerely 





July 15, 1970 



I 


\ 


I 


Tolson 

CeLoach . 

Walters 

Mohr 

Bishop 

Casper 

Callahcn . 

Conrad 

Felt 

Cole 

Rosen 
Sulliva 
Tavel 
Soyars 
Tele. P.oom . 

Holmes 

Gandy 


REC-3 io<> -2 ? 3 7 - / f 

m ... ,v F oavMlO«COtlTNH0) 

,c^|SUUCLftSS^^ 

Tour letter was received on July ISth and the interest 
which prompted you to write to me is appreciated. With respect to 
your inquiry, the effects of Dr. Nikola Tesla were impotmded, after 
his death, jjy the Office of Alien Property of the Department of Justice 

:C 

and the FBI did not participate in the handling of Dr. Tesla's belong- 
ings. ^dn addition, this Bureau is strictly an investigative agency of 
theiF^ederal Government and matters such as you mentioned do not 

O * 

come within the scope of this Bureau's authority. 

Sincerely yours, 

J. Edgar Hoover 


MAIUEQa 

JUL 1 5 1970 


John Edgar Hoover 
Director 


H 



a 



COMM-FBI 

NOTEnJUlliUL Lunlaife no record of correspondent. Bufile 100-2237 
reflects that Dr. Tesla was a world-famous electrical inventor, and, 
at the time of his death, all of his personal papers and effects were 
believed dangerous to the country's security if they fell into unauthorized 
hands. Bufiles indicate that the Office of Alien Property of the Department 
ajDpropriated his property and replies similar to the above have been used 
related inquiries. ^ ^ , 

jLnb^s) p ^ 

MAIL Pgfvr H” Ft FTY P E UNIT l 1 



i 



N ABN ASSET, MASS 
01861 


f 

bit 


6 DECEMBER 1971 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 


Dear Sir: 


I have recently begun a collection and reading Tile of all 
matters pertaining to Nikolir^Teala* In so doing I was amazed to find 
that upon his death; January 7, 1943, in NYC, your bureau confined 
his papers* May I ask If you still "have them In jail"* I am extremely 
Interested In his work(s) and am trying to establish my own "Tesla" 
library* Your assistance would be greatly appreciated* 


Very truly yours. 



16 DEC 15 1971 



nr ■tit; 


December 14, 1971 




Dear 



Your letter of December 6th has been received, 


In response to your inquiry, the effects of 
Dr. Nikola Tesla were impounded, after his death, by the 
Office of Alien Property of the Department of Justice and 
not by the FBI. We did not participate in the handling 
of Dr. Tesla ' b belongings in any way. Copies of your 
communication and my reply have been referred to the 
Department of Justice. 


Sincerely yours. 


.a 
> « 




Tolson 

Felt 

Rosen 

Mohr 

Bishop 

Miller. F.S. 

Callahan 

Caspor 

Conrad 

Da l bey 

Cleveland _ 

Ponder 

Bates 

T avel 
Walters 
Soyars 
Tele. Room 

Holmes 

Candy 



J. Edgar Hoover 

John Edgar Hoover 
Director 


NOTE: Bufiles contain no record correspondent. Dr. Tesla 

was world-famous electrical inventor, and at death, his 
effects believed dangerous to country's security. "Prodigal 
Genius," by John J. O'Neil, alleges FBI took safe and appro- 
priated his property. Above reply previously given to same 
inquiries. (100-2237) Material sent to the Assistant 
Attorney, Civil Division, of the Department. 


MLN : j am ( 4 ) 




J 

X 


2 11971 



*,,4 


j f / 7 

✓/A r/'Xb 

^ I ** ... - ■ £ 




'i »-’• 


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MAIL ROOM! I TELETYPE UNIT I I 



Federal Bureau Of Investigation 
Ninth Street and Pennsylvania 
Northeast Washington D. C. 20535 

Dear Sirs, 

<o 

Upon rea ding a biography on Nikola Tesla . I found the urge to 
read more on him and his works. At the end of the book it was 
stated that the F.B.I. went to his hotel room gathered up his 
papers and locked them in a vault. The thing I would like to 
know is the real reason they were locked up and if it would be 
possible to see some of these records and any other works of 
his. 

I can think of only one possible reason afe to cause of his 
records being locked up and that is because he was too far 
advanced for his time. This s ems to be the only logical 
solution, but, with technology much more advanced now than in 
his time it would seem likely that scientists take over where 
he left off. 

Please let me know If I can look at the records and if you can 
please answer my question of the real reason his records were 
locked up. 



KWs 


October 31, 1972 


/ flfl ~~ c^C?c? '/” £/ 




Your letter was received on October 26th. 


In response to your inquiry, the effects of Dr. Nikola 
Tesla were impounded, after his death, by the Office of Alien 
Property of the Department of Justice and not by the FBI. Since 
we did not participate in the handling of Dr. Tesla's belongings, 
I am unable to furnish the information you desire. I am forward- 
ing a copy of your communication and of this reply to the 
Department of Justice. 


Sincerely yours, 

L. Patrick Gray III 


Felt 

Baker 

Bates 

Bishop 

Callahan _ 
Clove! ami 

Conrad 

Dal boy 

•tonkins 



L. Patrick Gray, III 
Acting Director 


& 


Marshall 

Miller, K.S 

Ponder 

$<>> ars 

Walters 

Tele. Room 

Mr, Kinley 

Mr. Arn^J/0| 

Ms. Ik* 

Wt\. N 


NOTE: Correspondent is not identifiable in Bufiles. Bufile 100-2237 

ref lects,. that I)r. Tesla was a world-famous electrical inventor, and 
at the €ifoe o'f'hi^s death, all of his personal, papers and effects were 
believed dangerous to the country's security if they fell into 
unauthS&i-red hands. ‘"'-The book, "Prodigal Genius," by John J. O'Neil, 
alleges tWatOthe.FBI took over a certain safe and opened it, 
appropriating hi4^ property . Bufiles clearly indicate that it was 
the Office of Alien "Property of the Department which did so, and the 
above reply is forwarded in answer to related inquiries. Copy of 
letter referred to Assistant Attorney General, .Civil Division of 
the Department. . , 


yp 



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JB APR ^ 1913 


'its# 


April 11, 1973 





bX 



ML INFORMATION CONTAINED 

: EREIN IS UNCLASSIBHh 
DATE 

f 


Your letter was received on April 9th. 


In response to your inquiry, the effects of Dr. Nikola 
Tesla were impounded, after his death, by the Office of Alien Property 
of the Department of Justice and not by the FBL Since we did not 
participate in the handling of Dr. Tesla's belongings, I am unable to 
furnish the Information you desire. A copy of your communication and 
of this reply have been referred to the Department of Justice. 


Sincerely yours, 

• •• • : -:z? TZt 


!*. Felt 

Mr. Baker 

Mr. Callahan 

Mr. Cleveland 

Mr. Conrad 

Mr. Gebhardt 

Mr. Jenkins 

Mr* Marshall 

Mr. Miller. E.S. _ 

Mr. Soyars 

Mr. Thompson 

Mr. Walters 

Tele. Room 


L. Patrick Gray, HI 
Acting Director 

NOTE: Bufiles contain no record of correspondent. ^Bufile 100-2237 reflects 
that Dr. Tesla was a world-famous electrical inventor, and at the time of his 
death, all of his personal papers and effects were believed dangerous to the 
country's security if they fell into unauthorized hands. The book, "Prodigal 
Genius, " by John J. O'Neill, alleged that the FBI took over a certain safe and 
opened it, appropriating his property, feufiles clearly indicate that it was the 
Office of Alien Property of the Department which did so, and the above reply 
is forwarded in answer to related inquiries. /Copy of letter referred to the 
Assistant Attorney General, Civil Division pi the Department!) 


/ 


cam:cmc 

C/tT-c- 


(4) 


li 


:C 

iJ 




.!? 

• J (~ 


ieie* rvoum 

Mr. Kinley J • } 

Mr. Armstrong — ^ / // / 


Mr. Mintz /* ... 

Mrs. Secr.an MAIL ROOM PH 


m- 

TELETYPE UNIT > 








tn* 


4 / 




r ederal Bureau of Investigation 
Department of Justice 
Washington, D. C. 


Gentlemen : 




r 1 ■■ 

V ^ 


I would like to knov^J.f any microfilm or other 
reproductions of f-jlkola Tesla * s notes and papers exist at 
your office. Tesla was a famous scientist who died in 
New York City. The Federal Bureau of Investigation entered 
his safe shortly after this to remove his papers for 
examination for the war effort. After the war the papers 
were offered to any group that would start a museum to 
house them. No one accepted and the papers were finally 
sent to the Tesla Museum in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, sometime 
in the e?rly 1950's, possibly Just before 195^* Tesla was 
the inventor of all ac motors and the polyphase system, as 
well as all flourescent and neon lamps. He was a major 
pioneer in the early days of radio and discovered many 
of the early principles of radar. He declined nomination 
of a Nobel Prl z e. He was a naturalised citizen of America 
and said he valued his citizenship papers above all his 
awards and possessions. Despite this, all his papers were 
sent to another nation. 

I would like to examine some of his papers from 1899 and 
later without having to fly to Yugoslavia. I have only *.y. 

seen a condesr. sed copy of his research from Colorado 
Springs, but am unable to obtain copies. The principles 
and equipment are rather out-of-date and well-known, but still 
useful in my research. 

I would greatly appreciate help in this matter. 


bit 



P.S. Tesla died in January of 19^3 and shortly after AWry 
the papers were removed from his safe. The original 
copies of these papers were sent abroad prior to 195^, as 
I believe it was in that year the Yugoslavs founded the 
Tesla Museum (not to be confused with the Tesla Institute) 



i 



June 27, 1973 



In response to your inquiry, the effects of 
Dr. Nikola Tesla were impounded, after his death, by the 
Office of Alien Property' of the Department of Justice and 
not by the FBI. Since we did not participate in the 
handling of Dr. Tesla's belongings, I am unable to furnish 
the information you desire. A copy of your communication 
and of this reply have been referred to the Department 
of Justice. 






1 


X 

Os 

* 


/ 


Sincerely yours, 

William D* Ruckelshaus 

William D. Ruckelshaus 
Acting Director 


I ah an — 
veland _ 

rad 

hardt 

Uns 

>hall __ 
?r, E-S. 

ITS 

npson „ 

?rs 

K>m 


J OTE:; Bufiles indicate one letter to correspondent dated 
-15-66 in reply to his inauiry regarding the Air Force's 
roject Blue Book and UFO sigh tings .'^Bufile 10 0-2237 reflects 
hat Dr. Tesla was a world-famous electrical inventor, and 
at the time of his death, all of his personal papers and effects 
were believed dangerous to the country's security if they fell 
into unauthorized hands. The book, "Prodigal Genius," by 
John J. O'Neill, alleged that the FBI took over a certain safe 
and opened it, appropriating his property. Bufiles clearly 
indicate that it was the Office of Alien Property of the 
Department that did so, and the above reply is forwarded in 
answer to related inquiries. Copy of letter referred to the 

Assistant Attorney General, Civil Division of the Department.) 
"mn : cmc ( 4 ) . i 


>' ;C. 


/ 


igton . 



-I 1 




MAIL ROOM TELETYPE UNIT L_) 






EjlCLOSORS 


QlCrrHcb JJbiaies Jtbenale 


June 26, 1973 


Respectfully referred to: 


Congressional Liaison 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Department of Justice 
Washington, D. C. 20530 


« 

.J 


*r- Hal^l 



Mr. Felt . 


Mr. Bairei . 

*Mr. CallgSas _ 
Mi. Clevetuad 

Mr. Coined 

Mi. Geb^crd: _ 

Mr. let.k*7 ! » 

Mr. Martha!/ _ 
Mr. Miiiet. c S _ 
Mr. Scyrjrx 

Mr. Tbcrapsao 

Mr. Ws;*r* 

Tel®. Ho^r 

Mr. Bc:-e 

Mr. Earn*.; _ 

Mr. fcv.N ;; _ 

Mr. h?eri>erra 
Mr. Ccm&r _ 

Mr. 

Mr. Cardiff 

Mrs. Hogan _ 


/ 


Because of the desire of this office to be 
responsive to all inquiries and communications, 
your consideration of the attached is 
requested. Your findings and views, in 
duplicate form, along with return of the 
enclosure, will be appreciated by 


Form #2 


Senator Bob-.Packwood 
ATTN : ^idlanlHQlmer 






O - *> 

7 Ittft t gS 1973 f 



uJ'. 


CORf 



SPJ 




wn» f 'T 




f 


20 June 1973 


Bear Senator Packwood, 

/ . 

Though in Alaska temporarily working on a military contract, I still consider myself ’ 
an. OrkgoX resident , hence .it is to you i,he$ I i. 

'~'A ».•:•• ' 4 

During ay days at Reed College, I became interested in a fascinating Czech physicist-, 
N lcoiai^Tesla, Proffessor Tesla emmigratod r,<j this country in tl c . twenties, I 
believe, ana did some of his most origin? Ignore * Tesla had a peculiar bent of mind, 
in his younger days he was often called a nad scientist, and did not publish 
extensively when he came to the US. Most, of the extant primary material i.s in 
untranslated Czech* Tesla was. however, an cxlv/rslvo not? taker. I fee thought it 
strange that upon his death, "no nr of his rotes fru ills American period ovrr 
•op reared* Upon discussing phis with a friend, T was informed that nil of !ir. Tesla's 
rates were confiscated by the FBI. I canrot conceive hov; those notes on physics 
and electricity can in icy way endanger the national safety. It seems that Mr. 

Hoover in his zeal, had confiscated material whoso only sin was a radical approach 
to science* There is indication that much of : Vofessor Tesla's later work concerned 
r, vary novel approach to time theory. Heedless to say, it has been radical approaches 
to physics that have oeen our greatest scientific advances i n modern times, 
vis. Einstein, Heisenberg, et al. 


I was wondering if your office might be able to determine if these papers are 
still extant, and if so, see to it that the public has access to them* It would 
be a shame to see all of Nicolai Teslas work to have been in vain. 

Please 
liberal 



) 



'ENCLOSURE 


> 


July 5, 1973 


REC-15 


ST-105 


, A O - 


7 -7-W 


COIlTWMEO 


Honorable Bob ' P&ckwood 
United States Senate 
Washington, D. C. 20510 




L7C. 


Dear Senator Packvood : 

# 

This ia/to acknowledge receipt of your communication 
enclosing a letter from your constituent, 

who is temporarily employed in Alaska. 


dated 
Mr 


In response to ifeJ^I^IHIBinquiry, central files 
cf the Federal Bureau of Inve^^at^n indicate that the 
effects of Dr. Nikola Tesla were impounded after his death 
by the Office of Alien Property of the Department of Justice 
and not by the FBI. Since we did not participate in the 
handling of Dr. Tesla’s belongings, I am unable to furnish 
the information you desire. 



I am 


returning your enclosure as you requested. 


Sincerely yours, 

William D. Rue ;»M“ uS 
William D. Ruckelshaus 
Actincr Director 


Enclosure 


fif 


. Felt 

. Baker 

. Callahan 

. Cleveland _ 

. Conrad 

. Cebhardt 

. .Jenkins _ 

. Marshall __ 
. Miller. E.S. 

. Soyars 

. Thompson _ 

. Wallers 

fie. Room 

. Baise 

. Bamcs 

. Borers 

. HeriiiRion _ 

. Conmy 

. Mintz 

. Hard ley 

s. Hogan 


1 - Portland Enclosures (2) HJ* 

1 - Congressional \ Services Office - Enclosures (2) . 

NOTE: Buf iles^evea^jy^ioj^cor^^^ correspondence with Senator j^TO 

Pagjcwdod . Mr .flHHHj^^Hj^HMjHBFis not identifiable in Bufiles 
Bufile was a world-famous 


Bufile 100-223 fly la was a world-famous 

electrical /inven- -or , and at the time of his death, all of his 


personal ^pkp^i's Juid effects were believed dangerous to the countr 
security they fell into unauthorized hands. The book, "Prodig 
Genius," byyJoim J. O'Neill, alleged that the FBI took over a ce 
safe and opened it, appropriating his property. Bufiles clearl* 
cipdicate that it was the Office of Alien Property of the Depar' 
idiB^$*/3nd the above reply is forwarded in ..answer to r r 
inquiries/^/ v ,v* / 

/RUk.OTdSaCla )' TELETYPE UNIT CZD (V]/ [ 
























July 19, 1973 



b7 <L 



response to your inquiry, the effects of Dr. Nikola Tesla 


were impounded, after his death, by the Office of Alien 
Property of the Department of Justice an? not by the FBI. 
Since we diu #£tt participate in the handling of Dr. Tesla s 


I 


belongings, I aid unable to furnish the information you 
desire. A copy of your communication and of this reply have 


been referred to the Department of Justice- 


Assoc. Oir. 

Asst. Du.: 

Admin. _____ _____ 

Comp. Syst. 

Files & Com. 

Gen. Inv. 

Ident. 

Inspection . 

Intell. 


Loborotory 

Pion. & Evol. 

Spec. >nv. 

Training 

Lego! Cown. 

Cong. Serv. 

Core. & Crm. 

Research 

Press 0«. 


Telephone Rm. 

Director Sec'y 



Sincerely yours, 
C, M. Kelley 




Clarence M. Kelley 
Director 

NOTE: Bufiles contain no record of correspondent. (Bufile 100-2237 

reflects that Dr. Tesla was a world-famous electrical inventor, and 
at the time of his death, all of his personal papers and effects 
were believed dangerous to the country's security if they fell into 
unauthorized hands. The book, "Prodigal Genius," by John J. O'Neill 
alleged that the FBI took over a certain safe and opened it, 
appropriating his property. Bufiles clearly indicate that it was 
Allien Property of the Department which did so, and 
Lylis forwarded in answer to related inquiries. Copy 
b/dred to the Assistant Attorney General, Civil Division 
ierit . ) 


the Office of 
the above 
of 

of the Depart 
jkbreme ( 4 y-\ 


rt 

letter ret 


sit. r. 


\ 

>t- -y: .' ' u 

\ J - r \ 

MAIL ROOM I Zj TELETYPE UNIT [ i 


6 



4 


Clarence M. Kelley - : \ v';^ v v 
Director 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Washington D.C. 20535 


Dear Mr. Kelley, 


Qtiar as on. 




»! !. INFORMATION CONTAINED 
'HEREIN IS UNCLASSIFIED n 
DATE 


Thank you for your letter of the 19th "of- July. : :.I 
appreciate the information about the Office of Alien; Propw^^^^^^ : r :. ; -' 
and its connection with the impounding of the effects of 

O . / ; ’ . v. ' • \ V > ;• vy. :*J> ' ' 

Nikola Tesla. In my letter of the 16th I did not mean to im- y A".';- ••v' < 
ply the FBI had impounded hio effect a, ^ as I was: a^are^of.;t^J^^^^^ 
O.A.P.s general part in the affair. The fact -'remains ;:ttiat:^to»^ 
the best of my knowledge* ' it WAS agents of the FBI jtoo^did^iri^^ 
fact break into his safe only hours after his death’ ,* ; and d id l 
remove the papers therein. Now, in so far as the Bureau was ;ji ^S'Z'K'r’ 
connected , I wish to understand that extent . I do appreciate j 
your refering my communication to the appropriate persons in ; 
the Just ice Department *••• but perhaps you could, a ee .that ;V the 
above mentioned connection of the Bureau could be further looked i -;U^A 
into. I am curious as to who asked the Bureau to perform such.an 
act, whether is was a person: in the 0. A. P. . or: whit, aAd on 


grounds they were carried they were -res ponsibie^i^^ 

Also, to what person were the perloined papers delivered? Names.* 
of the agents involved would be appreciated. As to what happened V \ 
to any other effects of his, that is probabl^)# question more ably _ / 

REC m/00- ^7-37- 

answered by the O.A.P., yet if Bureau agents participatedrdan.cau=: c==- 
they may have done so on other occasions. If the personp^whoQd fed 1973 
open the safe were NOT FBI agents, then we are faced with^the. _f act=^ 
that persons aparently posed as Bureau operatives, an even more 

interesting situation. Pebhaps this whets your own curiosity aboijf 

f •■? 5 CORRESPONDENCE 


/c 


1 llfl Hill! 'B 






• .• : . ; * ■ i . r ,*-•**. -■ • :• ' --V-. . . s - /■ ^V - •- *-'?■ J 

this affair, r’ Wgh on the surface It on r jaa' historic ; V. 
Interest. Are' youaware that 'before .the- 'yeartv j90Q:;he;'' : w 
able to transmit thousands of -’watts' ; of Yelectrj^ 
any point on the globe WITHOUT WIRES. This and other feats 1 
would make him a prime target for vested interest groups, . ; . 
notably the J . P . Morgan combine with whom he had ^connections. 

I am aware of the jweli earned .tradition; of the Bureau J WOT . 

serving any master: but the^common good, ap\ again- we have a r ■ 
curious point If indeed strings were pulled. Quite frankly ,; .3 ■ 

it looks as if someone went ' to' , a - lot of trouble to' see that K 
his ideas were 



at the expense of; rogues sable benef its to • t o' hi^nity^ps Ja ' * ‘ 
whole 



out of the air to run say a lightbulb with ONE wire? ? He ,did 
it, and much more. > My sincere thanks . for ". yourtthouj^^ 
attentions to these; matters. 
















August 2, 1973 


REC 


68 / # & ' 


/ — 




Your letter, which was received on July 30th, has 
been reviewed and I would like to point out that FBI Agents were 
not involved in removal of papers from the safe of Dr. Nikola 
Tesla, nor did we at any time have custody of his property. 


I realize there have been some written accounts 
that our Agents acquired Dr. Tesla’s belongings; however, these 
accounts are simply not true. You can be assured we were abso- 
lutely not responsible and there was no impersonation involved. 



Assoc. Oif. 

Asst. Dir.: 

Admin. - - 

Comp. Syst. 

Files & Com. 

Con. Inv. 

Idont. 

inspection _____ 
Intofl. 

Laborotory 

Plan. & Eval. 

Spec. Inv. 


Sincerely yours, 

Kelley. 

Clarence M. Kelley 
Director 

NOTE: Correspondent had written in mid-July and asked about the effects 
of Dr. Tesla and he was advised that the Office of Alien Property had 
participated in removing his effects from his hotel room. A copy of his 
communication was referred to the Department of Justice. Bufiles indicate 
clearly that after Dr. Tesla’s death some relatives opened the safe in his 
hotel room with the help of a locksmith and, thereafter, the Office of 
Alien Property confiscated all of his belongings. Bufile 100-2237 mentions il 
that the FBI was advised of the existence of this property; however, inasmucl 
as the Office of Alien Property was handling Dr. Tesla’s effects, the 
Bureau had absolutely no hand in the entire matter. 


Training 

Legal Coon. 

Cong. Serv. 

Corr. & Crm. 

Research 

Press Off. 

Telephone Rm. 

Director Sec'y 


MAIL 



£:ncr (3) 



J. 

y(.' f , 

ETYPE UNIT CHI 



June 9, 1975 


Federal Bureau of Investigation 
U.S. Department of Justice 
Washington D.C. 20535 

Sirs : 


We recently contacted the San Francisco ^31 
office and a review of their files revealed^^ 
information concerning the scientist NikolcVTesla 
or his papers which we understand to have been 
irnoounded. 


If you could make a thorough investigation-^ 
of all files and materials available to you, we 
would greatly appreciate the correspondence of 
any information that might be discovered. 



O' 

bit 


Atioc. 0 if. 

0«p. AD Ad m . 

D« p. AD ln». 

A**». Dir.: 

Admin. 

Comp. Sy*t. 

E*t. A (fo if* 

File* & Com. 

Gen. |nv. 

Ident. 

Inspection 

Intel I. 

Loborotory 

Plon. & Evot. 

Spec. In*. 



'un. : 


^■*-4 

100-33.31 - 3GX 


JUly 7, 1975 

v^e:asufL(^| 



This will acknowledge your letter of June 9th. 


In response to your inquiry, the papers of 
Dr. Mikola Tesla were lagwunded, after his death, by the 
Office of Alien Property of the Departnent of Justice. 

Sincerely yours, 

£*JH. Ke//ey 

Clarence M. Kelley 
Director 


1 - The Deputy Attorney General - En c l os ure * 
■ Attention t — S u s an - Hi Hewee g- 


NOTE: Bufile 100-2237 indicates that Dr. Tesla was a 

world famous electrical inventor, and at the time of his 
death his personal papers and effects were impounded by 
Office of Alien Property for national security reasons. 

Since Tesla* s death in 1943 the Bureau has received numerous 
inquiries about the disposition of his technical papers. 

The above reply is forwarded in answer to these inquiries. 
Bufiles contain no information identifiable with requesters. 


4bb : cgg._-> ’ (40 








\ ... 1. 


, MAILED 7 

I JULY 1975 

I -fat 

l, ////)■• 



c: — 


Rm. _ 



bit 


13 November 1975 


Mr. Clarence Kelley 

Director 

F.B.I. 

Washington, D.C. 20335 


Dear Mr. Kelley: 





In reply to the letter of 10 November from your office: 


I restate that I was not asking about the existence or 
non-existence of any investigative information an Nikola 
( JLkjbJji, but on his technical papers seized on his death 
in 19^3 and reported in the papers of that time. 


The reason given in the reply from your office, the 
second paragraph, as to why I cannot get any inform- 
ation on Tesla's papers makes no sense in itself or 
in reply to my inquiry. The thirfrd paragraph stating 
the conditions under which a search will be made 
is a clear bureaucratic circumvention of the Freedom 
of Information Act and an excuse on the part of the 
individual handling my request forTSoing any work be- 
yond the drafting of a letter. Will it be the decision 
of your office to let the situation stand like this? 

/ 

As I stated in my first letter, I am following up the 
Tesla data for a magazine article. I am tempted to have / ' 
your reply of the l©th printed and run nationally as / 

an example of how bureaucratic manoeuring is used to / 

get around the FOIA. Does the bureau need more of this 
type of publicity? 

It is disheartening to see an agency entrusted to uphold 
the law using its resources to mock the law. 



1 


/ 




&57 

A 6 


o y 


- p 7 


November 26, 1975 





I INFORMATION CONTAINED 



t-Tj 


3- 


This will acknowledge receipt of your letter 
to the Bureau on November 14 th.^ 

In response to your inquiry, the papers of 
Dr. Nikola Tesla were impounded, after his death, by 
the Office of Alien Property of the Department of 
Justice. 

Sincerely yours, 

C. M. Keitel 

Clarence M. Kelley 
Director 


1 - The Deputy Attorney General - Enclosure 
Attention: Susan M. Hauser 




A«soc. Dir. — 
Dep. AD Adm 

Drp. AD Inv. 

A*s». Dir.: 

Admin. 

Comp. Sjr»*. _ 
E*t. Affoir* _ 
File* & Com. 

Gen. |n». 

Ident. 

Inspection 

Infell. 


NOTE: Bufile 100-2237 indicates that Dr. Tesla was 

a World famous electrical inventor, and at the time 
of his death his personal papers and effects were 
impounded by Office of Alien Property for National 
. Security reasons. Since Tesla's death in 1943 the 

inquiries about the 
papers . The above 
to these inquiries. 


Bureau has received numerous 
disposition of his technical 
reply is forwarded in answer 


\ / 


fit 



(5) 


Loborotory 

Plon. & Evol. . 

Spec. Inv. 

Troin.ng 


Loflol C oun. 

Telephone 


DfTTa^S9a^ 


ROOM CZ3 

’M ■ 


TELETYPE UNIT 











. I 

Ml 

A 


.<?! ? l 


GPO : 19“ 5 O - 569-920 


' ! • f RbUTIN*G AND TRAnIwVtAL SLIP 

ACTION 

* TO (Name, office symbol or location) 

Alan McCreight 
Rm. 5435 - JEH 


■1 

OATC 

coordination 

2 

initials 

riLC 

OATC 

information 

3 


NOTC ANO 
RETURN 

OATC 

PCR CON 
VCRSATION 

4 

INITIALS 

see MC 

OATC 

SICN ATURE 


REMARKS 

bX 



Do NOT use this form as a RECORD of approvals, concurrences, 
disapprovals, clearances, and similar actions 


FROM (Name. office symbof or location) 

Susan M. Hauser 


OATC 

10/21/75 


2145 


OPTIONAL FORM 41 

AUGUST 1967 

GSA FPMR ( 4ICFRJ 10 0 11.206 


e48— 1«— 81894-1 


652-103 


ORO 


5041-101 


















/ 


>// 



bid. 

Kensington, Md. 20795 
17 October 1975 


Freedom of Information Act Request 


Deputy Attorney General 
U.S. Department of Justice 
Washington, D.C. 20535 


Gentlemen: 



I am writing an article for a magazine on early twentieth 
century inventors, end want to obtain information on some 
papers o f Niko J a^^e&l J that- were seized by the FBI on his 
death in 1943. . . / ) u. '•//. 


Tesla invented a number of electrical devices and because 
of the war and because Tesla was born a Yugoslavian national, 
it was probably considered a measure of preventitive safety 
to hold in safekeeping papers that might have any bearing on 
national security. 



I would like to find out: 1) if the FBI still has the papers; 

2) if they do have the papers, what must be done to see them; 

3) if they do not have the papers, who does have them or what 

happened to them? _. of7 

< 00 --32 37 - <2 % 



i : 

DAT 


' 11 AT ION CONTAINED 


1 

'V ! 






November 10,-1975 







vi INFORMATION CONTAINED 
IS UNCLASSIFIED^ 
DATE _2Lii£a BY-< ^yW ?-^s 


This is to acknowledge receipt of your Preedom of 
Information-Privacy Acts (FOIPA) request forwarded to the FBI 
by the Department of Justice on October 22nd . ^ 



¥ 


In response to your request for files pertaining 
to Nikola Tesla, please be advised that in order to preserve 
the privacy of an individual who may be the subject of a 
similar inquiry, it has been necessary for the FEI to maintain 
the practice of not indicating whether we do or do not have 
such information in our files. 

If you can provide notarized authorization '-from 
Mr. Tesla' 8 next of kin directing us to release to you any 
information our files may contain concerning him, we shall 
thereafter search our files and advise you accordingly. 

Since we have not conducted a search of our files, 
please do not infer that we do or do not have the information 
you requested. 


Sincerely yours. 


A>t««. Dir. 

D«p. AD Adm. _ 

Dep. AD lev. 

Ass*. Dir.: 

Admin. 

Comp. Syst. 

£■». Affairs 

F tlct & Com. 


1 - 


C. M. Kelley 

Clarence M. Xelley 
Director 

The Deputy Attorney General - Enclosure 
Attention: Susan M. Hauser 





✓ 




CPO : O - 569*920 



April 20, 1976 


Mr. Clarence Kelly 

Director 

F.B . I . 

Washington, DC 


Dear Mr. Kelly: 

Mr. Allen and Mr. Ruchlehaus, former acting Director of the 
FBI, contacted me in 1973 regarding the unavailability of 
American microfilm records of Nikola Tesla 's unpublished diary 
(now in the Belgrade museum, arranged by month per folder). 



At the time I discounted the possibility that these unpublished 
discoveries had military significance. But because of experiments 
now under way at Hill AFB, I now suspect such military 
applications exist and feel it imperative that you be notified, 
particularly in view of the fact that the Soviets have primary 
access to the entire collection. 


Two photos of each page exist. 

After Tesla's death, scientists from the Navy and OSS performed 
a cursory examination of the diary and notes, which if my 
memory serves me correctly, was one month long, hardly enough 
time to decipher Tesla's torturous handwriting. Though Tesla 
wrote in English, his penmanship was small, blurred, and as 
difficult to translate as a foreign language. 



According to the museum director (1971), the Soviets had made 
copies of some portions, but not the Colorado Springs diary, 
which numbers 500 pages, 20 that directly pertain to ball 
lightning, and 20 or so relevant to the equipment construction. 

(We copied the most significant portions, but feel more exists ^ j 

- FX-115 REC-52 / r r - * VW 

iLhave^heep ozu four- yfear«?s*aye< 

fust completed an article fcfr my magazine, EDN (an electrical 
engineering magazine), but only with the very recent receipt 
of an unpublished manuscript from John J. O'Neill's book 
(PRODIGAL GENIUS) did I place credence on Tesla's later claim v/ 
to military applications. Incidentally, some of O'Neill's * M! 
descriptions were inaccurate and exagerated, as we have exce ed ed^ ^ 
Tesl§J^9esults and are familiar with the experiments 
rate, fnere, three possible military applications. 




At any 




r 1 W. 


wj? 



- 2 - 


First, Tesla claimed that the lightning balls (which destroyed 
his equipment) could be used to destro^alrcraft . I have 
talked to AF personnel --such as ^^^^^^^^Hengineer at 
Micro Networks, who saw one ins id^^^^^^^^in flight--and 
found AF personnel fear these "rf balls,' 1 as they call them. 



Second, it is a suspicion of mine that ball lightning, if 
injected with lithium, could produce a cheap fusion bomb. 

Third--and this may be no more than a suspicion--the propulsion 
mode of ball lightning involves electro-gravitic interaction, 
by which means air vehicles of revolutionary configuration may 
be constructed. There are no presently -known laws of physics 
that can account for the propulsion (400 mph or so when following 
an airliner). Other hitherto unsuspected applications may 
exist . 


None of these applications were the goal of Project Tesla, 
which centered on producing ball lightning as Tesla did and 
studying it as a plasma confinement technique for fusion 
reactors. Incidentally, Tesla's claim to setting up standing 
waves on the earth's surface (wireless power) was erroneous 
and involved techniques similar to Project Sanguin^^that 
is, using the earth's atmosphere as a waveguide^^^HHj^H is 
aware of our research) . 


b~l C 


/ 
! 
i 

bit j 

/ 

P.S. By a copy of this letter, along with the enclosures, 

I am notifying the C.I.A. 



Enclosures: 2 


9 



* DI’SiGiV NEWS 


. v. . 

\\ '• 


//'"V 


r^rr l 

/ / J'S*'** ~ CS j 

/ . ' ..' f *af ./-.?* : \ ' 

[**-*'/ y ^ f y 1 • 

•" /< 

f —.s/V * r f( 

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p 

■7 : 

;» «; 

). j 

\h 




v.a v:~. 

I^V^K; 


\ ^ X 

\\’ A 

\p. - 1 



Fusion energy: will experiments 
in ball lightning provide the key? 


Paul Snigier, Associate Editor 

In the vast and empty hangar 
where the first atomic bomb was 
assembled, a man-made light- 
ning storm is now being un- 
leashed. The voltages of these 
lightning bolts — 20 million 
volts — arc the highest discharge 
voltages ever produced by man. 

Project Tpsfa, headed by 
Robert K. Colka and Dr. Robert 
YV. Bass, is an attempt to 
artificially duplicate one of 
nature's rarest and most terrify- 
ing phenomena — ball lightning. 
The experiments arc based upon 
the unpublished notes of Nikola 
Tesla, who, in 1899 at his 
Colorado Springs laboratory, 
used a secret magnifying trans- 
miller to produce 1.5-in. light- 
ning balls that floated for TO sec. 

The energy surplus 

Many physicists, including the 
eminent Dr. James Tuck, found- 
er of the U.S. fusion program, 
believe* that the lightning ball 
holds the key to a fantastic. 


cheap and endless energy 
source — fusion power, or the 
energy source used by the stars 
and sun. The fuel is deuterium, 
or heavy water, that can be 
inexpensively extracted from 
ocean water to provide mankind 




Highest voltage continuously oscillating 
damped-wave lightning generator (ever 
produced by mankind) creates a 
current of 1100A at 12.5 MV! Subsequent 
improvements raised this to a peak 
current of 2200A at 20 MV. Further 
improvements could conceivably pro- 
duce bolts that exceed natural lightning 
(100 MV)! 


i • 




T”~! 




I • J ■ i - 

. * /» ‘. 7 - r 


“I/-! 





17 


wish millions of years o* ' •>'. 

• Unfortunately , prog. _ in 
fusion research, which has 
centered on magnetic confine- 
ment and laser implosions, has 
been frustrating!) slow and full 
of unpleasant surprises; and 
scientists warn that success 
could be as far off as four 
decades! But it these promising 
experiments under way * f Wcn- 
dover, UT, arc successful, ..aw 
unexpected confinement 
technique . could unleash Ihis 
energy source. 

In search of nature's secrets... 
Ball lightning, a glowing 
sphere of red, orange or yellow 
plasma, often materializes dur- 
ing lightning storms and floats 
about, often against a strong 
wind. The ball may bounce 
along the floor and, on occa- 
sion, the sphere will "slip" 
through glass without breaking 
it. (The author recently investi- 
gated one such case in a 
hospital, in which the lights 
were damaged.) At times it 
materializes inside or even 
outside aircraft in flight, seem- 
ingly impervious to deformation 
from the wind force. 


Witnesses of ball lightnir 
have included such notables as 
Niels Bohr and Victor Wciss- 
kopf, the Director of the MIT 
Physics Department. Another 
witness was Secretary of State 
Dean Achcson, who reported 
seeing it cross the breakfast 
table aboard the presidential 
plane. 

The accidental formation of 
ball lightning has been observed 
about once per year for the past 
decade inside building 985 at Hill 
AF Missile Radiographic Facility, 
UT. The volleyball-size fireballs 
drop out of the space adjacent to 
the high voltage supply of the 25 
Mcv linear accelerator. 

The ball of blue fire floats 
down to the floor, rolls around 
randomly and then rises again to 
the power-supply area where it 
dissipates without detectable 
damage. Despite troubleshoot- 
ing, no explanation can be 
found for this occurrence. 

On one occasion, lightning 
struck the building — a large 
concrete structure with a 60-lt. 
ceiling inside — and, simultane- 
ously, an intense sphere of firt 
the size of a tennis ball formed 
above the conduit on the wall at 


arly shoulder level. It moved 
aiong the wall for a distance <•) 
some 30 ft., floated out and * 
around the neck and shoulder f 
of a person standing near the 
wall, moved back to the wall and 
continued along for several feet 
until il intercepted a duple * 
outlet on the conduit. At this the 
ball exploded, causing elec- 
trical damage throughout. / 

V 

A new state of matter? 

No presently known laws of 
physics can account for the 
stability and bouncing of fire- 
balls unless it includes surface 
tension. This hitherto unob- 
served state of matter is a new 
concept, since plasmas have 
never previously exhibited such 
strong surface tension. Also, 
presently known laws cannot 
account for the propulsion. 

Project Tesla has developed a 
rigorous mathematical model of 
the lightning ball's absolute, 
asymptotic, fluid-dynamical sta- 
bility. Initial computer studies 
indicated a density range of 
10 n -10 M cm’ 1 , with a tempera- 
...v, ' 10‘-10 H °K — or 
seven times hott^. 
sun! □ 


...e 





* , £ i t 

j 9 . 


* * * 


Chapter 34 

• Ur’-^VW; '*C *UO J •f^UV.'V-c/ ’•' 

• 1 TE r . TRIES TO PREVENT WdRLD a, II, , , .. 

- - • Tt>Vw^-. s >Aiei ! h kocK .• O /V *> 

I _ # . . ^ i ^ VC* ^ iv^H. >■ ^ 

. \<hen Tosli was talking as a scientist no was opposed to zc~'r ‘rV^\ :# 
war 3 on moral, economic and all practical and theoretical grounds* 1 
But, like most scientists, when ho stopped thinking as a scientist, -w ;r 
and let his emotions rule hl3 thoughts, he found exceptions in 'ro 
which he felt somo wars and situations were justifiable. As a ' 
scientist he was unwilling to have the discoveries of scientists u.N* »~ 
applicd to the pruposes of v.ar ‘makers, hut when, the emotional phase c^V 
of his nature took the ruling position he was then willing to apply* <■»*•*•* 
his genius to devising measures that would prevent wars by supplying / 
protective devices* {Wp-sl •„* 

o* . ^ - ^ 

This attitude is exemplified in the following statement •-<"** '■«* 
which he prepared in the twenties but did not publish: «//, 


■ >~it 


“At present many of the ablest minds are trying to devise 
expedients for preventing a repetition of the awful conflict which is 
only theoretically ended and the duration and main issues of which I 
correctly predicted in an article printed in the Sun of December 20, 
1914. The League i3 hot a remedy but, on the contrary, in the opinion 
of a number of competent men, may bring about results. just the oppo- 
site. It Is particularly regrettable that a punitive policy was 
adoptod in framing the terms of peaco because a few years hence it 
will be possible for nations to fight without armies, ships or guns, 
by weapons far more terrible, to the destructive action and range of 
which there is virtually no limit. Any pity at any distance whatso- 
ever from the onemy can be destroyed by him and no power on earth can 
stop bin from doing so. If we want to avert an impending calamity and 
a stato of things which may transom this glooe ~nto an inferno, wc 
should push the development of flyi>ig machines and wireless transmission 
of. energy without an instant’s delay and with all the power and re- 
sources of the nation." 


Tesla saw preventative possibilities in his new Invention 
v/hich embodied "death ray" characteristics and which was made several 
years after the foregoing statement was written. He saw It -providing 
a* curtain of protection which any country, no natter how small, could 
use as a protection against invasion, '‘bile he might offer it as a 
defensive 'weapon,- however, there would he nothing to stop military 
men from using It' as a weapon of offense* 

While I did not know the nature of Tesla’s plan I was con- 
vinced that It did embody many discoveries that v;ould be of fiommer- 
clal value, and these were the angles he should seek to deyelop. I 
folt tht.t if he could be induced to develop some minor phase of his 
work that v/ould have immediate commercial use he could derive an In- 
come from it which would enable him .to. proceed with his more elaocrate 
plans. To this end I sought to gain some insight into his thoughts, 
that would enable me to get a practical plan in operation. This was 
no secret -.to Tesla and he successfully parried every thrust Ijaade* 

The dourest conception I got, and that was largoly from 
scattered remarks, ana by making deductions from tbcin, concerned a 
possiblo manner in which ono phase of his curtain of protection 
might operate. This was a "war" angle and as such^-i.t,'dld not interest 

. /go 37 -' ey ') 



no,, but' since It ir.v<~' , ved "lightning balls," or ’Tiro balls, “ l v/us 
very curious. Fii * .llo had always fasclna . ±o t and I bad read 
everything I coulc ay my hands on about the: 

A fire ball is a strango phenomenon associated with light- 
ning. ^>orno of the energy of tits lightning stroke appears to become 
locked into a ball shaped structure which may be of any size from a 
couple of inches to a foot in diameter. It looks like a perfect 
sphere, brightly incandescent and floats like a bubble, being easily 
carried by air currents. They may last for a short tine, from a 
fraction of a' second to many seconds. In this interval, during 
which thoy stay fairly close to the ground, tney may cone close to 
many objects without damaging them or being damaged by them. Sud- 
denly, for no known reason, the ball explodes doing as much damage 
as a bomb, if close to structures, and no damage if in the open. 

The fire ball looked to me like a gigantically enlarged 
model of the tiny electron, one of the building blocks of matter, 
which acts as if it were just a' spherical area of space iii which an 
amount of energy was crystallized to give it structure. I felt that 
if it were possible to discover how -a .'large amount ..of energy was 
.stored in this fairy bubble structure of a fire ball a new insight 
might be gained into the structure of the electron and other funda- 
mental particles of matter. Also this method of storing energy 
could bo applied to a thousand useful purposes. 

Y/hen I approached Tesla with pleas along this line to de- 
velop this possible phase of his discovery he would evade direct ro- 
ply by indulging in a, hot always, tolerant lecture on my gull ability 
in believing theories about the complex structure of the atom. VThilc 
he had in earlier years discussed some of his experiences v/ith fire 
balls in his laboratory at. Colorado Springs and explained nis theory 
of their formation, he would not in the later years permit himself 
to be drawn into a discussion of them a3 a possible part of his sys- 
tem. This, of course, made me suspicious that the Clue v;as "hot" but 
I could bo completely wrong in my conclusions. Tesla was very quick 
in detecting my technique when I sought to narrow down a field by 
trying to get him to deny statements when, he was adamant to direct 
questions. 

« * .-.•*• . 

Tesla became familiar ‘with the destructive characteristics 
of fire balls in his experiments at . Colorado Springs in 1899. Bo 
produced then quite by accident and saw them, . more than once, explode 
and shatter his tall mast and also destroy apparatus v/ithin his 
laboratory. The destructive action accompanying the disintegration 
of a fire ball, he declared, takes place with inconceivahol violence. 

He studied the process by which- they were produced, not 
because he wanted to product them but in oraer to eliminate the con- 
ditions in which they were created. It is not pleasant, he related, 
to have a fire ball explcdo in 'jo\xr vicinity for they will destroy 
anything they come in contact 7/ith. 

It will bo necessary to reconstruct his statements from 
very fragmentary notes and a long distunce memory,. 



"Parasite 03cillati s, or circuits, within th r.ain cir- 
cuit v/oro a -source n uangcr from this, cause, Points of resistance 
in the main circuit could result in minor 03 . .lating circuits be- 
tween terminals or between two points ••.•of resistance and these minor 
circuits would havo a very much higher period of oscillation than 
the main circuit and could be set into oscillation by the main cur- 
rent of lower frequency. 

"Even when the principal oscillating circuit was adjusted 
for the greatest efficiency of operation by the dimination of all 
sources of losses the fire balls continued -:o occur but these were 
due to stray high frequency charges from random earth currents. 

"From .these experiences it became apparent that the fire 
balls resulted from the interaction of two frequencies, a stray 
higher frequency wave imposed on the lower frequency free oscilla- 
tion of the main circuit. • 

"As the free oscillation of the circuit builds up from 
the zoro point to the quarter wave length node it passes through 
various rates of change. •. In a current of shorter wavelength the 
rates of change will be steeper. ' Yttien the tv/o currents react on 
each other the resultant complex will contain a wave in which there 
is an extremely steep rate of change, and for the briefest instant 
currents may move at a tremendous rate, at the rate of millions of 
horsepower. 

"This condition acts as a trigger v/hlch may cause’ the total 
energy of the powerful longer wave to be discharged in an inf initos- 
mally small interval of timo and at a proportionately tre-mendously 
great rate of energy movement which cannot confine itself to. the 
metal circuit and is released into surrounding space with incon- 
ceivable violence." 

It is but a step, from learning how a high frequency cur- 
rent can explosively discharge a lower frequency current, to using 
the principle to design a system in which these explosions can be 
produced by intent. The following process appears a possible one 
but no eviaonce is available that it is the ono Tesla evolved: 

An oscillator, such as he used to send power wirelessly around the 
earth at Colorado Springs, is eet in operation at a frequency to which 
a given warship is resonant. The' complex structure of a ship would 
prov3.de a great number of spots in which electrical oscillations will 
be set up of a much higher frequency than those coursing through the 
ship as a whole. Tnese paraslsteicurrents will react on the main 
current causing the production of fireballs wnich by their explosions 
will destroy the ship, even more effectively than the explosion of tho 
magazine which would also take place. A second oscillator may be -.used 
to transmit the shorter wavelength current. 

Somewhat later I learned the reeson for Tesla’s reticence 
to discuss details. This came shortly after Stanley Baldwin re- 
placed Neville Chamberlin as Prime Minister of Great Britain. 

Tesla revealed that ho had carried on negotiations v/ith 
Primo Minister Chamberlin for tho sale of his ray system to Great 
Britain for $30,000,000 on tho basis of his presentation that the 
device would provide complete protection for tho British Isl03 
against any enemy approaching by sea or air, and would provide an 



cl. tensive coupon to * '\ic.h viicro was no citu osoc < Ho v/ a 3 convinced, ■ , 
ho deeX-red, of t; .. .nccrity of hr. Chamber'’ ' 1 . and hi3 intent to 
adopt - tho devico a it. would have prevented ~ outbreak of the 
then threatening v:l , and v.'ould have made pos. .ole the continuation- 
undor tho duress v/hich this weapon would make possible - of the 
'working agreement involving France, Germany end Britain to maintain 
the status quo in Europe. VVhon Chamberlin failed, at the Munich 
conference, to retain thi3 state of European equilibrium it was 
necessary to get rid of Chamberlin and install a new Prime Minister 
who coulc make tho effort to shift one corner of the triangle from 
Germany to Russia. Baldwin found no vlrt’ o in Tesla's plan and 
proemptorially ended the negotiations. 

Tesla was greatly disappointed by the collapse of his ne- 
gotiations with the British Government. With it there collapsed hi3 
hopes of providing a demonstration of his most recent, and, what he 
considered, his most important discoveries. Ko did not, however, 
dwoll on the jubject; beyond the single conversation ho did not men- 
tion the matter again. Be did not get another chance to financo the 
demonstration of these discoveries. 

During the period in v/hich the negotiations were being 
carried on, Tesla declared, efforts had been made to Steal the in- 
vention. His room had been entered and his papers examined but the 
thioves, or spies, left empty handed. There was no danger, he said, 
that his invention could -be stolen for he had at no .time committed 
any part of it to paper. He could trust his memory to preserve every 
fine detail of his investigations. This 'was true, he said, of all 
of his later major discoveries. 

The nature of his system r/ : kes little difference now; he 
has gone and. has taken it y/ith. him. Perhaps, if there is any com- 
munication from beyond the veil that separates this life from what- 
ever exists hereafter, Tesla may look down upon earth's struggling 
mortals and find some way of dropping a hint concerning what he 
accomplished; but, if the situation is such that this cannot take 
place, then we must await until tho human race produces another 
.Tesla* 


0O0 


\ 


\ 


I. r;F0P.t.1?.T*0vl COMTMNED. 3 

- '•!: 13 UliCLASSlHED, 


; M 




Thank you for your letter of April 20th, with 
enclosures. It was certainly most thoughtful of you to 
furnish us this information, and your interest and 


courtesy are indeed appreciated. 


MAILED 6 


APR 3 01976 


FBI 


Sincerely yours, 

C. M. Kelley 

Clarence M. Kelley 
Director 


b~lC 



NOTE: Bufiles indicate limited correspondence with 

last outgoing 6-27-73, in reply to his request concerning 
papers of -Dr. Nikola Tesla* Dr. Tesla was a world-famous 
electrical inventor, and at the time of his death in 1943, 
all of his personal papers and effects were believed dangerous 
to the country's security if they fell into unauthorized hands. 

Di, yjjg book "Prodigal Genius," by John J. O'Neill, alleged that 

o«p . ao in.. _the FBI took over a certain safe and opened it, appropriating his 
a..., Di,. : property. Bufiles indicated the Office of Alien Property of 

Admin. th e D e p ar tm ei vt of Justice did so. Bufile 100-2237-23. 

Comp. Sy *». * 




J 




r 





j ; JM 1 8 


OlCuilefc J&iaUz Senate 


To ensure proper handling P^ase return a . ! 


Pat 

Respectfully referred to: 


*.v;; 


Assoc, uir. 

Dep. AD A dm. __ 

Dep. AD Inv. 

Asst. Dir.; 

Adm. Serv. % X_) ' 
Ext. Affairs ( 


F in. & Pers. 

Gen. Inv. 

Ident. 

Inspection 

fntefl. __ 


I Laboratory 

Legal Coun. 

Flan. & Eval. 

Fee. Mgnt. _ 

Spec. Inv. 

Training ________ 

Telephone Rm. 

Director Sec’y 

^01/ DOJ 



FBI 


Please respond to the 
ciupl icate ant' return 
you for yoj r coopers: 


attached inqui 
the enclosure, 
ion. 


ry i n 
Thank 


u.s.s. 






/ • 


f JUN'i 7 1976 
CO 



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/ 0 0 -c3o 3 3 7-30 June ”■ 1976 



Honorable Hi lllam* Proaoalre 
United States Senate 
Washington, D. C. 20510 

Dear Senator Proaqalre : 



This will respond 
enclosing the letter of Mr 
Kjgconsljg^ S3- 2- £ 5* j 



ion of June 15th 
Milwaukee, 


The effects of Dr. Mikola Tesla were impounded, after 
his death, by the Office of Alien Property of the Department 
of Justice and not by the TBI. Since we did not participate 
in the handling of Dr. Tesla's belongings, I as enable to 
furnish the information you desire. 


A copy of your ccssmmi cation and of this reply are 
being referred to the Department of Justice and the enclosure 
to your ccripiuni cation is being returned as requested. 



Sincerely yours, 

C. M. Kelley 

Clarence M. Kelley 
Director 


Enclosure 

1 - Assistant Attorney General - Enclosures (2) 
Civil Division 

1 - Milwaukee - Enclosures (2) 


1 - Office of Congressional Affairs - Enclosures (2) 

NOTE: This response is consistent with past responses to 

inquiries of a similar nature . Bufile 100-2237 reflects 
that the Office of Alien Property took possession of 
Dr. Tesla's papers following his death. 


DJC 

Attoc. Oh 

Dep. AO Adm 

Dep. AD Inv. 

Asst. Dir.: 

Adm. Serv. 

Em. A Ho ir* 

Fin. A Pen. 

Gen. Inv. 

Ident. 


mmd/^njb (T) 
/h-\ l~ 


MAILIQJQ ..... 

*j JUN 2 3 1976 i 

ta vr 


Inspection 

Intel!. — 

Loborotory 

Legal Coun. 

Plon. & E vol. ___ 

Rec. Mgnt 

Spec. Inv. 

Training 

Telephone Rm. 

Director Sec'y 



bTC 





FBI / DO J 





££ /? 7 ? 




1 

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a»TL 






ti: * ’ ALL INFD5MATI.CH CCIITAIL'SD^ 

^a^s’ ;, ' v i'i io UNCLASSIFIED v '-‘T-^v 
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79 4^ r 4 


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a^^^XX/cX 


1 


-SCO&U 




August 6 , 1979 



ffiSSHEE SOURCE 








J^ou r recent letter requesting information concerning 


Dr. Nikolafr'Tasla. has been received. 


-t*f 

i f 

& 

m 


The effects of Dr. Tesla were impounded , after his 
death , by the Office of Alien Property of the Department of 
Justice and not by the FBI. We have no preprinted material, 
available for public distribution regarding Dr. Tesla. Hov- 
ever, under the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act 
(Title 5, United States Code, Section 552), requests have been 
made in the past regarding your topic and there may be docu- 
ments available to you under Title 28 — Code of Federal 
Regulations. 

If you are interested in seeking such documents 
under the Freedom of Information Act, you should make a 
separate inquiry, clearly marking the envelope and letter as a 
Freedom of Information Act request, and direct it to the 
Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, 9th Street and 
Pennsylvania Avenue, H.W., Washington, D. C. 20535. In the 
letter you roust request documents regarding the specific topic 
interest to you. 79 

G-tfl 



CO 

CD 


Sincerely yours 




».J3 

UE23 


M?- 2 23 7- 


William L. Bailey 
Assistant Director 



2 AUG 7 1979 


Assoc. Dir. 

Dep. AD Adw. 

Dep. AD Inv. _ 

Asst. Dir.: 

Adm. Servs. 

Cfiw. Inv. 

I dent 

i-i.il. — NOTE : 


Mr Underwood - Enclosure 
Room 6958 •_ - 

(This correspondence response biay engender a future FOIA in- 
quiry.) 


p r 


Based 
identifiable 


upon available .information, 'correspondent is not 
in Bufiles >■" * ■ • • ' * “ 


Legal Coen. . 

Plan. & Insp. 

Tech. Servs. . 
Training . 

Public AHs. Oil. 


( 4 ) 


J 




k J . 


i:. J 


UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 


..^UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
FEDERAL HUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


TO 

FROM 

SUBJECT 

A 


Mr. Bresson 


date: 2/25/80 



bid 


Dtp. AD Adm 

0*p. AO In*. 

Aul Dir.: 

Adm. 

Crin. Inv. 

Went. _ 

l.l.il 

Loboratory 

L*fol Cm*. .... 

Ploo & titip. 

Rtc. Mgnt. 

T*ci. Stin. . 

Train inf 

Public AM*. OM 

Telephone R«. 

Director’* Joc’y 



FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT DISCLOSURE 
REGARDING DR. NIKOLA -TESLA 


PURPOSE: 


■' ' vxwfli ifeva, / , 


To reduce time spent on handling of requests for 
information on captioned subject and to promote uniformity 
of disclosure. 

DETAILS : 

A search of FBIHQ central records indices reflects 
that Dr. Nikola Tesla is carried as the subject of Bufile 
100-2237. Virtually all information in this file is inquiry- 
type correspondence. For purposes of FOIA releases, copies 
of this material have not been made and requesters have been ■ 

so advised. Copies of the remaining material in the file , 

totalling 29 pages, however, has been processed for disclosure. ! 
Numerous requesters have sought information relating to N 

Dr. Tesla under the FOIA. Therefore, it is recommended that \ 
the disclosure documents maintained in Bufile 190-16504-4 be __ _ 
considered the preprocessed release appropriate for responses , 
by the Initial Processing Unit for any further requests for 
information on this subject. 

RECOMMENDATION : X 

That the Initial Processing Unit, FOIPA Branch, 

Records Management "Division, add captioned case to their 
list of preprocessed cases and Randle any future requests 
for such information, y //—«£, ^^7 — 

' ■ . t.-UO 

ood 


N 


1 - Mr . 

1 - Miss' 

100-223’/' - 

~ ~ a 190‘.-ei'6?04jSU 
Us * ' • • . • • 


eahrvas (7) 
Y • ' 



IcftC 

\' r 3QX 

MAR 27 1980 



Buy U.S. Savings Bonds Regularly on the Payroll Savings Plan 









RESEARCH AND 
ENGINEERING 



WASHINGTON. D C. 20301 


FEDERAL GOVKKWtOTf 9 FEB 1S81 



MEMORANDUM FOR THE DIRECTOR, FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
SUBJECT: Papers Recovered on the Death of Nicola Tesla (U) 


(U) We understand that the FBI may have possession of-a number of papers 
found after the death of Nicola Tesla in 1943. NicolarTesla was a brilliant 
electrical engineer (i.e. the Tesla Coil) who was a pioneer in various 
aspects of electrical transmission phenomena. 


(C) We believe that certain of Tesla's papers may contain basic principles 
which would be of considerable value to certain ongoing research within the 
DoD. It would be very helpful to have access to his papers. 


(U) Since we have really no idea of the possible volume of these papers, 
we would be happy to provide a researcher who could assist you in reducing 

the magnitude of the search. If there are further questions, I am the \ 

point of contact within the DoD and can be reached at 695-6364 or 695-7417. > 


wire 

1 05963.8 

^ - - 



tjl 

OJrth £*JdoSures 



Allan J. MacLaren 
LtColonel , USAF 
Military Assistant 
Strategic and Space Systems 


fao. 







Classifed by: DUSDRE/S&SS 

Declassify on: February 1987 



bjc 


/ « - '< 


i 0 ^m, 




' 9 -Ti ^,/f^ 




l ' r ' P]' 


Is' 


,n 


CCu; : 



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10 


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strategic ar.J Space Systes>s 
Office of the Under Secretary 
of Defense 

hashing tor. , D. C. 20301 
Dear Colonel *'ac L iren : 


ipisui Govrara®" 

r.L r:- -ion contained 


Your rcc.oranovjr of Feb n-ary 9 requesting access to 
the scientific papers of Dr. Mikola ^Teela which night be in 
oar files has been referred to office for reply. 


A prelir irary review of cur files indicates that the 
r_: dir not participate in the handling of Dr. Tesla’s belong - 
ir.es fellow!::-;: his death in ‘lav; York City in January, 1943. 
bis payers were exat'ino-J by representatives of the Office 




I 


Case AO lev* 

Cksc AO A4n. 

Case AO LES 

Ant. Oir.: 

Ada. Serv* 

Crisi. Isv. 

Idoot. 

Intel! . 

Laboratory 

Logoi Cowa. 

Plon. & Imp. 

Roc. Mgnl. 

Tocb. Sorv«. 

Troiftiag 

Pvblic All*. OH _ 

Telopkenr Ra. 

Director's Soc'y __ 


cc. vie tc oti'.rcii '"'f err i^jicas is being ic to 
dttorr.-ir.e if we nave ar.y in formation that rdght be useful 
to you. You will L>e notified cf ths results of this search 

DE -110 / ' -v -v -> — 7 , 


at the earliest possible date. 


2J 


32 j 7<^l\ 

Sincerely , . 

E KAR 12 798| 




Roger r. Young ‘ - 

Assistant Director in Charge 
Office of Congressional 
and Public Affairs 


L1C 

Vfi'i Vi 

TOZiL, R. ?, iD/ who has handled sii 


lar recruc-sts for, irlforr*atio?^Tnpu^rxIefl concerning. Dr. Tasla. In nu- 


(PCIPA) - Enc. 


Kf« c . 

s<jc with^ 



MAIL ROOM 


li*£2\x 20, 13 2 i 




Lt . Col. A. .J .^Iaciaron 
_■ -•! 1 i. t a r v f.api a £&nt 
L t rit^jic aatf^ icg g y ^tc -.s 
u: i ice of the cnie r Secretary 
of Dcfc - nsa 

Ka*nin~tcm, u. C. 2030 1 
Dear Colonel Kaclxiren : 


Federal 


government 


ALL INTONATION CONTAINED \ 
KiZREIi; IS UNCLASSIFIED V 

DAIZiVv-X -Vi 


A ccpujilctc y&ciiroh of oar retrievable files concern - 
in 3 Dr. t : ikolfc^cg IV] shows that all notes ar.d aatarial in hi a 
ii to i'OjaCiSio:: At the Live of hi; death cn January 7, 1 

were plact-d in Lbo custody of the /Mi or. Property Custodian 
under seal by the Jr.itc-d .Mates Jovarnaant. These a.aterirl.3 
have never been in the care or custody of the FCI‘. 




Laboratory 

Legal Cmd. . 
Plan. & Insp. 

Ree. Mgnt. 

Tech. Strvi. 
Training . 


Pwblic Affs. OH. 

Telephone Rn. 

Director’s Sec'y . 


xt: ’ 27, 10S2, re 'oral authorities eu'e 
f the effiv-ti? of Dr. 7c:: la to Jctcrsiir** if 
an. ideas of uiyniriuer.t value fct t.V Ur.ito.; Stater war oliort 
coals ba founs. His effect a wore cxarsinci at the Manhattan 
hare.i&use and Storage- Co.: p«::y at 52nd ar.I 7th Avenue, Dev' York., 
how York, where they a -no rent!/ were taker; after hie cent!'.. rar- 
tic.iixii.iny in this examination verc representatives fro:-: the 
DW York an-.! fashing ten Office;, of the Alien Property Cue too lie, the 
Office of Scientific he search and Development at the Massa- 
chusetts Institute- of Technology, the Office of Laval Intel- 
ligence, and United States Navel l:e;;oarch. Che TCI did not 
participate in this examination. (65-47953 section 1) 

It wee the considered opinion of a spohetnan of those 
examiners *’thct there exist. a-cr.y Dr. Tesla's papers and posses- 
sions no scientific notes, descriptions of hitherto unrevealed 
methods or devices , or actual apparatus which could be o r 
significant value to this country or which would constitute a 
hazard in unfriendly hands." There was thought to be no 
technical or riilitary reason why further custody of the property 
should fce> retained. However, our files indicate that certain 
papers, which were regarded as typical of Nikola Tesla's writings 


an.*, thou-rntc 


K V V V. *. W J, T-4, V V* W -« M a v ^ A W . It »,!• 4 V/ W AVI V/ WA A 5 

ir. the period of 1925 ^L54 2 , core- Ts!e;';cvc ’ fur // /' 


the r.^tn:y t fcu|cf to t;u. 

(65-47953 section 1) 


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anc trunks under seui by the buv York 3 e; -nr tar-ant of Taxation. 

The rental for this storage, approx imatcly $15 pfcr aonth, ... . 

was being paid by Charlotte Kuxar, 134 Cast €3rd Street; 

l.’cv Tor!;, new York, who was listed as an agent for Sava Xosanovish , 

Dr. Tesla's nephe-r and administrator of his estate. ( 65 - 47953 - 14 ) 


On October 26 , 1945, Pr-1 veter "M oyer . - 'P ’-ltsggrad.d , U . -S . #wt> , 
A*iay, a younr scientist who had been Tesla's protege, called 
in person at our Few York Field Office. With hiua were ' 

J : 4 v-v>~3avi-d- br^rattrT-XtfT^TlQzrbort-O.^-XJchat t an:l ttvrR^ r £.> _ 
ioole froa a research development unit at Wright Field, Dayton, , 
Ohio. These non carried a letter signed by Brigadier General 
Xrt—C r • -Ora i j e a , * Chie T 5ng i nesting Division- *?ri n h t f ield , requos t- 
ing that the FBI alloy the bearers of the latter access to the ’ 
off nets of Nikola Tesla. (65-47953-15) /' b,'k . 7 

It was explained to thi-s-si Li-tary- contingar. t that the 
FEJ had no jurisdiction over Tesla's effects, and they ware 
referred to the Office of the Alien Property Custodian. Bureau 
files do not indicate whether tho men ever examined Tesla's 
b-lor: jin jo. (65-47953-15) 


Tic Tonic effects reu.iair.ed In rob . at 5J and 52, of the 
ruinhAttan storage Company. In the 1959s, FBI Agents were told by 
company management that the only recorded visit had been cade 
by "Federal author! ties" in January, 1943. Tho -floor flu per. 

.yiror recalled that the acn had taken nuaorous photographs. 

His description of the equipnont used would tend to show that : 
a microfilm reproduction vas made of the papers of the deceased. 

(65-47953-27) ' ' ' - ; '* 

Our filer do not reflect any pertinent information 

on the Tesla materials since that date. Their current whereabouts 
or condition are not reflected in our files. 

For further information regarding this matter, you nay ' , 
wish to contact the Office of the Alien Property Custodian amd u : v - 
tho other Federal agencies mentioned above. i- vA- - - ; u 



Assistant Director in Charge 
Office of Congressional 
and Public Affairs 


(coirriMTTP - ovnro 


2 



I 


(VOTE* February 0, 1931, dVt . (ixUr-.n vff^u to -u^ inquiring 

sbt>u.t7 the scientific: papers of Or. ftt(fc©ta Testa- 3 return) 
letter of iiarch 3, we informed hia that, a thorough review of 
our filec would be wade in search of the information he requestac. 
Thin van done and he is being informed of the results. Tesla' e 
papers have been the' subject of numerous inquiries by various 
individuals and organizations since his death. Ft I received 
over 20 FOXA requests on this isatter during the period 1973- 
1950. Matter coordinated with FOIA Section, Rib. 


! 








■ H IT 1 TT1 



C ICE OF THE UNDER SECRETARY OF L ENSE 



WASHINGTON. O C 20301 




RESEARCH ANO 
ENGINEERING 


’ 1 APR 1981 


f' 


FEDERAL <HT/™KMENT 


Mr. Roger S. Young 

Assistant Director in Charge 

Office of Congressional and Public Affairs 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Washington, D.C. 20535 

Dear Mr. Young, 


// 



Thank you very much for your letters of March 10 and March 20, 1981/* in 

o 

response to our request re Dr. We very much appreciate the effort 

A //• •//• 

that must have gone Into this/” 


On behalf of the Deputy Under Secretary 
(Strategic and Space Systems), Dr. S. L. Zeiberg, I would like to thank 
you and the people who spent their time searching out the relevant data. 

Sincerely, 

, - * Tf\>t c%'7aVS.Z'D \ 

- •• w ij cc*VT£.j 



'V<’rT>oI>Mb!is diiuL 3/39/93 

With 

ALL DoXf t 
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FBI 

AUANFORMATION contained 
HEREIN IS UNCLASSIFIED 

pate V-?- fa ,_sr: 

WA Me. ttL icS 

3 L 2 ,o°l 



pub • • 



o'TC. 


21 July 1981 



Director of the FBI 
Washington, D.C. 

Dear Sir: 




►J f- ci 


p* r 



D ■ 


-.- A -Vk 




While attending college, I came across, an article about the 

r 1 1 j i w •? 

v, _/ / • t ( • • 

electrical genius, Nicolai Tesla ."~~Mf. Tesla was an electrical 
genius with such peers as EDISON and WESTINGHOUSE . Tesla 

OUTSIDE 

designed the basic generator and was the first man to introduce 
alternating current to the people. The article, written in an 
underground SanFrancisco newspaper, stated that Tesla also 
worked with electromagnetic waves and supposedly built a plant 
that could harness the electromagnetic waves out of the earth's 
atmosphere sufficiently enough to use them as a source of elec- 
tricity. The article stated that Tesla built such a plant and 
lit up a city street 150 miles away by sending the electromag- 
netism via radio waves. This method is presently being used in 
electronic warfare. After that, the article stated that the- 
FBI confiscated his plans and buried them in your archives. 

Their reasoning was that such a free form of energy would knock 
out a big chunk of the oil, coal, and nuclear forms of energy 
and their contributions to the economy (money for research and 
employment) . All I want to know is if there is any truth to 
this story and if so what was the FBI's reasons and when are the 
archives opened again so that Tesla's work could come to light 
again. Now bear in mind that this man was anyalectrical genius 
and even had a unit of electrical measure named after hinn' ^lf 


Y 



he did 
waves 


id figure out k way to utilize the earth's electromagnetic 

•• l l \ AUG i.i ? 98 .i 

s then I believe that we are ready to gradually phase out 


our dependence on oil, ease the volatile tension in the Middle > ^ 

y? 

East and put all that money presently going to the Arabs into ’ 

cf ' 


.o' 


■■ " ■ n r 1 


space research, joint international research and deep-sea 
research to help solve our population problem. I am talking 
about huge sums of money being released that could speed up 
the experts present projected times of pro'ducing significant 
gains in these still relatively new fields. 

You could at least take the time to check out what I am 
saying and judge for yourself whether or not the archives 
should be opened now to put the world back on a more secure 
heading. 



‘ FPO SanFrancisco 96602 


AUG 1 « MW 


August 7, 1981 


ALL INrcr; 
HEREIN IS 
DATE *\-\A 


^LAoSI rlED 

•N Tj V^fV. 


C^mSE SOURCS 



A *L/ /A a; ^(5/^ Rg l>ACTt ct; 


Judge Webster has referred year letter of July 21st 
to me for a reply. A check of our files indicates Dr. Nikola 
Tesla's effects were impounded after his death by the Office 
of Alien Property of the Department of Justice and not by 
the FBI. While your interest is indeed appreciated , the FBI 
is unable to answer your questions as we did not participate 
in the handling or have anything to do with the storage of 
Dr . Tes la ' 8 be longings . 

To be as helpful as possible, I am forwarding a 
copy of this oossmani cation to the Department of Justice. 



Sincerely, 




Roger S. Young -r 

Assistant Director ip Charge 

Office of Congressional 
and Public Affairs 

- Actin^-J^sistarst^Btforney i-General‘5« ! 3*llclosure ~ 

Civil Division • *n r\ y d 

5** <• •> 


NOTE: 

! died o 


wf rm&M 


is not identif iable in Bufiles. Dr. ^Te^a 

and we have received iftjipb correspondence I 


and we have regexyea [ftjiph correspondence / I' 10' 

regarding his belongings which.'.were "impounded by the Office /A» [S i 

of Alien Property of the Department of Justice. , 

' '.(■«) i 15 0rl ' L. ,i / - 3.6 

^ • ' 17 ; 


MAIL ROOM Ej * / 


I 



FD-36 (Rev. 8-26-82) 


TRANSMIT VIA: 
□ Teletype 

s gag 


PRECEDENCE: 

□ Immediate 

□ Priority 

□ Routine 


CLASSIFICATION: 

□ TOP SECRET 

□ SECRET 

□ confidential 

□ UNCLASEFTO 

□ UNCLAS 

Date 8/18/8 




DIRECTOR, FBI 

ATTN: INTD, SUPERVISOR 















isiC 


r sj b l 


SE«T 


blC. 


involvement in the seizing of Nikola Tesla's research papers 
and other documents and scientific instruments after his death 
on January 7, 1943. t 

i 'cscxh . 

They bothpexplafned that Tesla was a scientific 
genius and experimenter who w as born in Yu goslavia of Serbian 
parents o n 7/10/56; went to school later in Gratz, Aus tria, 

Prague, CzechosLoYakia., and Paris, Franc e . He immigrated to 
the U.S. in the" early 1880's, worked for Thomas Edison's laboratory 
for a couple of years, then started his own lab after being paid 
$1 million dollars for rights to his patents on his polyphase 
systems of alternating current dynamos, which le£d to the t - ' /] 

harnessing of Niagra Falls for producing electricity /V 

and then the power system of the whole country. He was naturalized 
in 1889. He predicted wireless communication (radio). His later 
experiments in Colorado and elsewhere le^dto his producing 
artificial lightning in the millions of volts. He also had 

? atents on the concept of neon and flourescent lights, but he 
ater made little money on his later inventions, although he 
continued to do experiments leading to devices of great 
potential worth, which he never patented. He became more 
reclusive in his later years, living in various hotels in New York 
City. In the 1930‘s he claimed he had developed the concept and 
method of building a "death ray", which could destroy planes at 
many miles distant, for defending America. Also, there are reports 
of resonance machines or devices whereby he could shake one or 
many large city buildings from some distance away. 

BothVHHfand^^^l^fsaid that Tesla donated "some" 
of his papers (or copies thereof) to the Tesla Institute in 
Belgrade, Yugoslavia; set up in the 1930's in his honor by their 
government. Biographies on Tesla claim that either the custodian 
of Alien Property and/or the FBI seized his papers and other 
personal effects, including a safe or safes, and other property 
immediately after his death in 1943. This is elaborated on in 
the enclosed copies of certain pages of Margaret Cheney’s book, 
"Tesla: Man Out of Time". 

/* 


shipped £ 
nephew , Sav 

TJTs 


said that after World War II Tesla's papers were 
P^fcsla Institute in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, by his 
jjtegyic, who had become Tito i * i r^§astaaof to the 


There y were reports that some microfilming of Tesla's 
papers by government agents while they were still in storage 
in New York under Kosanovic's custody. 


//• 


v 

SECKT 

7 ? 


- 2 - 


I 


bid 

bIC. 



Also, the Soviet Union has allegedly had access 
to some of Tesla's papers, possibly in Belgrade and/or 
else where, which influenced their early research into directed 
energy weapons, and Butler feels access to much of Tesla's 
papers on lightning, beam weapons and/or "death rays" would 
give him more Insight into the Soviet beam weapons program. 

This is Butler's area of expertise and responsibility. He 
has been unable to locate any Tesla papers or copies of same 
in the classified or unclassified libraries at WPAFBJ However, 
there are reports that some portions of them were shipped by 
the Custodian of Alien Property Office in Washington, D.C. to 
a technical research lab at WPAFB, possibly the "Equipment 
Lab", now closed for some years or reorganized into another 
organization. 


VHHH(.are both desirous of learning 
the locations ot such papersotTesla as now exist in the U.S., 
for both intelligence and research purposes. Therefore, Butler 
would like to examine FBI files relating to Nikola Tesla and 
possibly any on Sava Kosanovic, his nephew who received the 
bulk of his papers after Tesla's death, and may possibly 
have been the subject of FBI investigation. 


■■■[travels to the Washington, D.C. area on 
FTD busines^periodically and can review FBI files at FBIHQ 
relating to Tesla and Kosanovic. 


REQUEST OF THE BUREAU 


The Bureau is requested to conduct full indices checks 
on both Nikola Tesla and Sava Kosanovic. 




New Y< 
above 
intere 1 


Should there be such files at FBIHQ, 
tested that Bureau consider 
>f FTD, official access to 
security. 


£>nouxa mere 


as well as at 
granting the 
same , in the 


LEADS 


NEW YORK * 

AT NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

Will conduct same indices check as requested of 
Bureau and advise the Bureau and Cincinnati of results and 
confirm such files and references still exist there. AM 

-3- secBt 



SECRET 


CINCINNATI 

AT DAYTON. OHIO 

11 maintain contact wit 


- 4 *- 




I 








W&F? yMVtfak ^=S| 
Wfr~y : ' ■ r<-38| 

mrs<r-' "•■^•ia 





An artist's rendering of Tesla's concept of the war of the future. 
The towerlike structures (based on the intended final form of 
the Wardendyffe tower) are directing remote-controlled 
defenses against robot attackers. As Hugo Gernsback wrote in 
Science and Invention , where this illustration appeared, 
‘‘Machines only will meet in mortal combat. It will be a 
veritable war of Science." (Gernsback Publications, Inc.) j 




d 

A- 


'% i 

\ *■ i 

.. . •; 

’) '/- • ■ 


r ' 






f. AvyyMih'- V 






The ill-fated Wardendyffe tower built in 1901-03. It was 
intended for radio broadcasting and wireless transmission of 
power across the Atlantic. (Courtesy L. Anderson, after photo 
by Lillian McChesney) 




■ ■ '••• ,v. 




A 


; f ' 


;r i 


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fr. > 


..\v\ 


'•*&A 


A trio of scientific greats: Albert Einstein, Nikola Tesla, and 
Charles Steinmetz, as they appeared in 1921 in a visit to the 
RCA transoceanic station at New Brunswick, NJ. At the time, 
Tesla was deeply involved in his patent dispute with Marconi. 
Only after his death would the U.S. Supreme Court uphold 
Tesla's claim to be the true father of radio. (RCA) 




tl' i 






Tesla in his laboratory, 
1898. The device shown 
is an unconnected coil 
illustrating the action of 
two resonating circuits of 
different frequencies — 
today one of the basic 
circuits used in computers. 
The pressure at the end 
of the coil facing the 
viewer (illuminated by 
streamers) is 
approximately one half 
million volts. (Courtesy 
L. Anderson) 






' J: V 
■e **•>*"• 


i.v- 


r.; . ■ , „• 


cwYonk, 


The letterhead of Testa business stationery recalls some of his 
more important inventions. In the center is the Wardenclyffe 
tower as it was intended to look when finished. (Courtesy 
L. Anderson) 








Discharge of several million volts cascading around Tesla in his 
Colorado Springs laboratory. The roar that accompanied such 
discharges could be heard ten miles away. (Burndy Library) 


HURLER OF LIGHTNING <-» X37 

of low frequency and would yield sinusoidal and continuous osdlla 
tons like those of an alternator 

"Taken In the narrowest significance of the term, however,” 
Tesla wrote, Ttba resonant transformer which, besides possessing 
these qualities, is accurately proportioned to fit the globe and its 
electrical constants and properties, by virtue of which design tt 
becomes highly efficient and effective In the wireless transmission of 
energy Distance is then absolutely eliminated, there being no diminu- 
tion tn the intensify of the transmitted impulses. It is even possible to 
make the actions incneose with the distance from the plant according 
to an exact mathematical law"* 

Once this powerful equipment was built and the Inventor 
began testing he was able to emulate the electrical fireworks of even 
the wildest mountain storms. When the transmitter was operating, 
Bghtning arresters in a twelve-mile radius from his station were bridged 
with continuous fiery arcs, stronger and more persistent than those 
produced by natural lightning. ^ 

For the first time he kept a careful daily diary in which he 
recorded every aspect of his research. And because visual effects were 
useful as well as thrilling, He devoted many hours to photographic 
experiments. 

The equipment Tesla tons perfecting would, he hoped, one 
day be adaptable for commercial use But first, thousands of observa- 
tions and delicate adjustments had to be made. He no longer trusted 
his legendary memory to store such a volume of information. His daily 
notes referred constantly to experiments that had failed to turn out as 
expected, and he would ask himself why This process was at sharp 
variance vtfth the one he claimed to have used throughout his earlier 
life Now middle-aged, he may have felt his memory waning slightly 
Certainly he felt driven by the pressures of his self-imposed deadline 
in his Colorado journal to lifelong fascination with visual 
phenomena b underscored The flashing fights that he had always 
experienced on the screen of to mind were dramatically externalized, 
and hb descriptions, among the mass of mathematical formulas, are 
detailed, loving, almost erotic in their fingering portrayal of the colors 
and grandeur of to Colorado electrical storms. 4 

Nights when experiments were being made with the magnify- 
ing transmitter the prairie sky exploded with sound and coloc Even the 
earth seemed alive and the crash of thunder from the spark gap could 
be heard for miles Butterflies were sucked into the vortex of the 











ii : -[%i 




*: ■■■•? .u; ■ 




Death and Transfiguration 


The new government of King Peter, with brood popular support, 
confronted the Germans and refused to ratify the compromise agree* 
ment that had been made with Hitler by Prince Raul Almost at once 
reprisals began. 

On Palm Sunday 1941, three hundred Luftwaffe bombers 
swept over the Yugoslav capital of Belgrade. Methodically they 
crisscrossed the dty street by street, strafing everything that breathed 
By noon 25,000 civilians were dead, and the wounded lay every- 
where. Most public buildings were left in ruins, including the modem 
laboratory known as the Tesla Institute. 

The combined armed forces of Germany Italy Hungary and 
Bulgaria invaded the doomed country Within only days the Yugoslav 
Army was crushed, and King Refer was sent to England for safety Hb 
govemment-ln-exite would operate from London for the remainder of 
World War IL 

This, however, was xmly the beginning of the war for 
Yugoslavs. Accustomed to successive invasions for a thousand yean, 
the people were resilient The remnants of the Army and Communist 
factions withdrew into the mountains, from which they launched 
guerrilla attacks on the invaders. These armed fighters, men and 
women, were supplied with food grown by the old people and chfldren 
remaining in undefended villages. 

Against them the Nazis and Fascists carried out murderous 
reprisals. In the fishing villages and along the stony slopes of the 
Adriatic, half the people in every hamlet were systematically shot 

Soon, however; it became apparent to military strategists in the 
United States and England that, not only were Axis forces killing 
Yugoslavs, but rival guerrilla factions of monarchists and Communists 
had begun to vie for Allied support and were shooting each other as 
well as the invaders. 

CoL Orazha Mihaflovtd, a Serbian army officer, led a faction 
called Chetniks (the “Yugoslav Army in the Fatherland**), composed 
mainly of Serbian and Bosnian monarchists. With dose ties to King 





DEATH AND TRANSFIGURATION 259 


Peter, they became the first major resistance movement in Europe. 1 
The initial British aid to Yugoslavia went to the Chetniks, but it was 
ahort-fived. The National Liberation Army or Partisans, led by Jodp 
Bios Tta> of the Communist Party was swiftly rising to prominence. 

Allied strategists knew little of Tito. It was said he had been left 
wounded on a battlefield in 1917 and captured by the Russians. There 
he was trained as a Corranunbt leader and sent to France during the 
Spanish Gvfl War to aid the Loyaftsts or Republicans. 

A Croat, TUo had tittle reason to love the monarchy for he was 
imprisoned after returning to Yugoslavia. On release, he became 
active in organizing a metal worker^ union and helped to build the 
Yugoslav labor movement His emergence as head of the Partisans In 
World War Q was that of a natural leader who inspired his fighters and 
maintained rigorous cftscip&ne. He was looking ahead to a time when 
the Slavs could rebuild a frerand united country without oppression 
either by foreigners or kings. 

Tito* goal was to set up c o m mitl e es of popular Iberiatton after 
the Russian style, while MihaHcvid and the Chetniks favored local 
administrative authorities under the monarchy Both factions kept on 
killing Germans and Italians but, unfortunately they abo cpntinued 
murdering each other* 

FYol Bogdan Raditsa*, then director of the information service 
of the Yugoslav Embassy In Washington, D.G, recalls, “The situation ' 
became rather complicated when Yugoslavia coBapsed in 1941 and 
when, at the end of that year; a Royal Yugoslav Mission came to this 
country” it was composed of members of King Peter* government 
and the Ban (Governor) of Croatia, Dr. Ivan Suballd. Spa Koyanovtd. 
l^s*n^heH then a member of the Democratic Pu^SSoe^/Sd as 
erran&erlS the exiled go v ernment ^ * 

“As soon as Kosanovid came to the States,” says Pro fe ssor 
Racfitsa, “he tried to reorient Tesla horn the exclusive Serbian policy 
and he succeeded. Tesla, even before, never felt himself a Great 
Serbian chauvinist He used to say 1 am a Serb but my fatherland is 
Croatia.*” 3 

The conflict between Serbs and Croats in exile Intensified as 
the war went on, paralyzing normal Slav diplomatic activities in 
London, Washington, and New York. 

“Kosanovid, though a Serb,” recalls Raditsa, “was leading the 
struggle for a brotherhood between the Serbs and Croats against 
Fotid and many other Serb members of various Yugoslav missions. 
*Radfea belonged to a tomfly In aouthsm Croatia that had fawoivda union of 

Cfoafeitt and $«ft* 








DEATH AND TRANSFIGURATION «— > 262 


i . : I' i; 

J -3 ; •! k«|i ! 

;; / v^,f 'l^ij 

1 

2 ' *** ji ;!i'i 

1 '■ ii$l 

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The King added that be was deeply touched and that both he 
and Dt Testa had wept He then visited Columbia University to be 
wannly welcomed by President Nicholas Murray Butler and to find 
another fink with Ms own country In the Pupln Physics Laboratory 

Returning to Washington, he was assured by FDR that food, 
clothing, arms, and ammunition would be dropped over Yugoslavia. 
But he was shocked when, In 1943, the British Mission in Yugoslavia 
made official contact with Tito. Peter asked to be parachuted into his 
country but Churchill demurred Tito openly accused Mihatiovid of 
being a traitor:* 

At the Teheran Conference in November there occurred, 
largely at ChurchilTs instance, what the King described as a "fatal 
change** of Alfied policy It was decided that "the basic force fighting 
the Germans in Yugoslavia recognized by the Allies was the National 
Liberation Army under the command of Uto, and the Partisan force 
received full recognition as an Allied Army Mihallovtt was thus denied 
and abandoned" 7 

Winston Churchill overnight became a hero of modem 
Yugoslavia. And when the young monarch frantically wrote to FDR for 
‘ support, the ailing President replied urging him to accept ChurchilTs 
advice "as If it was my own." Within months Roosevelt died 

Tesl a's ngphevttJfosan^ ot her diplo matic 

tgl^^ RaffitS £ those 

dayf that he rctfTdsta had been terribly shocked by his nephew's 
exclusion from the royal government In fact Kosanovid believed that 
the Inventor's death was actually precipitated by Ns own "setback.” 

"He thought," Kosanovid repeatedly told Raditsa, "that 1 was 
punished and that eventually I would be arrested or something of the 
kind but I succeeded to convince him that it was inevitable in 
politics."* 

During this period Kosanovid was frank in saying that he tried 
to keep Tesla from seeing members of the royal government Ambas- 
sador Fotid had become "the enemy" since be still favored a Great 
Serbian policy as opposed to the changes ahead Tesla's relationship 
with this old friend became "lukewarm." 

"There Is no doubt," says Professor Raditsa, "that the whole 
internecine tragedy of Yugoslavia from 1941 to 1943 must have had a 
rather depressing impact upon Tesla. Very often he would ask me, 
could I explain to him what was going on among us, and why we 
cannot agree..." 




DEATH AND TRANSFIGURATION 263 


After the war, Mlhafiovid would be executed by a “People's 
Court" for alleged collaboration with the enemy and the Republic of 
Yugoslavia declared to exist, with THo as President for fife and the 
Communists firmly In charge. 

A count of Yugoslavian casualties at the end of World War 0 
ffisdosed that 2 million persons had died tragically many thousands 


had been killed by fellow Yugoslavs. 


" recalls Professor Raditsa, 
^^^£W0BaeQL.and I waste assistant in 
iflon from 1944 to 194KS, .when I left the country 


for I couldn't become a Communist Later on in 1946, Sava Kosanovid 


became Tito's ambassador in Washington but 1 never saw him again 
after I left Belgrade in October of 1946. Kosanovid had acospted totally 
the Communist system In Yugoslavia and remained loyal until Ns 
death." 


There had not been a time In ten cdhturies when the Yugoslavs 
had not been ruled and ransacked by invaders— by Venetians, . 
Romans, Turks, Bulgars, Austrians, Hungarians, Germans, Italians, 
when they were not living under threat of torture, prison, or violent 
death. Now a marvelous truth began to dawn upon them: that they 
were free, in a manner of speaking. 

Tesla would not live to see this. Whether he could ever hove 


accepted the new government, with its Soviet-type Constitution and a 
Soviet affiance, whether he could ever have accepted the permanent 
exile of his beloved monarch, am unanswerable questions. 

Unfortunately however; aO this was to have a bearing on how 
he would be remembered in the West The faffing of his scientific 
reputation, the forgetfulness of Americans in the ppptwar period, 
resulted in large degree from the disappearance of most of hfe scientific 
papers behind that new Cold War phenomenon, the Iron Curtain. 

In 1948 Yugoslavia ceased to be an bon Curtain country 
declaring its Independence from the Soviet doctrine of "limited 
sovereignty" America and her allies then were generous In sending 
economic and military aid to the Slavs; but the damage had been 
done. America had not raced to Tito's wartime support with the 
alacrity that Churchill had shown. In the future it would not be made 
easy for American scholars to draw on Yugoslav sources to document 
the acNevements of Nikola Tesla. 


The inventor became very feeble m the winter of 1942. His 
fear of germs was so obsessive that even his closest friends were 






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DEATH AND TRANSFIGURATION «— ► 266 



January 1, at the request of author Louis Adamid, Mrs. Roosevelt had 
promised to ask the President to write to Tesla and said that the herself 
would call on him on her next trip to New York. The second note ii 
headed, "Memo for Mis. Roosevelt" and Is signed FDR: “ I was having 
this looked Into but the papers yesterday carried the story that Or 
Tesla had dted. Therefore I am returning the enclosures herewith.” A 
third note of January 11 from Eleanor Roosevelt to Adamid forward! 
the Presidents message and adds her sorrow at learning of the 
inventor’s death. 

Adamid wrote a moving eulogy to Tesla that was read by New 
York Mayor FloreUo H LaGuardla over station WNYC on January 
10. u Meanwhile the extreme tensions between Serb and Croat factions 
In the United States were making the planning of funeral services 
difficult The body lay in state but according to an unpublished letter 
of O'Netifs, "only twelve people, some of whom were newspaper 
. reporters," came to view it 

When state services were held at four o'clock on January 12, in 
the Cathedral of St John the Divine, however; more than two 
thousand people crowded in. Serbs and Croats were seated on 
opposing sides of the cathedral. Bishop William T. Manning having 
exacted from both factions a promise of no political speeches. The 
service was begun in English by Bishop Manning and concluded In 
Serbian by the Very Rev Dusan Sukletovid. 

Among Balkan diplomats present were Ambassador Fotic, 
the Governor of Croatia, a former Prime Minister of Yugoslavia, 
and the Minister of Food and Reconstruction. In the front row with 
Kosanovid, chief mourner and head of the important new trade 
mission, sat Swezey Dr. Rado had been too ill to attend as an 
honorary pallbearer 

Figures important in American science and industry who did 
attend as honorary pallbearers Included Professor Edwin H 
Armstrong, Dr E F. W. Alexanderson of General Electric, Dr. Harvey 
Rentschler of Westtnghouse, engineer Gano Dunn, and W. H. Barton, 
curator of the Hayden Planetarium of the American Museum of 
Natural History NewbokJ Morris, president of the New York City 
Coundl, headed this groupi 

When word of Testa's death spread abroad to war-stricken 
Europe, telegrams of tribute and sorrow began pouring in from 
scientists and governmental leaders dike. In the United States three 
Nobel prizewinners in physics, Millikan, Compton, and James Franck, 
Joined in a eulogy to the inventor as "one of the outstanding Intellect* 


Hj** iM—MIHi'jili, 








DEATH AND TRANSFIGURATION «-> 267 


of the world who paved the way for many of the Important technology 
cal developments of modem times." 

The President and Mis. Roosevelt expressed their gratitude for 
‘fob’s contributions "to science and industry and to this country" 
Vice-President Wallace, in the spirit of the new Yugoslavia, declared 
that, "In Nikob fob's death the common man loses one of his best 
friends." * 

Although Louis Adamid wrongly eulogized fob as one who 
had cared nothing for money he could not have been more accurate 
when he said that fob was not reaDy dead: *The real. Important part 
of fob fives In his achievement, which Is great, almost beyond 
calculation, and an Integral part of our ch/itation, our daily foes, our 
current war effort... His Me is a triumph... ."* 

Among the honors that had come to fob In his fife were many 
academic degrees from American and foreign universities; the John 
Scott Medal, the Ecfeon Medal, and various awards from European 
governments. In September 1943 the Liberty ship Ntoto Tesla was. 
bundled, an honor that would have pleased the scientist But not until 
1975 was he Inducted into the National Inventors Hal of Fame. 

Eight months after fob's death, the U.S. Supreme Court 
handed down the decision that he had been confident would coop 
tventuaOy— mfing thqt he was the inventor of radio. 

His body was taken to Femcfiffe Cemetery at Ardsley-on-the- 
Hudson In the deep cold of the winter afternoon. In the car that 
followed the hearse rode Swezey and Kosanovld. The Inventor* 
remains were cremated and his ashes later returned to the land of his 
birth. • 

In almost every nation in the world, the fighting and dying 
continued. I 

'Chariot* Muzar. formally socratary to Sow M Kosanovld, canted fort ashes loth* 
foa Museum In Belgrade In 1967. Throughout th« yean Koaanorit had spoken of 
faring the ashes In America and had hoped an Appropriate memorial lo the Inventor 
would fa rated m the Undid State as tfatr ratting pine*. 

— Archives, fob Memorial Sodsty . 1 





THE MISSING ROPERS «— * 270 



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under the imprint of the Tesla Museum at Belgrade, were eagerly 
awaited by many scientists. But even this work left important quests 
unanswered 

The bulk ofhis papers having vanished from America, rekabli 
Information was harder to come by than the recurring rumors cf 
conspiracy espionage, and patent theft Scientists thought it strangi 
that some aspects of his Colorado Springs research found in scattered 
sources did not appear in the Yugoslav-published Note i Only by 
piecing together fragmentary information could the magnitude of hk 
e xp erim e nt s be comprehended 

Around 1928 O'Neill, by merest chance, had happened to sec 
a legal advertisement In a New York newspaper announcing that tot 
boxes placed In storage by Nikola Tesla would be sold by the storage 
warehouse for unpaid bills. Feeling that such material should be 
preserved, he went to the Inventor and asked per mi s si on to try to 
obtain funds to reclaim the material 

‘Tesla hit the ceiling," he recalled “He assured me he was wd 
able to take care of his own affairs... He forbid me to buy them or do 
. anything In any way about them." 

Shortly after the Inventor died O’Ndfl got In touch with Saw 
Kosanovtt, told him about the boxes, and urged him to protect them 
He was never able to get a positive statement from Kosanovtf that he 
had obtained the boxes and examined the contents. “He gave evasive 
assurances that there was no reason for me to worry .. ." 

Others too were interested in the papers. A young American 
engineer engaged in war work consulted Tesla on a ballistics engineer- 
ing problem because he could not get time on an overworked 
computer, and Tesla’s mind was known to offer the nearest thing to It 
Soon he became fascinated with Tesla V scientific papers and was 
allowed to take batches of them home to his hotel room where he and 
another American engineer pored over them each night They wee 
returned the next day a procedure which continued for about two 
weeks prior to the Inventor's death. 

Tesla had received offers to work for Germany and Russia. 
After the inventor died, both engineers became concerned that critical 
scientific information might fall Into foreign hands and alerted United 
States security agencies and high government officials. 

The relevant records that I have obtained from federal agendas 
under the Freedom of Information Act reveal strange twistings and 
hxonsfeteTKdeslntta handling of tire Inventor's estate Tesla left tons of 
papers, barrels and boxes full of them. But he left no will He was 






M 


THE MISSING ROPERS «-* 271 

ufvtved by five nieces and nephews, of whom two ttved In America at 
toe tin* of Ms death. y 

Curiously; t he j o^ Offlcu of Aten 

P rcperty WnciKi eeated ^coBefeTShica Testa was an 
tha OftreconceffiTln (fie matter was hard to Justify 
After a court hearing, however, thg estaig wag t^ gg^ AnjbMsady 
Koaanovtt. one of ttehefts v 7 - 

-^cr33S^?wfio^T^ hoped to write a biography of Testa (his 
death Intervened), received the following account in 1963 from a 
former aide of Ambassador Kosanovldfc , 

"Back In 1943 ... when Tesla died, It was a mailer of very short 
ttne when Me K was Issued a certificate from or by the Office of 
Custodian of Alen Property conveying to Mt K full rights to the Testa 
papers.... he had them all packed up and sent off to the Manhattan 
Storage Company where they remained unli ready for packing and 
thtpping off to Yugoslavia in 19S2. Mr. K paid for storage charges... 

AB this tone the certificate from the Men PrtSperty Office v« In my 

possession {In case of need).... , . „ 

“You wdl perhaps remember that — * 

^ ^ ^ Jfe^rop^^FKto^^^i^pteserri museum buiBKg 
(^Belgrade, Yugoslavia) the bunch of keys, which was the last thing 
Me K. flung Into the safe at the New Mxker Hotel before the 
combination was re-set to a new combination, were not found In the 
safe, but in an entirely different bos. Abo the gold mecbl (the Erfison 

Medal) was missing from the safe. ... Anyway for years and yean Me 
K was bothered by the fact that Tesla papen had been gone thru and 

Just before his departure from Washington In 1949-60(?) he decided 
to follow my suggestion to call EdmrXHgowH.tslc] and ask htaiMt 

Hoover dented categorically that tWrnlnad gone Into the papers... 

The aide sted Tesla had told his nephew that ‘he wished to 
leave his works, property etc., to his native country" (Not only Is this 
uncorroborated but the papers were in English.) 

Immediately after Testa’s death an exchanged telegrams flew 

between ™ Aomt femutoh. of the field dtvtslon of the New York ^ 
Bureau anSmfffirector of the New York Bureau of the FBL The day 
fdowing discovery of the body Agent Fbxworth reported: 

“Experiments and research of Nikola Tesla, deceased. Es- 
ptonage — M. Nikola Testa, one of the world's outstandtog scientists In 
the electrical Add, died January seventh, nineteen forty three at the 


: v. - ,. 




THE MISSING ROPERS <-» 274 



• . Vi ; 


to Dr. Trump were Willis George, Office of Naval Intelligence, Third 
Naval District, Edward Palmer; chief yeoman, USNR, and John i 
Corbett, chief yeoman, USNR 

Dr. Trump reported afterward that r»c examination was made 
of the vast amount of Tesla's property that had been in the basement of 
the New Yorker Hotel for ten years prior to his death, or of any of hb 
papers except those in his Immediate possession at the time of death. It 
should be remembered that Tesla's scientific reputation had been In 
eclipse for a number of years and that there had been many efforts to 
tiscredt his claims in radio, robotry and alternating current Dr. Trump 
was a busy man. Just as the staff of the FBI was stretched thin by its 
preoccupation with investigating wartime sabotage. 

“As a result of this examination," wrote Dr. Trump, “it is my 
considered opinion that there exist among Dr. Tesla's papers and 
possessions no scientific notes, descriptions of hitherto unrevealed 
methods or devices, or actual apparatus which could be'of significant 
value to this country or which would constitute a hazard In unfriendy 
hands. I can therefore see no technical or military reason why further 
custody of the property should be retained.* 

He added: “For your records, there has been removed to your 
office a file of various written material by D t Tesla which coven 
typically and fairly completely the Ideas with which he was concerned 
during his later years. These documents are enumerated and briefly 
abstracted I n the attachment to this letter." 

In closing Dr. Trump said “It should be no discredit to this 
distinguished engineer and scientist, whose solid contributions to the 
electrical art were made at the beginning of the present century to 
report that his thoughts and efforts during at least the past fifteen yean 
were primarily of a speculative, philosophical, and somewhat promo- 
tional character— often concerned with the production and wireless 
transmission of power— but did not Include new sound, workable 
principles or methods for realizing such results." 

The file (of which Dr. Trump's notes were only an abstract) 
consisted apparently of either photostats or microfilm made by the 
naval officers present, and the original papers apparently remained in 
storage, later to be transmitted to Yugoslavia. The examination had 
failed to disclose any alien-owned property subject to the vesting 
power of the Allen Property Custodian under the Trading with the 







Dt Trump's abstract Included the following: 

"Art of TeJegeodynamkM, at Ait of Producing Terrestrial 
Motions at Distance— This document, In the form of a letter dated 
June 12, 1940, to the Westtnghouse Electric & Manufacturing Co., 
proposes a method for the transmission of large amounts of power 
over vast distances by means of mechanical vibrations of the earth's 
oust The source of power Is a mechanical or electromechanical 
device bolted to tome rocky protuberance and Imparting power at a 
resonance frequency of the eartht crust The proposed scheme 
appears to be completely visionary and unworkable. Westtoghousefc 
reply indicates their polite rejection.... 

“New Art of Projecting Concentrated NorhDbpmlve Energy 
through Natural Medio— This undated document by Tesla describes 
an electrostatic method of producing very high voltages and capable of 
very great power This generator ^lt used to accelerate charged 
particles, presumably elections. Such h beam of high-energy electrons 
passing through air Is the 'concentrated nondbperrive' means by 
which energy to transmitted through natural media. As a component of 
this apparatus there Is described an open-ended vacuum tube within 
which the elections are first accelerated 

“The proposed scheme bears some relation to present means 
for producing high-energy cathode rays by the cooperative use of a 
high-voltage electrostatic generator and an evacuated election acceler- 
ation tube. It Is wefl known, however, that such devices, while of. 
identlllc and medical Interest, are Incapable of the transmission of 
forge amounts of power In nondispersed beams over long distances. 
Tesla’* disclosures In this memorandum would not enable the con- 
jtruction of workable combinations of generator and tube even, of 
kmited power; though the general elements of such a combination are 
succinctly described 

“A Method of Producing Powerful Radiations— an undated 
memorandum in Tesla's handwriting describing 4 a new process of 
generating powerful rays or radiations.' This memorandum reviews the 
works of Lenard and Crookes, describes Tesla's work on the produc- 
tion of high voltages, and finally In the last paragraph gives the only 
description of the Invention contained to the memorandum.... 'Briefly 
Mated, my new simplified process of generating powerful rays consists 


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examined the Ales with Dr Trump The Navy has no record of Testa's 
papers; no federal archives have a record of them. 

Curiously four months after the photostats had been sent to 
Wright Field, Q6L Ralph Doty the chief of Military Intelligence in 
Washington wrote James Markham of Aben Property indicating that 
they had newer been received: This office is In receipt of a communi- 
cation from Headquarters, Air Technical Service Command, Wright 
Field, requesting that we ascertain the whereabouts of the Ales of the 
late scientist, Dt Nlchola (sic) Tesla, Which may contain data of great 
value to the above Headquarters. It has been indicated that your office 

might have these Ales in custody If this is true, we would like to requeri 

your consent for a representative of the Air Technical Service Com- 
mand to review them. In view of the extreme Importance of these files 
to the above command, we would Ake to request that we be advised of 
any attempt by any other agency to obtain them. [Italics supplied.) 

“Because of the urgency of this matter; this communication wl 
be deftvered to you by a Liaison Officer of this office in the hope of 
expediting the solicited Information.'' 

The “other" agency that had the Ales, or should have had 
them, was the Air Technical Service Command itself) Colonel Dotyt 
letter; which was classified under the Espionage Act, was declassified 
on May 8, 1980. 

This embarrassing contret e mps goes unexplained in the rec- 
ords- Perhaps It was handled orally with the Liaison Officer: 

However; on October 24, 1947, 
attorney general and 


\ Office 




wrote to 
tOSfifiBnd, 


Ufrflh* ttw Tffilla that M 

been sent by registered- Jn all on-oratiout SeptemBirfl. 1945. to 
SS^tbeJfltts^ HKiyesL ' 


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records do not reveal that this material has been it 
turned,- said Bazekxi He sent a description and asked that It be 
returned. 


Field 



VWrriWtCTIl UlR W. U IWW WQMI 

J&operty^ 


! to the 


^ Air i 

| Wrlghf^d. His replied: These reports are now in thi 
poss ess ion of the Electronic Subdivision and are being evaluated...* 
He believed that the evaluation should be completed by January 1, 


Jk. 


1948, and ‘At that time your office wffi be contacted with respect to 
Inal disposition of these papers." 


TheraJsflP written, ^ 

rormamure&ri there have been 


T-many.year» there have been rumors &5 these unpatented 
Inventions or concepts of Tesla's found their way not only to the U S. 
Army Air Force but to Russia and to private American defense 
Industries, and ultimately into certain university research laborato ri es 
engaged In be^sp weaponry A t f 

The urnce oT Auefrftoperty experienced a very difficult 
problem over the yean in explaining its role In connection with Tesla’s 
papsre Between 1948 and 1978 It Issued the foUowtng variations on a 
theme to many inquirers: 

“While this Office participated in an examination of certain 
material owned by the late Or Telia, our records do not disclose that 
any such material has been vested or is presently under the Jurisdiction 
of this Office..." v 

-This Office has never had custody ... of any property of 
Nikola Testa...” 

‘While the Tesla papers were In our custody.” 

‘Photostatic copies of .pertain documents, made while the 
oaoere were under our seaL . . 

“In 1943 this Office placed a seal on the property ..." v 
“While the Tesla papers were In our custody..." etc., etc., etc. 

As for what Is now Headquarters Aeronautical Systems Divi- 
sion, Wright-Ptitterson Air Force Base, Ohio, they state: The organiza- 
tion (Equipment Laboratory) that performed the evaluation of Tesla's 
papers was deactivated several years ago After conducting an exten- . 
rive search of lists of records retired by that organization, in which we 
found no mention of Tesla's papers, we concluded the documents 
wen destroyed at the time the laboratory was deactivated."* (Italics 
supplied Response, uryfer the Freedog iof jgfefga attan Ant,, dafrjd Jgjy 
30,^1980.) ’• '.“s ^ 

" Tesla's original papers, and the remaining models of his 
Inventions — his magnifying transmitter; robot boats, early tube light- 
ing, Induction motors, turbine, exhibits shown at the Chicago Workfs 
Fair of 1893, such as the “Egg of Columbus," and others— -left America 
In 1952 for Yugoslavia. His ashes were sent later The artifacts may 
now be seen at the Tesla Museum In Belgrade, a dignified-looking 
building with a broad, well-proportioned facade at No. 51 Proieterskih 




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THE MISSING ROPERS <— ► 280 



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Brigade an avenue renamed after the war; but formedy known undo 
the monarchy as Crown Street The museum bears a plaque on a low 
wad, printed in the old Cyrillic alphabet 

Here Tesla's English writings have been translated into Serbo- 
Croatian — except as the archivist admits, for the "unimportant* 
material, which remains, just as He wrote It in the language of his 
adopted country 



Uk 








The Legacy 


The fact that Tesla's research notes and papers have not been easdy 
available for western scientists has not, of course, meant that Tesfian 
research is dead On the contrary the vary mystery surrounding some 
of Ms unproved claims has served to goad numerous scientists into 
trying to duplicate hi$ experiments. And since his aspirations were 
virtually limitless, there has always been a chance that the rewards of 
success would not be Inconsiderable. But the single greatest stimulus 
to try to follow In Tesla's footsteps doubtless remains the example of 
the man himself— his stunning record d achievement and the endur- 
ing fascination of his mind As one admiring German writer put it, 
Tesla went beyond the borders of Ms exact sdence to foretell what lies 
In the future ... a modern Prometheus who dared teach for the 
riafs...." 1 v 

Although a comprehensive summary of the state of Tesla* 
Inspired research today would be beyond either the scope of this book 
or the intent of its author, no account of the inventor's fife would be 
complete without at least some indication of what has become of a few 
of Ms major preoccupations. The record, as one might expect, is both 
mixed and Incomplete, but it is no less Impressive for that 

Tobegfn, then, with Tesla's experiments with ball lightning: He 
had no Idea what bafl lightning might be useful for when be first 
encountered it In his Colorado Springs research; to him It was a 
nuisance, but It demanded an explanation. And so he set about 
determining the mode of formation of the strange fireballs and learn* c 
to produce them artificially 

The technical explanation runs Ike this: In the highly resonan. 
transformer secondary comprising Ms magnifying transmitter ; the 
entire energy accumulated in the excited circuit, instead of requiring a 
quarter period for transformation from static to kinetic, could spenc 
todf In less time, at hundreds of thousands of horsepower. Thus, for 
example, Tesla produced artificial ftrebafis by suddenly causing the 
toywaa e d o s dHatton s to be more rapid than free ones of the second- 






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THE LEGACY «-* 286 

valued wavelength to establish a standing wavs condition. Tab 
bebeved the propagation path fell along a dfametet But according to 
much knowledge developed since 1899, the propagation path woitfd 
not be.abng a diameter but, father along an ellipsoidal arc aomewhsn 
between the diameter and the spherical surface. 

A fundamental aspect of wave propagation of power to that no 
power Is transmitted (f the wave is standing; power is transmitted solely 
with a traveling component Boundary layer propagation, Le., the 
mode of k>ssless propagation ot waves at the bounded two differ^ 
media (such as earth and sky), is a viable concept However the 
boundary plane must be smooth and the waves must be property 
launched. At the frequencies Tesla was using, such launching appara- 
tus would be an enormous structure. In exambiing the photographs of 
his experimental station at Colorado Springs, It is apparent to experts 
that he did not employ apparatus essential to the launching of such 
waves 

Tesla probably was mistaken ait Colorado Springs In till 
interpretation of At lightning storms which he observed traveling away 
from him (eastwardly) across the plains, producing maxima and 
minima effects upon his Instruments. This he interpreted as standing 
waves being set up In the Earth by the traveling storm, with the aesti 
of the waves passing through his location as the storms advanced k Is 
believed he was seeing an Interference effect caused by the reradatlng 
surface of the frontal range of mountains to the west of his station. The 
results would have been the same on his instruments. 

Dr. Walt, formerly senior scientist at the Environmental Re- 
search Laboratories, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administra- 
tion, in Colorado, describes himself as a “firm skeptic” of the Tesb 
theory “The concept that electromagnetic energy penetrates 'through 
the earth,*" he says, “is valid only If the frequency is sufficiently be 
and if the distances are small lt% all tied up with 'skin-effeef 
phenomena; that means that the field Is confined to the surface of s 
good conductor as in metafile wave guide." 4 

Dt Wait even goes so far as to suggest that Tesla never really 
accepted the fact that electromagnetic waves could transport energy 
through the ait “Instead he thought of the earth Itself as a conveyor 
and also thought of the possibility of a return conductor at heights ci 
15 miles above sea level' The parallel of this Idea. to the earth- 
ionosphere wave guide at extremely low frequencies is striking (set 
IEEE Journals of Oceanic Engineering , Vol OE-2, No. 2, April 1977) 
Also his proposed resonance of the system might be interpreted as the 
first disclosure of the earth-ionosphere cavity oscillations that hare 


been associated from the early 1960s with W O Schumann, N. 
Christofik®, and Jl Gaiejs, among others." 1 

With respect to wireless communication, the US. Navy’s 
Project Sanguine/Seafarer of recent years has evolved from Testa's 
Colorado experiments. In a thermonuclear war; conventional radio 
communication probably would be disrupted at certain heights and 
wavelengths. Americas atomic submarine fleet might then be without 
a means of receiving messages. The US Navy seeing this danger, 
turned back to Tesla's nineteenth-century suggestion of employing 10 
Hz signals (ELF or extra low frequency), to drde the globe and 
penetrate the deepest waters. 

One of the headier speculations concerning Teslian science Is a 
suggestion that Russia hat been employing his theories on weather 
modification to Interfere with the Jet stream, causing droughts and 
extremes of hot and cold weather: However unlikely the charge, it is 
true that Tesla (fid do a good deal 6i theorizing (but very tittle 
experimentation) on weather control ! 

He wrote, for example, pn the possible use of radkxonttoQed 
missiles and explosives to break up tornadoes and the use of “tightnlno 
of a certain kind" to trigger rainfall Of the former he said, “It would not 
be difficult to provide special automata for this purpose, carrying 
explosive charges, liquid air or other gas, which could be put into 
action, automatically or otherw&e, and which would create a sudden 
prassure or suction, breaking up the whirl The missiles themselves 
might be made of material capable of spontaneous ignition." His 
proposal included a lengthy mathematical formula. 4 

As with much modem scientific exploration inspired by the 
maestro, the returns are still not in on weather changing. Scientist 
Frederic Jueneman, “Innovative Notebook" columnist for Industrial 
Research magazine, calls attention to the fact that Dr. Robert HeflhveP 
and John Katsufralds of Stanford University's Radio Science Labora- 
tory demonstrated that very low frequency radio waves can cause 
osdfiatkms In the magnetosphere. With a 20-km antenna and a 5 kHz. 
transmitter in the Antarctic, they found that the earth's magnetosphere 
could be modulated to cause high energy partides to cascade into our 
atmosphere, and by turning the signal on or off they could start or stop 
the energy flow 

“The theoretical Implication suggested by their work," says 
Jueneman, “is that gM*l weather control can be attained by the 
Infection of relatively small 'signals? Into the \fen Allen betts—eome- 
tNng tike a super-transistor effect" ' 

But Jueneman's speculations go further and ate eminently 







mi 

mm 


: I 


•r 


THE LEGACY 4— > 288 

worthy of Testa: “If Testa's resonance effect*, as shown bythe Stanford 
team, can control enormous energies by miniscule triggering signals 
then by an extension of this principle we should be able to affert the 
field environment of the wry stars In the sky. ..With godfike ~ 
rogance. we someday may yet direct the stars In their courses."* 

No biography of Tesla would be complete without mention d 

his bright following of amateur physldstt who build Tesla colls for Ih* 

personal research, endeavoring to replcate his electrical magic; and 
the young Inventors who pore over Ws baric patents and still And 
Inspiration from them. 

DurllnC. Cox, a Wisconsin physicist who has pondered TesM 
published writings, has bulk two Tesla colls, the second of 10 mitton 
volts. The reasons: “My own personal Interest In high voltage engineer- 
ing, especially In the field of high frequency rf transformers; to further 
my studies on the laboratory production of ball Ightning; and becauss 
the Unlwrslty of Wisconsin at Madison asked me to submit a Tesla cd 
In their bi-annual Engineering Exposition In the spring of 1981." Hr 
and friends buflt one Tesla coil for a Hollywood studio for lightning 
effects, which has been a common use of them. 

Electrical engineer Leland Anderson has summarized the 
major points In design that a coll builder might gain from reading 
lesla'i Colorado Springs Notes: 

1. The Q's of the primary and secondary must be as high at 
practicable. 

2. The Q’s of the primary and secondary should be equal 

3. The length of the secondary wincfing should be one-quart*, 
of the effective operating wavelength. 

4. The technique of using an “extra coil" tank circuit (or a 

variation of It) In the secondary to magnify the voltage should be used 

"With these criteria In mind," he says, “the builder will find that 
hundreds of turns are not necessary for the secondary winding to 
achieve high voltages.” . 

Last but not least, what about Tesla's death/disintegrator trays? 
Were his concepts sound? If they were found useful by the U.S. Amy 
Air Force research team, whose top-secret project was rumored to 
haw had the code name “Project Nick," It may be safely assumed thri 
Instead of being “destroyed," as reported, his papers are still higfy 
classified. 

Dt Trump's evaluation and Swezey% assessment of TesM 
"secret weapon^* have, however; received updated concurrence by 


THE LEGACY 


289 


Lambert Dolphin, assistant director of the Radio Physics Laboratory at 
SRI international, who has studied the inventor’s work and his bal> 
Ightning rese ar c h for two decades. He points out that the fields of 
knowledge of both physics and electrical engineering have pown 
exponentially since about 1930. 

“Whole libraries are now required Just to keep track of afi the 
theory and experience that haw unfolded since Tesla's time,” he says. 
"Our mathematical and practical understanding of electricity; magne- 
tism, electromagnetic theory; and radio communications has con- 
tinued to grow explosively ever since 1950, or should I say 1970T’ 

Tesla, Dolphin bedews, ‘may haw had intuitive Insight Into 
lasers and high-energy particle beams as wefi as ultra-high voltage 
phenomena, but now that we understand al the physics much more, 
we can easily evaluate many of his extravagant later-life dahnt."" 

In fad, there Is no good evidence to suggest that Tesla 
an ticipated lasers. Hh “teleforce taurf* seem tahaw been concerned 
exclusively with high-energy particle beams. We stifi do not know 

precisely how he Intended them to work, although, says Dolphin, the 
available evidence, suggests that Testa may not haw paid sufficient 
attention to how greatly such beams may be absorbed or dispersed by 

molecules and atoms In the ate In any case, ewn If we did un derstand 

Teslas Intentions more dearly we should be hard, put to compare 
them to the current state of the art, much of which Is hidden under 
high security classifications. 

Nevertheless, Tesla's work with high voltages to accelerate 
charged particles does seem to haw been deddedly In what Is now the 
mainstream of physical research. “In this field," says DolpMn. “he 
anticipated modem linear and circular nudear accelerators. Such 
machines today haw energy lewis of tens of billions of electron volts or 

at least 1,000 times greater energy lewb than Testa ewr attained. 

“I am sure his magnifying transmitters were s pe ct acular... He 
probably generated some Interesting arcs and sparks that were what 
we now study as plasmas. The containment of plasmas it a huge area 
of modem physics. For example... to see If small amounts of matter 
can be turned Into Immense amounts of electrical power In carefuly 
contained plasmas." But Testa* early discoveries and Inventions, he 

concludes, were Indeed ingenious and ahead of their time." 

As this book goes to press, the Pentagon Is studying the 
creation of a new branch of the armed services, to be known as the 
U3. Space Command, whose primary arsenal will consist of laser and 
partide-beain weapons fired from ’space battleships." In prow not 


ti; J- 









THE LEGACY <— * 290 


unlike Tesla's own, a Department of Defense fact sheet compaies 
particle beams to “directed lightning boltf —although without ex* 
pfidtfy admitting that such a weapon has in fact been developed. 

It is dtfficuk to assess the current state of the beam-weapons 
program because virtually everything about It is heavily classified 
Apparently the technology involved has proved to be complex and 
difficult, raising questions about the project's feastbOtji but many 
experts nevertheless seem to be hard at work on the problem. At the 
same time, the activities of the other nations In this area have been 
monitored carefully by agencies of the federal government Indeed the 
possibility of creating a family of particle-beam weapons has been a 
subject of serious dscussion In this country for at least the past twenty- 
five years, and it Is, in my opinion, of no little significance that as long 
ago as 1947 the Military Intelligence Service Identified the writlngt 
about a particle-beam among Tesla's scientific papers as being “of 
extreme importance." 

Since he had no laboratory In the later yean of his fife. Tests 
was unable to develop his Ideas. But tt is unde n iable that he described 
In general term* half a century ago what may prove to be one of the 
main weapons of the Space Age. And to the end of hb days, Tesla the 
pacifist hoped that such knowledge would be used, not for war among 
Earthlings, but for Interplanetary communication with our neighbors In 
space, of whose existence he felt certain. 




Bibliographical Essay 

Some of Tested own writing— tortures, articles, patents, papers, and 
letters— 4s now available in the United States* hfis most I mportan t 
lectures and his brief autobiography In bound volumes, are listed hi 
the prologue to the reference notes. 

Citation of biographies of Tesla by O’Neifl, Hunt, and Drapes; 
and others may be found in the reference notes* The O'Netil man- 
uscript and the Swezey Collection are to be found at the Smithsonian 
Institution, Dibner library 

Serious Tesla scholars will wish to consult the annotated Dr 
Mkoto Teste Bibliography by A T. Ratzteff, and L. L Anderson (San 
Carlos, California, Ragusan Press, 1979), for It contains tome 3,000 
sources of writings by and about Tesla. “Priority In the invention of 
Radio, Tesla u Marconi," by Leland Anderson may be obtained 
through the Antique Wireless Association, Monograph New Series No: 
4 

A new means of analyzing Teste's inventions Is provided in. Dr. 
Nikola Tesla: Selected Patent Wrappers from Tha National Archives, 
by A T. Ratzteff (MiDbrae, Ca., Teste Book Co., I960). These "file 
wrapper? provide explanations and corresp on dence between the 
patentee and the Ptitent Office, to overcome objections raised by the 
examiner 

, Teste’s Colorado Springs Notes, 1899-1900, published in 
1978 by the Teste Museum, Is available through Notit, Teraztye, 27, 
Belgrade, Yugoslavia. 

The Library of Congress Manuscripts Division contains micro- 
film correspondence between Teste and George Scherff, Robert 
Underwood Johnson, Mark Twain, members of the Morgan family 
George Westinghouse, and the Westinghouse Electric and Manufac- 
turing Company 

In addition original correspondence and photographs may be 
found at the Butler Library Rare Books and Manuscripts, Columbia 
University inducting letters between Teste and Johnson, Sdrerff, and 




bid, 

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' i 
I 

■ J 
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■ 1 JMEROUS REFERENCE 

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Freedom of Information Release 

On 

Subject: Nikola Tesla 

Cross References 
Pages Reviewed -127 
Pages Released -127 



Federal Bureau of Investigation 



0 


Mr. Edgar Hoover, Director, v 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
Washington, D.C. 


Q 

February 12, 1937 


R ; 


My dear Mr. Hoover: 

I do not know whether or not the recent series of 
air crashes on the west coast has attracted the at- 
tention of your department, or whether, if investi- 
gation were indicated, the Jurisdiction would be 
your own. An idea as to the cause of these crashes 
has occurred to me, however, and I thought it might 
bear a bit of checking up. ' t 

If you will check newspaper files as far back as I 

1934, I believe you will find that the earliest of j 

the unexplained ( and apparently unexplainable crash- ' 
es) occurred about that time. 

As I remember the events, it was during that year 

that three small planes exploded in the air over } 

Texas and southwestern Kansas^ and Oklahoma. These j 

crashes were not accounted for, either by subsequent j 

investigation where the plane occupants were killed 

or by the experience of surviving plane occupants 

in one case. ! 

i 

Following these tragedies there came a lapse of about I 
a year, after which there occurred (likewise without 
apparent reason) the series of crashes which cost the 
lives of a senator, of Knute Rockne, and a number 
of others. All crashes again occurred in the South 
and Southwest. 


Again there was a lapse of time, this one not qqite 
a year, and there started the worst series of air 
disasters the country has yet seen. One plane lost 
in the Southwest and not yet accounted for. One plane 
crashes into a mountainside within sight of its air- 
port. And now the most recent incident, the falling 
of a United liner into San Francisco Bay while cir- 
cling its airport, preparatory t p-l& n ding - ; - 

Kl jUj 

Now in this most 
the radio operator at the airport ^seems to me to be !1 
highly illuminating. This operator reported a soft .. 
buzz interrupting his communication 9fimier : - 

a loud roar such as produced by the worst, imagine 


;, preparatory t » via n axn g-: : 

Xniuk:o & lisOEXEiW L2 — /l 7/£ LfQ — I 
r ec ent inc id ent|/- -ti^^x^rxenc ~ " 

ir fit. t-.ho alrnnrt Feooms tft mo t-.o .fto* ‘ 


able static ... then silence. The plane Mi 
into the bay like a plummet. /?/! 


'opped 




1 Mr 


r*u 


- 2 - 




-Crack pilots do not sudd'enly become rank hams and 
bungle in handling a ship. Nor do the three motors 
(or even t?/o) on the large airliners, stop simul- 
. taneously without extremely s if fie lent'- reason. 

Th ese things might happen once or even twice in 
a lifetime. They do not happen six and eight times 
a year. It is not logical that they should. 

To digress for a moment, I recalls reading an article 
in a magazine a year or two ago, written by glkflj p,— 
\Tesla_, the inventor. The article dealt with a new 
l ‘Tffiyention of Mr. Tesla's ... a giant induction coil 
which would project power (high voltage) through the 
atmosphere without the use of transmission wires. 

Mr. Tesla devoted some space to the possible social 
benefits that would result to the public should his 
invention be perfected and become practical. 

I have not heard of Ur. Tesla now in two or three 
years. Perhaps he has left the country. Perhaps he 
is still here. He might still be working on the in- 
vention described in the above-mentioned article. 

It might have been stolen from him. 

In any case, his views on the ideas presented by these 
two unconnected subjects, would he well worth while 
having. And if I had the money and the time, I should 
certainly make an effort to smoke him out myself. 

The thing is simply this: if one man can make an in- 
strument that will project power through the air for 
even so short a distance as 500 yards (the then- 
practical limitations of Mr. Nikola's device) it is 
entirely possible for another to project power for 
several hundreds of miles. And the effect of such 
uncontrolled power on metallic objects in its path 
is entirely unpr edict able. 

Please do not think me a "crank" letter writer. I 
have never before written a letter of this type to 
anyone. But the idea seems to me so within the bounds 
of possibility that I most sincerely feel it will 
bear some practical study. 



4-750 (Rev. 9-29-95) 


xxxxxx 

xxxxxx 

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11 ) 11)01 



I 


• EOGAR HOOVER 
DIRECTOR 
> 

* „ J 



G 


?rbrral 8»urcau of inurstigiatu 
Uuitrb ^tatrs Department of 3uatire 
filnsljingtan, D. C. 


Mr. E.A. Tama<_ 

Mr. Clegg 

Mr. Glavin 

Mr. Ladd 


JP,L:ed 


January 11, 1942 


.1 r>3 1 8 



MEMORANDUM FOR 


hr. 


Mr. Nichol s_ 

Mr. Rosen 

Mr. Tracy 

Mr. Carson 

Mr. Coffey 

Mr. Hendoa__ 

Mr. Kramer 

Mr. McGuire. 
Mr. Harbo 


RE: SY’V 

TX?rRII.*E? T 7r A: 7 *) * -^SVAP.CH 
C? KIKCI/ VESLA (Deceased) 

ESFjr.iv _ }f 


Mr. Quinn Tamm. 

Tele. Room 

Mr. Nease 


MissBeahm. 

MlTTCa^ 

In a teletype -from the New York Cff5.ce dated January 9, 1 94 5 . ^ 
t* e Bureau’s advice is. requested ar to whet Ration should be taken in ^ f » T ' 

correction with tl^ic /natter. It is to be ro*ed that Tesla died January 7, 194c’, 
and resided 8t the^ttotel New Yorker* He was one of the world’s outstanding 
scientists in the eleSb-ical field end h.RS beer conducting many experiments 
in connection vrlt^T vrirefess transmission of electrical power and wnat is 
commonly referred to as the "Death Ray" 


£ 9V t Kosanovich, a distant relative intensely disliked by Tesla, is 

to get possession o r these important documents and plans. Kosanovich 
on January 7, 1946, with Geor fe^Jciark, in charge of the liaseum and Laboratory for 
RCA, and KenrethAswezey of Brooklyn, New York, entered Tesla’s rooms in" toe Hotel 


taking steps t 


vo W Yorker and. 


the rid of a locksmith, broke into a safe containin': some 


of Tesla’s valuable papers, including important electrical formulae, designs, 
et cetera. 

*’ • 

Tesla is reported to have completed erd perfected his experiments in 

the radio transmission of electrical power and to have conceived ar.d designed 
e revolutionary type, of torpedo not presently in use by eny nation. It is 
reported that Kosanovich nay possibly make this material available to the eneny. 


I called *ir. Donegnr. of the New York Office at 12:30 F.M. and pointed 
out the apparent burglary violation on .the part of Kosanovich. I told him this 
matter should be discreetly discussed with the State’s Attorney in New York City 
with a view to locating Kosanovich and anprehending him on a burglary charge in 
order to determine the nature of the material he took from Tesla’s sefe. I 
pointed cut the necessity for the State’s Attorney keeping any action most secret 
in view of the highly confidential neture of the plans involved. I also suggested 
that the New York Office contact the Surrogate Court in order that Tesla’s effects 
as well as the contents of his safety deposit boxes might not be entered without 
the presence of a Bureau Agent in order that we may ende avor tc preserve the 
secrecy of any plena or items essential to thft ccyiduc 



security. 




TV-* 


V i 


I ' 


& 


\ H ■ 

-* h- _ Pftsoe t 


1 

V 





! 





! I < 


FSP:A5 


January 21, 1943 


V 




SIC, Mew York 


'**' Dear Sir* 



/ 


le* OTraare stojbctsj sjlva JCosujoviCHj 

EXPERIMENTS AMD RESEARCH OP SXEOIA TESLA (Deoeased) 
KSPICMOOE (X) i 

Reference le Bade to a teletype dated January 9, 1943* Aram the q! ^ 
Mew York field Office and to a phone conversation between Kr« J. B. Little / ^ 
of the Bureau and Aeeietant Special Agent in Cbarjgs Donegan on January 11, 

1943. . * 

It wee pointed oat Boneggn that Sara losanovioh, George 

Clark and lenneth Swesey a eyr iMt cormltVed • burglary violation by entering 
Tesla's roans after his dentil and pertieuJfcrJjr by nelng a lookeaith to get 
Into a safe containing sane Tesla** fnlnable papers* Mr* Donegan was 
adrised this natter should be dlecreetSgT discussed with the State's Attorney, 

Hew York City* with e wiser to locating Roeanovleh and apprehending bin on a 
burglary charge, in order to ascertain the nature of the naterial taken from 
the safe of Nikola Tesla. It was also suggested that the Hew York Office 
contact the Surrogate Court, in order that Tesla's effects, as well as the 
contents of his safety deposit boxes, night not be entered without the presence 
of an Agent, in order that the eeoreoy ef any plows or Items essential to 
the oonduct of the war or national security eight be preserved. It was stated 
that losanorioh might possibly make certain material available to tha enemy. 

A review of the Bureau files reveals considerable information concern- 
\ ing Nikola Tesla and hia inventions and it should bs noted t hat one Nicola 
* Tesla, who might have been identioal with Nikola Teals, mads s speech at the 
Grange iBall, Springfield, Massachusetts, on June 4# 1922, ibdfgr- tbs auspioss 
of thelfrbnda of Soviet Russia* “ m * 

4r* Tol«on - m c; - • < ^ 

Jr. E. A. T»mm_ further appear* that Sava Koeanovieh may - tSPiijentical with an 
Mr. c i e of the sane name, who is a meaber of the Yvgosl^rvisi? Government 
»!r. G 1 h v ih-exile • An eTiVnftl^n ^f-jOnr -file a reveals thBt£"Aml\$a&'-)ttaanorich, 

,!r * L * gd de sc rib ed bf^Su^ly, arrived with other Yugoslavian Government 


jw 


I 


ch 6iTio4ala ni Norfolk, Sept*&ber 4# 1941 jR on t £• S§ City of 


/Jr.iNi 

■ ?r; Rosog^g^r, a hrltllh ^hipj from Cape ^Town en route to t& Uaiied kingdom. via 
•Mr. Trgq f^^hin cton and Canada^ i<iA<fO-3$J2p-2) | 

Mr. Carroo JHi>i ♦* *■' • A 

*.tr. Coffey In another Instance.. $he name of Sava Nl'Kosanovich appears on the 

Mr. Kea-i stat ione ry of ' the ^Atral.ai>i c Rast ;rn European Planning Board (Cttchoalovakia, 


c?b 


eGui Tb m 
trbo 


uinn Taznm_ 

l&Sfc 


QCT2&UM 


A » 


S 6 F r L 

t, v - l *,• U- 


¥ 


r % 

y 






\ 


/ 



Oreeoo, Poland, Tugoslavia). On this letterhead Eosanovich Is described as 
Chfiraar* of the Board and Minister of State tor Yugoslavia. it is abated 
that this Board is interested in "planning tor postear Europe". (100-99042) 

In' still another file it is disclosed that Sara Kosanorioh, a 
Serbian, was a Maher of one of ths Yugoslavian einorlty parties and Then an 
eaergsacy governaent to overthrow an alilanoo with the Axis was foraed, 
he was included ae an official. Be is allsgsd to be a Oowaunlst and Is 'said 
to receive $1,250 a nonth salary from tl exiled Yugoslavian Oo rarna ant. Be 
and other exiled gorernaent officials are stated tc oee these large salaries 
to flnanoe every Serbian paper In ths United States except "Srbobran" published 
at Pittsburgh. ( 97 - 1340 - 18 ) 7 

Mo record of Kenneth ftwesey oould be located in the Bureau files 
frae the inf creation eve liable. 


The foregoing inforwation is being furnished for possible future 
raferenoe in connection with this oaee and It is desired that the Bureau be 
kept promptly and currently inf ormed of all darrolopnents in this case. 

Tory truly yours. 


John Edgar Hoover 
Director 


t 


? 

i 

k 

3fct>cral Surcnu of {nursttsatton 

United State a iBep artment of ifuattce 
New York, Sew York 



EBC:FM 

65-12290 


March 19, 1943 


Director, FBI 

Re: UNKNOWN SUBJECTS; SAVA^fcoSANOVICH; y/ 

EXPERIMENTS AND RESEARCH OF NIKOIA'TESLA 

(Deceased) . 

ESFIONAGE, MISCELLANEOUS 

Dear Sir: 

Reference is made to the Bureau letter in the above-captioned 
matter dated January 21, 1943, in which it is steted that it is desired that 
the Bureau be kept promptly and currently informed of all developments in this 
case. 


In view of a telephone call from Mr. Little of the Bureau 
to Mr. T. J. Bonegen, Assistant Special Agent in Charge of the New York 
Office, dated January 14, 1943, in which Mr. Little stated that the above- 
captioned matter was now being handled as an Alien Enemy Custodial Detention 
matter and therefore no further action should be taken in the matter by the 
New York Field Division, this case is being considered closed in thi6 Office, 
•unless advised to the contrary by the Bureau at some future time. 


Very truly yours. 



r « 







Special Agent In Charge 



COPIES DESTROYED 
148 OCT 26 I960 





.CP 


,*S> 








FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


Form No. 1 

THIS CASE ORIGINATED AT NEW YORK ClTYj N«Y« 


FILE NO. IOC-8189 


REPORT MADE AT 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 


DATE WHEN MADE 

3-29-k3 


PERIOD FOR 
WHICH MADE 

3-ohu3 


REPORT MADE BY 


CHARLES J... FOSTER 


:MHR 


SAVA K. KOSANOVICH, with alias 
Sava M. Cosonovitch 


CHARACTER OF CASE 


INTERNAL SECURITY G. 
CUSTODIAL DETENTION 




SYNOPSIS OF FACTS: 


/' 1 





REFERENCE i 


Subject SAVA 
State to Y 
Resides Na- 
have turned 
Alien Property 


OVICH, Secretary of.,. 
Government in exLlV. 
j-NYC. Reported to 
ents and effects to 
odian, NYC, for NICK 
TESLA. ABE'SPANEL advised subject for 
United Nations and desires to become U.S. 
citizen. -. v 

iU 

- R u c - ttEKfitlJ IS UBCLAS 


miwM 




Letter from New York Field Division dated 2-22-1 


ViGC 


DETAILS t AT DOVER. DELAWARE 

It is t£\be noted that subject's correct name is SAVA M. KQSANOVICH anc. not 
COSOKOViTCH as carried in reference letter. 

Ur. ABE SPANEL, President of the International Latex Corporation, advised that 
the subject is presently the Secretary of State to the Yugoslavian Government 
in exile and that he resides at the Navaro Hotel, New York City. He stated that 
he had been a very good friend of ffiC&jTESLA who has died recently and that 
he believes that the subject is a third or fourth cousin of TESLA and that 
when TESLA died, the subject was his only close relative in this country and 
TESLA's effects came into his possession. 


SPANEL related that the subject had recently turned over to the government 
the majority of the patents of -NICK TESLA. SPANEL described TESLA as being 
one of the greatest inventors that has ever lived. He stated he h&d more than 


APPROVED AND - SrcciAJ. AOCWT 

FORWARDED: ^ ^ r*l CHAMC 

DO NOT WRITE IN THESE SPACES gfT 


wmuMM&smsm 

RECORD T i 

148 OCT report • -A 

(*>. - Bureau \ 

U - NYC (2 G-2) 2 2 1343 > 

2 - Baltimore C 1 O'' — > 

. ’ 1 
4 

v 

’ 1 


! ! 


■ » ux/ ‘ 

V. a WiTMH.Urt r*MTM MTKI 7 —'jv:t4 







100 - 818 ? 



900 inventions and patents* SPANEL stated that at one time TESLA had 
an invention in which he was able to direct electrical current without 
the means of a conductor* Hs felt that this type of an invention would 
be of invaluable assistance to any country at war and for tblsreason 
felt that TESLA's inventions and patents should be put into the hands 
of proper Government officials* where they might be put to tbs best 
advantage for the United States* Be does not believe the sxijjeat is 
engaged in any un-American activities end stated that he was more than 
willing to turn these patents end inventions over to the proper * Govern- 
ment agency* Hs asserted that before TESLA died* be had spoken to the 
subject regarding his beoooing a United States citlsen and SPANEL 
believes that he is now taking the proper steps to achieve that sod* 

SPANEL also stated that the -subject had handed all of the effects of 
tbs deceased TESLA to the Alien Property Custodian in New York City* 

SPANEL advised that the day before TESLA died he had tried to get in \ 
touch with War Department officials in Washington in order that he might 
make available to then patents and inventions that he had developed* 
However* he was not able to get in touch with the proper authorities 
and hs died tbs following day. 

SPANEL advised that the Yugoslavian Government had been sending TESLA 
approximately $600*00 per month for sometime prior to his death and 
this was described as being a sort of pension* 

SPANEL stated further that he has previously turned over information 
regarding the subject to Special Agent FRED B. CORNELL of the New York 
Field Division* He also ad-deed that WALDQfER KEMPFERT, Science Editor* 
New York Times and BILL LAUBENZ* Science Feature Writer* New York Times 
and the Science Editor of the Herald Tribune would be able to elaborate 
on some of the accomplishments of NICK TESLA and that the June 1900 
issue of the Century Magazine also contained an article relating to 
the inventions of TESDL* 



SPANEL also stated that hs believed BLOICE FITZGERALD* Pierpont Hotel* 
Brooklyn* New York* Secretary to TESLA* has been contacted by Special 
Agent CORNELL and that if the New York Offic e wishes to co 


hs mar be reache 


- REFERRED UPON COMPLETION TO THE OFFICE OF ORIGIN - 


- 2 





JOHN EDGAR HOOVER 
.:Ot.i£CTOR 


, CC-287 


•/ 



FLV.:lem 
2:45 p.Ti. 


i.Jcral Surratt of Inurstigation 
,r * trfc States Department nf justice 
fifaslimgtort, D. GL 

July 17, 1943 


MEMORANDUM FOR Mt i 

Hi: SAVA KOSANOVICH 

UiTEEuAl, SLCdhlTY (U) 
. CUSTODIAL DETEiiTIOri 




Mr. Tolton 

Mr. E. A. Ttmm_ 

Mr. Clegg 

Mr. Glavin 

Mr. Ladd 

Mr. Nichols 

Mr. Rosen 

Mr. Tracy 

Mr. Ctrsoo 

Mr. Coffey 

Mr. Hendon 

Mr. Kramer 

Mr. McGuire 

Mr. Harbo 


Mr. Quinn Tamm, 

Tele. Room 

Mr. Neaie 


Miaa Biih m/ 


At this ti:ne SA John Par.-cer of th e Mew York office teler 
,ating on the previous afternoon 

R telephoned that office t h i ■ ■ c e ..e—L 

urer, author and traveler. |^^^^^HH|Vstated tna^sh^^3c like 
to be interviewed conceminr certain inRrnst^t^he possessed relatj&SafaL. iX 
l' , t~“*;lavieii activities and, in particular, data" 'Which she Has c v.ce^jig 
by t;.e name of Kosanovich, whocs in* t j' jc art eae:r.y &*ent. 

stated she v.as preparing statements of fact v>:'.ici she intends to tu’-n over to. 

Kosanovich. one aovised sr.e v.as Mr..,- th he r 

[iQ car, be reacr.eo at ner snores.*, v.hic' is! 



Arent Par..er stated ■* •• ; re.;tdy rtferrin * to cava nos ar.ovich 

a. id added tr.is inuiviojal is ;.t,aij.i(u _.j tv.o teletypes v; rden tne Kev. Yorr. 
office forwarded to the Bureau under cates of January 9 and 12, i943> in the 
case entitled UiiddO....' SUEJBCTS, FC.tI?..-lLrtT, 'rl.TrT.JL.iTS Ar.D h?.oro-.;.C.o Or .•.xwLAfldLfl. 
iTCE>.nl‘D, tcPI j.«nlt *a (Bureau file lo , J-22p7). briefly, tne information contained i. 
these telety.es is that shortly after Nicola Tesla, one of the worlc's outstanding 
scientists in the electrical field, died in nis hotel i-oom at Nev. Yor.< City on 
January 3, 1943* Sava Kosanovich, a distant relative, ana other inoividu&ls :. v — 
entered rds room and opened a safe, examinin' certain materials v.dch he ..osscssed. 
On January 6, or. L. 41. C. Smith of tne Department auvised ,Lr. 7'ar.m that ne v.as 
concerned about the oossibility of enemy a<*ents confiscating some of the trnn.<s 
of Tesla and that apparently the Alien Property Custociari v*us ta/.inr some action in 
this matter. Inasmuch as tne matter was bein-; handled by tne Aider) Property / 

Custodian's office, the Bureau did not conduct any 


It is also noted that on Ju 


<sid not c,,iC H ct , t'-hiten’6S6 y ?-’--- 15 -£ 

uiy iv, ir. Ju-cr Sharpe of &e ioecial l.^r Pet id. es J - .! -.it" 

o..; *:• a letter r«po%V^ E H..:i*2ltjUt-»tS IS43 ch. 


ovemment in Exile ~ov one 



yicroRYj 



i.ils letter, v. acr- onar y e unst rtboo 
of a threatening .nature. 



f AiiuV/9 fy4j , 


) 

’ ; , COPIES DESTROYED 

148 OCT 26 I960 


a 


all ihforhatiom contained 

Esaas®? 1 ' 























Director, FBI 


3febrral Surcau of {uursttgatia 

itrtftrd §fatca JDrpnrfmcnt of dusitrc 

New York 7, New York 


n^yiciotnrj 

L . *,fTV 



Pear Sir: 


c* V 

w** •-». ■ *4-1 8-ift 

■9f \ A-GCJt/vvN. *t n.Qfp^O 

Re: UK*$f7,y S’TNPvTS; c*- ’ v 

SAVA v K0SANOVI CH J 

Experiments and research of NIKOLA/YESLA (deceased) 
SS FIONA OF - M 


Reference is made to the Bureau letter dated January 21, 1943, which 
bore a caution similiar to that mentioned above. 


The referenced letter dealt with the death, on January 7, 1943, of 
the famous inventor, NIKOLA TULA, who as well as being the inventor of 
Alternating Current, perfected many electrical devices. He is also credited 
with having dev'lon*d •h'- so called -Jldeafh rav* 1 which would safeguard any / 
countrv from attack bv air. / 

J 

o* June 9, 1945 , r? ??ew York City furnished 

inf r>m? tion of a nor. see cl fi c natvr^noTcaU^r th?t ft was his belief that 
oersens py^nathetic to Russia were makinr ar- effort t~> secure the effects of 


VTvny : 


vat ue 


claimed tnat h 


Accord in 
at V. r ri r v * 
endless 
explaine 
met ToSL 
sine? 19 
of anti— 
correct: 







'Letter, DIRECTOR, 
KY 65-12290, 




C.v r 17, 1945 


bIC 


gun. S PANEL offered financial aid to FITZGERALD and the two were in the 
c^scs^contact with each other for a considerable period of time. 

that FITZGERALD had lined up a deal for the purchase of 
^^^^^^^^^ne‘r. T ?«nFNGTON ARMS COMPANY. hut for some reason S PANEL blocked 
this deal by reaching top men in the^ftEKINGTON COMPANY. SJANEL is then 
reported as having obtained a- job for FITZGERALD with th§HTGGENS S^IP 
BUILDING COMPANY in New Orleans and negotiated a contract with FITZGERALD 
for the purchase and manufacture of the gun in a manner which would return 
802 of the profits derived to S PANEL, 

stated that in November of 1943, for some unknown reason 
but which he believes to be attributable to S PANEL, FITZGERALD was fired by 
the HIGGINS CFWPAKY. In September of 19V,, FITZGERALD was inducted into the 
Army and for a considerable period of time wa^lo^tg^a^an ordinance 
experimental station at Elgin Field, Florida. stated that at 

the Present time FITZGERALD is engaged in a hi^^^^e^^^ejqperiraental • 
project, at Wright Field in Dayton, Ohio. In spite of his rank of Private, 
FITZGERALD actually is the director of this research and is working with , 
many too young scientists who were inducted into Army from leading industrial 
posts. 

According to^mmU FTTZGERAJD is presently working on the 
perfection of TESLA ' S "daatl^ray^Vni ch in FITZGERALD’S opinion is the only 
Dossible defense against offensive use by another nation of ihe'Htomic Bomb. 

In this connection, it i^ noted that the^ew York Times^of September 22, 194< 
in an article entitled x^CiEi’CE IN TIT,' NEWS" by WILLIAM A<^t,AURSNCE, Science 
Editor states that TESTA, devulged to LAURENCE the fact that he had developed 
a "death rav" or force" which TESI.A claimed would melt airplane motors 

at a distance of 250 miles, so that actually an invisible Chinese Wall would 
be built around a country against attack by an enemy air force. 

According to the article in the^IMES, this electrical device would 
operate by the generation of power from a plant, a number of which might be 
located strategically along our coast lines anc the beam from which would 
melt any engine within a radius of 25C miles. 

[stated that during FITZGERALD’S acquaintance with 

S PANEL, FITZGERALD had told SPANEL of his associations with TESL A anc 
apparently described to SPANEL some of TESLA'S most secret work, 
believes that SPANEL, who he claims is definitely pro-Russian in attitude, 
is now atteraptinr through legal procedure to secure custody of TESLA’S 
effects which are now held by TESLA'S only heir, one SA?A KOSAKOVTCK, who 
is presently in Yugoslavia occupying seme governmental post. 

✓ It will be recalled that in an article published on March 15, 1945, 
by the*r T NG FEATURE SYNDICATE INCORPORATED, WFSTBROOK^EGLER charged S l 'AVEl 
with spreading oro- communist and pro- Russian propaganda through his full 
page advertisement in the newspapers, which SPANEL characterized as being 
published for the^NT r R’- : ATT ON AT. LATE'' ‘"'RPORATION, as a public service Mature. 
It is also interesting to observe tha* ir. the New York Times of October 2, 
1945, an article appears which states that SPANEL is suing the KING FEATURE 
SYP'TCATE T K C^RPORATED for six million dollars alleging the column by 
r '^5l.7F. to have been liibelous. 




i 


000002 





-1 




















Y ▼ 


-.'l/’tter, director, 
.65-12290 


er 17, 1945 


75 packing cases and trunks and are presently under seal by the New York 
State Department of Taxation. It was learned that the rental for this 
storage, which approximates *15 per month, is being paid by one CHARLOTTE 
^J<VZAR, 134 East 63rd Street, New York, New York, who is listed as the agent 
for SAVA KOSAKOVICH. 


Inquiry was also made at the office of the Alien Property Custodian 
in New York City, concerning an investigation conducted by this office at 
the time of TELIA ’S death, and at which time the letters property was placed 
under seal by the Ur. 4 ted States Government. ¥r. WALTER GORSUCH, Chief 

Investigator fcr th** Alien Property Custodian, provided a cover letter and., 

a summary of materials owned by TESLA at the time of his death which was 
examined by JOHN G.vfP-WP, of the office offSdENTIFIC RESEARCH <• PE’-ELOP- 
YEUT. Nr. 00RSUT also stated that his file in this matter reflected that 
on the night TESLA died his safe was forced open by a representative of the 
--SHORE & WALKER SAFE 'XTCPANY. It was Kr. GORSUCK’S belief that a Pr.^SWEEZEY 
who is believed to be one of the editors of the^O-ULAB S'dENCE YACAZIFE 'was 
present, in TESLA’S room shortly after the safe was opened. These individuals 
were WT LlSTEQElE, EDWARDN , AL‘’ER, and JOHN J.\hRBETT. ... 


There are enclosed herewith two typewritten copies of the report by 


Yr. . 

TR" ? o 


n f 


of the at; 


P7> ^ TMTL? Ty 


foil owing 


;US T TET^U reflecting the findings of Yr. 
cf TESLA’S effects. There is also enclosed 
list of persons associated w ith !. :T K OLA 
This latter item was furnished by* 


his examination 
herewith a uhotcstatic copy of a 
TESLA. 



bUC 


an: 


The above information 
r*o investigation is being 


is "a mi shed for the Bureaus information, 
conducted by this office. 



noi n 04 



Dear Sir* 

At jour request and that of Ur. Joseph T* King of the 
Washington office of the Alien Property Custodian, I hare ex- » 
sained the private papers, "writings, and other property of the 
late Dr* Nikola Tesla with the view to determining both their 
possible usefulness to this country in its war effort and the 
possible hasard attendant on their falling into unfriendly 
' hands* 


This examination was made at the Manhattan Warehouse, 

52nd Street, New York City, on January 26-27, and included all 
of the notes and material in Dr. Tesla's immediate possession 
at the tlm of his death and now in the custody of your office* 

For reasons indicated below, no investigation was mads of material 
. In trunks which had remained untouched in the basement of the 
New Yorker Hotel for ten years prior to Dr* Tesla's death* 





As a result of this examination, it is my considered 
opinion that there exiet among Dr* Tesla's papers and possessions 
no ^sclentiflc notes, descriptions of hitherto unrevealed methods 
“Ofaevices, or actual apparatus which could be of significant 


value to this country or which would constitute ahaaard in un- 
fr iendly hands i can therefore se ^nontechnical or military^ 
reaeon why further cue tody of the property should be retained* 


For your records, there has been removed to. your office 
a file of various written material by Dr* Tesla which covers 
typically and fairly completely the ideas with which he was eon 


earned during his later years* These documents are enumerated 
and briefly abstracted in the attachment to this letter* 


corns DKsraoxo 

148 OCT 26 196® 


00006% 





. .o 

J? su 


TO -2- January 30, 1943 


It should bo no discredit to this distinguished engineer and 
scientist 'whose solid. .contributions to the electrical art were 
Bade at the beginning of the present century to report that his 
thoughts and efforts during at least the past fifteen years were 
priaarily of a speculative, philosophical, and somewhat promo- 
tional character— often concerned with the production and wire- 
less transmission of power — but did not Include new sound, work- 
able principles or methods for realising such results* 

Very truly yours. 


JOHN 0. TRUMP, 
Technical Aide, 
Division 14, N1KC. 


Enclosure* 

J1T/G 



00000G 



I 




ABSTRACTS OF DR. NIKOLA TESLA'S WRITINGS 
RETAINED AS EXHIBITS 
FOR THE ALIM FROPERTI CUSTODIAN 


1 . * 

On January 26 and 27, 1943, an ax awl nation was wade of the 
technical papers of Dr* Nikola Tesla which, after his decease, had 
been stored in the Manhattan Warehouse in New Tork City* This ex- 
amination was made for the purpose of determining if any ideas of 
significant value in the present United States war effort could be 
found among his possessions* Participating in this examination were 
Mr. John C. Newington, New Xork Office of the Alien Property Custodian; 

Mr. Charles J. Hedetniemi, Washington Office of the Alien Property 
Custodian; Dr. John G. Trump, Office of Scientific Research and De- 
velopment, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts; Willis George, Office of Naval Intelligence, Third Naval Dis- 
trict; Edward Palmer, Chief Yeoman, USNR; John J. Corbett, Chief Yeo- 
man, USNR. 

2 * 

The following papers, which are regarded as typical of Nikola 
Tesla's writings and thoughts in the period of 1925 to 1942, were removed 
for the purpose of record and are listed below in the random order in 
which they were found, together with a brief individual abstract* 

Exhibit A 

• ^'Possibilities of Electrostatic Generators" „- an undated 
’ Article probably written about 1934 discussing the possibili- ' v." 

ties, as a source of high-voltage D-C power, of the Van de 
Graaff type of electrostatic belt generator. The article 
states correctly the electrostatic principles employed in this 
device and points out that such generators are not suitable 
for commercial high-pcwer applications, though of undoubted 
scientific value. Tesla's wireless tower, erected in 1902 on 
Long Island, is stated in this memorandum to have bean charged 
to 30 million volts. -* 

Exhibit B . . , . 

^Reactive Forces of Glycerine and Dynamite" - an undated 
memorandum Involving seme calculations of the explosive power 
of certain compounds and then deviating to a discussion of the 
possibility of transmitting power by mechanical vibrations 
along the earth's orust. 


000007 


a 


y 



Exhibit C 

« % . % . 

^Wprocesa of De-Qaseif ying . Refining, and Purifying Metals* 
a 41-page memorandum probably written about 1930 dealing with 
the above subject and proposing new theories of capillarity and 
surface tension. This correspondence Indicated that this had 
been submitted to various industrial companies.- 

Exhibit P •• . ■ T - 


ft 


"Reply to Amtorg re ♦the generation -of -high-volt age and the 
acceleration of charged particles* " - This document, dated No- 
vember 8, 1935, answers questions raised by Soviet engineers and 
scientists regarding Tesla's proposal of May 16, 1935. Treat 
this answer, it is deduced that the proposal concerned the gen- 
eration, of high voltages by electrostatic means. These means 
consisted of a high-voltage terminal presumably supported on an 
insulating column and charged by a gaseous charge conveying 
medium passing between ground and terminal. The ideas contained 
in this memorandum are fairly similar to th$ belt-cpnveyor 
electrostatic generator methods proposed byTVan deroraaff and 
do not appear to offer any unusual features) 


Exhibit g 

^ f*Art of Telegeodynamics , or\jDrt of Producing Terrestrial 
Motions at Distance" - This ’document , in the form of a letter 
dated 'June 12, 1940, to the Meetinghouse Electric & Manufacturing 
‘ Company, proposes a method for. the transmission of large amounts 
of power over vast distances by means of mechanical vibrations 
of the earth's crust. The source of power la a mechanical or 
electromechanical device bolted to some rocky protuberance and 
imparting power at a resonance frequency of the earth's crust. 

The proposed scheme appears to be completely visionary and un- 
workable. Meetinghouse's reply Indicates their polite rejection 
of this idea. • 


Exhibit T 


v^Ne 




v Jen Art of -Projecting Concentrated .Mon-Dispersive Energy 
through Natural -Media" - This undated document by Tesla describes 
an-el^ctrostatic method of producing very high voltages and ca- 
pable of very great power. This generator is used to accelerate 
charged particles, presumably electrons.* Such a beam of high- 
energy electrons passing through air is fie "concentrated non- 
dlepersive" means by which energy is transmitted through natural 
media. As a component of this apparatus there is described an 
open-ended vacuum tube within which the electrons are first ac- 
celerated. 


000008 




Exhibit F (cont*) 

The proposed scheme bears scsie relation to present -means 
for producing high-energy cathode rays by the cooperative use 
of a high-voltage electrostatic generator and an evacuated 
electron acceleration tube* It is veil known, however, that 
such devices, while of scientific and medical Interest, are 
incapable of the 'transmission ' of large amounts of power in 
■ non-dieperaed beams over long distances. . Tesla’s disclosures 
in this memorandum would not enable the construction of workable 
combinations of generator and tube even of limited power, though 
the general elements of such .a combination are succinctly de- 
scribed* 

Exhibit 0 

A circular by Caro^^ird, dated September 10, 1938, en- 
titled jrf*remendous New power Soon to Be Unleashed”. This de- 
scribes in popular style some biographical Information concern- 
ing Nikola Tesla and some ideas for the transmission of power 
on which he is stated to be working* It appears that the 
method of transmission is by the mechanical resonance method 
outlined in Exhibit F, above. 

Exhibit H 

This exhibit consists of a series of letters to represen- 
tatives of the British Government dated August 28, 1936; Octo- 
ber 26, 1937; December 15 , 1937; and April 5 , 1938* It includes 
a reply dated January 7, 1938, from the British Government* 

These letters offer to the British Government, for a fee, the 
disclosure of a means for accelerating to high energies minute 
particles* Such beams would constitute a death ray capable of 
the protection of Great Britain from air attack* 

The method proposed is essentially that described in Exhi- 
bit F above* Following the initial letter dated August 28, 

1936, the subsequent letters attempt to clear up the "misunder- 
standings” of the British representatives and to expedite their 
acceptance of the Tesla proposal. The British reply dated Janu- 
ary 7 is a polite expression of disinterest in the proposal* 

Exhibit I ”’ >• * , v. •• ‘ . ' V . 

An undated memorandum written after Tesla’s 79th birthday 
describing several discoveries which he believed he had made* 

The first related to a dynamic theory of gravity which is de- 
scribed ae not yet completed* The second stated as a physical 
truth the belief that "there is no energy in matter other than 
that received from the environment”* This second statement, 
which is discussed at length in this and other writings of Tesla, 
indicates his disbelief in the existence of atomic or nuclear 

energy. 000 U 03 


Rrhiblt .T 


Method of Producing Powerful Radiations 11 - an undated 
memoranduk in Tesla's handwriting describing "a new process of 
generating powerful rays or radiations** The memorandum reviews 
the works of I*nard and Crookes, describes Tesla f s work on the 
producaticn of high voltages, and finally in the last paragraph 
gives the only description of the invention contained in the 
memorandum. This description is as follows t "Briefly stated, 
my new simplified process of generating powerful rays consists 
in creating through the medium of a high-speed jet of suitable 
fluid a vacuous space around a terminal of a circuit and sup- 
plying the same with currents of the required tension and volume" 

Exhibit K 


A letter to prospective licensees on telegeodynamics dated 
December 27, 1941. This is a single-page letter with the type- 
written signature of Dr* Nikola Tesla, in which he addresses 
himself to the prospective licensees of telegeodynamics, states 
that over a half million dollars was spent on this development 
with funds contributed by the Morgans, Crawford, J. J.^stor, 
and Fish, as well, as commercial organizations, and states this 
to be a new art with which "unvelievable wonders can be achieved" 

Exhibit L 

Tesla* s %s_ System of Fluid Propulsion". This is an un- 
dated memorandum of about 20 typewritten pages describing a sys- 
tem of fluid propulsion in which the conversion from hydraulic 
to rotary mechnnical power is achieved by passing the fluid be- 
tween flat circular disks, shaft-mounted and enclosed in a cas- 
ing. 

This memorandum written about 1925 describes in general 
terms a kind of hydraulic turbine which seems practical. There 
-is copious evidence among the other of Tesla* s papers that this 
idea was generally disclosed to appropriate individuals and 
that it received favorable comment and possibly some use. Some 
of these comments are contained on the last page of the exhibit. 

Exhibit M 

• ‘ • '■ - ‘ ' 

"The- Power of the Future" - a memorandum apparently written 
by Tesla and probably in response to a request from some popular 
science group for an opinion as to the source of future power. 
This memorandum reviews the gradual evolution of power sources. 

It discusses in some detail the possibility of atomic power and 
states as his opinion that atomic power is not feasible. The 
discussion of atonic energy is apparently confused to some extent 


000010 



Exhibit M (cont.) 


•with planetary energy. The article further discusses the 
subject of wind, tides, lightning, and water power as a source 
of commercial energy. The last sentence of this memorandum 
states; "With my wireless system, it is practicable to trans- 
mit electrical energy at a distance of twelve thousand miles 
with a loss not exceeding 5 per cent. I can conceive of no 
advances which would be more desirable at this time and more 
beneficial to the further progress of mankind.” This memorandum 
constitutes an interesting generalized discussion of the various 
sources of power. It is qualitatively correct for the most 
part except probably in that portion which deals with atcmic 
power. 

Exhibit N 

”The Transmission of Electric Energy Without Wires” - an 
article by N.^esla in thc yElectric World . March 5, 1904, pages 
429-431. A general, somewhat biographical article on Tesla's 
early work with some speculation on the possibility of long- 
distance wireless transmission of large amounts of energy. 

Exhibit C 

/ ' 

-r w7[ or Id System of Tireless Transmission of Energy” - an 

article by N. Tesla in ^Telegraph and Telephone Age. October 16, 
1927, pages 457 and 460. An article which traces the early 
work on the production and transmission of electromagnetic ra- 
diations, describes Tesla's efforts to increase the amount of 
power which can he transmitted without wires and concludes 
with a proposed/"?? or Id System" for the wireless transmission 
of both power and communications. No workable disclosure of 
a means for accomplishing this is Included, and such generali- 
ties as suggest the approach which Tesla had in mind do not 
seem capable of accomplishing the desired result. 

Exhibit P 

■ illl ■ Hi- ■ 

"^interview with Dr. Nikola Tesla" by Alden Py^rnagnac 
for^opular Science Monthly, May 24, 1923. An 11-page memoran- 
dum written in popular conversational style describing an in- 
terview with Dr. Tesla and reporting his present work. This 
report includes statements on a new airplane, on rocket ships, 
on the wireless transmission of power, on a world system plan 
for the transmission of speech and television, on the imprac- 
ticability of harnessing atomic energy, on radio activity, and 
on the acceleration of charged particles, such as cathode rays, 
by high voltages. 


000011 



a 


o 


Exhibit Q 

JLn ^agreement dated April 20, 1935, between Nikola Tesla 
and the^mtorg Trading Corporation, in which Tesla agreed to 
supply plans, specifications, and complete information on' a 
method and apparatus for producing high voltages up to fifty 
million molts, for producing very small particles in a tube 
open to air, for' increasing the charge of the particles to 
the full voltage of the high potential terminal, and for pro- 
jecting the particles to distances of a hundred miles or more. 
The maximum speed of the particles was specified as not less 
than 350 miles per 'second* The receipt of $25,000 fee for 
this disclosure was acknowledged Jn this agreement, which was 
signed by Nikola Tesla and by A^Sartanian of the Amtorg Trad- 
ing Corporation* The method referred to in this agreement is 
apparently that described in Exhibit F, above. It is probable 
that Exhibit D, above, is an effort by Tesla to clear up the 
questions raised by Soviet engineers after the subject dis- 
closure had been made* There is no evidence that the inven- 
tions and information referred to in this agreement are other 
than those described in a number of Tesla's papers and pub- 
lished articles* It should therefore be expected, and it is 
substantiated by Exhibit D, that this disclosure subsequently 
proved unworkable* 

3* 

An examination of several items of scientific apparatus among 
the Teala efforts at the Manhattan Warehouse and in a deposit box at the 
Governor Clinton Hotel shewed those to be standard electrical measuring 
instruments in common use several decades ago* 


.JOHN 0. TRUMP, 
Technical Aide, 
Division 14, NURC. 


Mass* Inst* of Tech*, 
Cambridge, Mass*, 
January 30, 1943. 


JGT/0 



000012 




•-C 


LIST OF EERSONS ASSOCIATED WITH NIKOLA TESLA 



- Kerrigan, William - 89 Logan St., Brooklyn, N. Y. ' ^ • ' 

’ V Employed as building supt. Washington Market,. 'Brooklyn'. 

. Hr. Kerrigan was the messenger boy for Postal . - . 

Telegraph some years prior to Jan. 1943. At Hr. Tesla’s 
~ • . : _ request, he oontinued hie services as special . 

r messenger when convenient. He had called upon Tesla 

, - the week prior to his death and has much valuable data 

V- • and information concerning Tesla’s contacts. I first \ 

• — v ._ net Hr. Kerrigan at the Frank Campbell funeral churoh. 

•v’ ** Baumgarten, Clmrles - Room 1203, Huniclpal Bldg., Budget Bureau, N.y.C. 

•1. *. - Hr. Baumgarten was mot at the funeral and 

• ' : Hr. William Lawrence of the New York Times and tyself 

r ‘ had lunch with him. 'Hr. Baumgarten knew Tesla and ; ' 

.... his connections with the Queensboro Bridge and many of..^ 

^ his developments of Civic interest. v “ ;~ 

'Skerritt, Hiss Dorothy F. - Office, Biddle Purchasing Company, 107 Chambers : 
.• ... Street, N.Y.C. -Wo. 2-5500. 

_ .. Residence: Easbrook Heights, New Jersey 

^ . ' ' Hiss Skerritt was secretary to Doctor Tesla from 1912 

.until 1922. She is familiar with the karconi patent 
- * suit, many of Tesla’s scientific theories; knows the 

z names of some of his friends; has witnessed . . 

■e\.. ; . • demonstrations in his laboratory, then at 8 V*. 40th St. 

‘ . N.Y.C. Hiss Skerritt also knows that between 1916 

and 1918, Doctor Tesla was at the Bl&ckstone Hotel, 

: . Chioago and may have material there. She can give 

account of many of his deals with various firms. 

. .. Herrington, Harguerite - 46 W. 97th Street* N.Y.C. - Riverside 9-8186 

Hiss Herrington has known Doctor Tesla sinoe 1893 
and has been a guest of his on several occasions at 
the old Waldorf Hotel and at his laboratory in 1894 
on Houston Street. Hiss Herrington recalls the 
. • ~ lighting effeots without filaments ar.d his radio 

controlled boat demonstrations. She also recalls 
statements regarding communication without wires by 
means of a small instrument. She has witnessed many 
laboratory experiments including power transmission 
without wires over short distances in the laboratory 
\ > .. and also metallic plate suspension. He had also ; j... 

-i . -,y » *7- "talkad about ocpmunioation with mars to'her. • 

j • ' . V’ /- -V > 

riolSen, Mrs. AgnesT J -*32*7 E. 52 ‘St. N.Y.C. - Plaza 3-2341 

Hrs. Holden is the daughter of Robert U. Johnson 
(doceaeed) (1936) who was a close friend of Tesla 
for many years. Hrs. Holden first met Hr. Tesla / 
at her father's homo when she was about 12 years old. 

, The Johnsons were connected with the Century Magatine 

. * . which published many articles regarding Tesla. - , 

• Hr. Johnson wrote several poems about Tesla, one of 

. which appeared in the April, 1895 issue of the 






*?*'•*' h 


— Contury Magarlne and the others appeared in /__;—•/ 
. "Poems of 50 years, 1880-J930 by .* — ' 

2-^Eobert Underwood Johnson. Mrs. Holden has been—*. - 
/.... in close contact with doctor Tesla and has 
■' ;v witnessed many of his demonstrations including 
■ . that of the oscillator of 1899* She recalls, the v . 

‘ — near destruction of the laboratory. Since - ' 

—T "World II" , she has talked with b 0 otor Tesla — 

* with regard to instruments of war and he told - v" - 
.her in response to her inquiry regarding tanks 
recently that he could stop them or the war. — •- 

— ’ She recalls his discussions with her and her . / ' "* 

- 'father kogarding transmissions of power and ... 

.Kara, etc. She 6ays that she. knows that Tesla-'/ 
'•"/lias things for our Government only. Mrs. JJoldoii 
1 . ' witnessed many of the experiments and, was 

present at the .radio-controlled boat demonstration 
.'•“many years ago.’ . ./' * 


& 


Lbwenstein, Tritt (Doooased) Brother, Emil La* en stein - 182 Bennett Ave. . ' 

f.Y.C. - Wa-7-4519. Business (Artist) 420 
_ sxington Ave. N.Y.C. -Mu-5-8065. ’ y 

• / •' —.Kr..?ritt Lowenstein was the assistant to 

'•* *•. “ - “Dr. Tesla during Ms historic laboratory 

. experiments in Colorado Springs in 1899. He was 

*. ' also to have appeared as a defense witness 

yv * , . ... for Tesla in his Karconi patent suits during 

„ . y- :,'T. 1915, but for some reason failed to testify. 

..-.-The brother, &nil, address above, knows of the - 

• - ’ •* relatives of Mr. Fritr Lowenstein who have 

■- . dooumente pertaining to the 1808 experiments. 

• ' .;••. r (Kr. G.H. Clark provided information re 

. doouments and Lowenstein) (Mr. Crito mentioned 

- /• ' /Lowenstein). Mr. Hail Lowenstein is cot on 

. •. ^ friendly terns with the entire ’Lowenstein .family 

'and a Mr. Massey, 62 Vanderbilt Ave. can 
~ furnish additional information re Lowenstein. 

Shirk, A.J. - Inventor’s Model Shop, 70 West 100th St. N.Y.C. Ac-2-9466. 

’/* Mr. Shirk has met Tesla on 3 occasions and 

■ appears to know quite a bit about his model work 
and laboratory developments , particularly 
• . within recent years. His exact status can only 
..—be determined by another call or exaet-statve 
r; v x ' .“m interview. He is attempting to determine the 

VfldteB6 of A .WbSrXtofy that existed At about*/ 

O ' *** w: 57th and ‘fcrd Ave. and with whom a certain 

Dr. Walker was connected. 

Arbus, Muriel, Miss - Rest 600 V» . 13th St. Tell Vanderbilt 4-9816, 

Bust ffPB, Chanin Building, N.Y.C. 

Miss Arbus has several photographs of Tesla 

• _ and was a secretary to him before Miss Dorothy — 

— — . — iSkerritt, i.e. before 1912. She has not been ' TV 

■ : - "r .interviewed exoept by phone. 


1 


» m-' 


-3- 




w>, 


. - ; i . •" 


/Berg, Seigurd (or Sigaund) -"Copenhagen# Dsnmeirk* Bueineaai Paris, Franco ; r '~// 

'H# has not be#n' Interviewed. Seo Hr, fe.'. Fiona on 
_/ -// , - ‘ .. of the International Latex Corp., Dover, Del, . 

r * -;*• . ’ for information, to* Berg was a' close friend 

•*.//.' of Tesla in Europe and mentioned other members' l'' 
.. ... . J '._ ' ’ of his family! Mr. Ernest and Hr* Eako Berg. 

*’• /// / 'Y;. ■?./.. aro fo, .V®^ * n oorrospondenoo from Mrs. B*A* Hhrond 

. Ch> / • I :r ~ V **• to Mr.’ Kenneth Sweety in 1955 and 1934. /-“..-/ 

‘Behrend, Bernard, A* Lira. - Rond Point, *iken, S.C. phone 136. " - 

:>/ • Mr. Behrend and Mrs. Hoaviaido were very .close ~ 

•' ;,? v :V ' • . friends of Dr. Tesla.’ Mrs. .Behrend has many • '/V 

v .** n notes and teohnical data concerning Tesla's " : 

work either stored near Boston, Mass 'or at.: 
v / . .. ... _ ■; ; . Aiken, S.C. Mr. Behrend was Chief Englne'er :: r ~- / 

- - ’ - ’■ y~’ for Ti’estinghouse and supervised the .. 

--'/ ' / ./~- T - : * ' construction of a great number of Tesla’s * /-•'- 

. ‘/.'motors and generators. He is author of .• 

- : . •• "The Indust ion Kotor" pub* 1921‘in whioh a ’ \ ~ 

considerable portion is devoted to Tesla’s work. 

^ Boskan, Slavko, Mr* ' Engineer and author, Belgrade, Yugoslavia* -. ’ 

* ’’ /-..'■: «. - - *’. Mr. Bosk&n published a book in Dresden, ' . 

• ' • ./ J ’ ’ . Germany entitled ''Kikola und Ha Jerk" in 

1932 (Approx) Mr. Boskan was a olose friend of 
/Mr. Tesla and has considerable engineering • /■ 

* ... ' data in his possession aocording to Mr. Sweety*'. 




'•* . «r.- r ■ 

. a * 


Denton»Clifford, Mr. 


- Science Reporter.. flew York Daily News, -i - -; 

220 E. 42nd ^t. K.Y.C. Mu-2-1234 Ext. 657 '. 

Mr. Denton has been present at many of 
Dr. Tesla’s press roloases and has many notos 
regarding the conferences. Ho said that he 
gave most of his data to Mr. 7fm. Lawrence of 
the Mew York Times. - 


M 


Brown Brothers (hr. Arthur Brown) 220 Y/. 42 St. Bryant 9-4742. *\y.C# ' “ -V 

^rown brothers are photographers and have & 

. ; large number of photos of Tesla and hls^ 

- * laboratory equipment from which nay be 

deduced mechanical construction details# 

Curtis, Thomas Stanley - Address: unknown. Author ’'Experiments with . 

r ' t High Frequencies currents" „ - ^ 

f > ^ ^6 Jimportr^nt to v locatb h f r^ Cxirtis because' A ^. y ' ^ 

^ v .; - t w. ho discussed many of Tesla f 6 problems and > v * 

appears to have technical data regarding his 


work • 


* 


Cramps, Shipbuilding Co. 


Philadelphia, Pa# 

li!r# Crosby, former Sec « 


of Commerce, and 


hr. Cramps became interested in the radio . 
cdhtrolled boat of Dr. Tesla about 35 years 
ago. hegotiations were carried on between 

Dr. Tesla and the above executives# This... 
information was furnished by Kr. Kerr# : 1 





Clark, 



Crosbj T 

TTetcel 




K.- 3 


' 1 . jit . »>i * ** ^ 

It cay be 'well to' contact Ur* Crosby ft 
relatives *or Mr*. Cramps . •' * 


y' m 

‘ "i v 


*/ ' 

.Julius 

iJtv , .- 


* >*,' 


r m ■•* Tr 


. A 

-'*1 . 


•>. a* 


- ,4629 193rd St. Pl.ushing, tong Island. Tell Flushing 7-4711.” , 
Ur. Ceito was mentioned to ine first by ' - .. t T 
Mr. Eosenovioh and later Mr. Spanel had 
'received his name from Mr. Wm. Lawrence. 

Mr. Ceito is machines t by trade and j*'; ... vV;-_ 
worked for Dr. Tesla as such from 1916 to '*/ • 
1929. %e was particularly concerned with 
the construction of .a turbin, and a fountain 
. developed for a Mr. Hatmaker. Amon£ other 
things, he. worked on an extractor for /,‘g; 
sulpher from sea water arid mechanical '*• 

;.iV ’ v. ; ' ’ ; - , jievlce for measuring the resistance of a * 

• •* • ball bearing. He has little data left .of 

' . •• ~ ,v.;. Dr. Tesla* s' work but has a very good •' 

..-'-.j;- 'i : Z. ' .memory. He mentioned the Boston gear 

• 'if works, Mr. Bradley, Mr. Miller, the j- > ** 

Zurab ach Machinery Co. and Mr. Barney Levi. 

•/;'-*/ 1 _ Mr. Ctito’s father also worked for — 

.... — V ‘ Dr* Tesla in 1894 atad was with him at his ~ 

‘ ^ Houston St. laboratory. Mr. Crito, Sr. 

: » aooempanied Dr. Tesla to Colorado Springs 

LV-.' •" : " in 1899. Mr. 'Ceito has a very good memory 

7 * ' and oan furnish additional information." 

;; r- ' ~JJe has discovered a photograph showing all ‘ 

*•" ’ _y,‘ of the employees of the old Tesla laboratory. 

. * " ;r ,. ..■’*• He worked for Dr. Tesla on the development 
of a speedometer for the Waltham Hatch Co. 

(This information from interview). 

Mr. Geo.. H. - Resi 349 E.,49th St. “Tel'i El-5-1603. Eusi RCA ~fg. Co. 

• , ’ (Library) 25 Beaver. $t. N.Y.C. Room 314 A, 

..*"**• ; > Tel* Hanover 2-1829. Ext 123. ----- 

'i ■ " M r . c.S. Clark was contacted by virtue of a 

> *■-. .tY .call placed in December to Mr. Orah.Dunlap 

of the RCA Corp. Mr. c l"ark has a very 
• . large collection of personal data pertaining 

to radio pioneers, particularly Marconi* 

- " ' His business has been to collect such data 

- . . , in order to assist the prosecution of a suit ; 

of infrigment against the Marconi patents. 

' - E®,^§-£ never m-ot Dr. Tesla, but. he knows of. 

* hts Wo/J^’and^ ig 'iriteresteH "in collecting 

” historical data for preservation. Mr/ Clark 
is a friend of i-r. Sweery. 


;> 


-v*>- 


Former Sec. of Commerce, Washington, D. c«(eddress unknown) 

See Cramps and Kerr 

Tailors - 2 E. 44th ‘'t. Murry Kill 2-6757. " K.Y.C. 

This firm was tailor for Dr. Tesla * 

.— ‘ throughout most of his life and may have 

information with regard to his friends, ", 
not otherwise li 6 ted. 




' -5- 


■ ' -t* 


* 


French, Shriner, and Urner- Shoo Shops. 250 Hadison Ave. Hurry Rill 2-0319. - - 
• ... • K.Y.C. V.’ . • - 

. ' ;■ v '' •- . . Dr. Tesla purchased most all of his shoes free 

*• •'.* ” ■'* ^ this firm for the past 50 years and data may be - ' 

\ \ r \ ' ' gatherer frer. their records such as calling '- » ‘ 

‘ ? /"^'Lddrosses, etc. • . * . ' ,-y ^ 




, Cornels* Fredrick C. F.3.I. Office Federal Court House Bldg. 12th Floor? 

• . ...?•• ; .>«. - - .;. Fegent 2-2315 *'/ ' r 

' :* . ' Ifr. Cornels was '.informed of the possible value 

"■ ’ i ‘‘* of Dr. Tesla’s data immediately ' following his 

',C .IT' <£;. . • " ' death. So far as .known, no action*was taken. .. 


•••'**/ "Commercial photostat Company* 11th Floor, Woolworth 51dg. K.Y.C. -m- 

• ' * • - Firm which made photostats of Tesla patents* for 

’ Kerr. - 

•£' .. i • •- • •" . - - 

*- Crane. , £rnest R. to, contaot call Hr. Clark of FCA. 

*wi • : ^ •” .' Hr.. Cram knows a great deal about Dr. Tesla’s 

' ’ relations with the RCA Company. Hr. Crama* > 

• " - .was a former employee of. RCA. • 

^ ‘ 

Gilder,' Kodr.an - 108 E. 82nd St. K.Y.C. Butterfield e-7397. 

..vZT'--v. v ': * ‘ ' . ■_ Son of Richard Watson Slider, former Pub. 'of 

; : .-* "*• Century Hagarine. Hr. Gilder knows of eccio ‘ . 

old Tesla manuscripts and what has happened to 
>\ his files of the Century' Hagasine at its 

dissolution. Thi6 name was received frere^ -* 

. ^ Herrington. ' :: - 






. . . r-«.~ * ’ 

Denmark, Lt. 




1270 6th Ave. Rooi? 811, Cirole 6-1464 (restricted number) 

• K.Y.C. U.S. Army Xnt. G2. 

-'.5/. ' Lt. Denmark and hi6 superiors were notified 

by lir. Spanel and Washington with regard to - 
. Tesla devices. Lt. Denmark was interviewed . 

> y- . ' ' t personally with & group of 4 other officers 

r - including Hr. P.itchen. ' * *' ■ 

■ - : f.- . - i; . ' 

Kirsch, Leon - a former draftsman for Tesla - name from hiss Dorothy Skerritt. 
, i ; This party should be located because he had a 

lot of confidential datk of Tesla’6 and made 
many drawings according to Hiss Skerritt. 

.g-r '»- ■ , r .*••• * -"?■ - X 

' -DreWs. Lillian ..xHarf led to. an Austrian ^by ^iame of. DePree about 1914. ♦ r / • 

'• 4 '* ‘Hiss' "Drews Vas'tecVetary'tio Dr. ‘Tesla prior.' -A-' 
’. ’5*^ • to . 1912. Her ^preser.i address is' unknown and * 

she was not in good favor with !)r. Tesla, 
according to Hiss Skerritt, the informant. 



Dospassos, John - Attorney, and very good friend of Dr. Tesla. Address unknown. 

... .,U Wanted Tesla to 6top the Spanish American War. 

* '* Formerly lived in Kew York. The .'Gentleman was 

'■ expensively dressed and wore frocked coat 

■ _ ^®imil 6r to Tesla with bright checkered vest. 


t u. 


r - 

_ _• • --*3 

T- '*-■ ■». . •*.« 







; -Jb — 

-•--“te. 


7 *77 "2 . ct. 
. -Fv~:u • • .:,* 

+ -• -L. -4. At ■*■• * — •* - • 




• ~ v. ' % Ipt" 

rm^'rv- 




Ir: t. ■ - J t51 


>. : i- V 
*»• -.- * 

*-7 -t 


7* V. .- ~ Ead office in vicinity of 200 Broadway r*s '" i; * 

..- - ‘ late as 1520. Hr* Do6Passos~is believed to777. 7r71 

7-' ‘**7-. .-. . ' r ' ,7*. *"* . have engineering data of Tesla’s according.- ^ • v 
.-;*’* •>. •** 77 • to Thonac Byrne. . _7» » ' 'V.7'£-7':|7-' ? ’ ? ? 

•V -• -- * ■• . ^-^ *‘ -t - r ;. '.T'* ; ;jjjjfc ' '■*■-. ' 

DeForrest, pr. 'Leo- 6190 Hollywood Dlvd. Los Ai^^^Hs, Calif • - r .’ -* r ^-r7 v - l ._ 

• _r- : *. "... ../Dr. DeForrest is |Hp. alive and was a 

’■a.. -^friend of Dr._TesI^in the late 90 and • •■' 

V- -777 ^-V "' ** * 7 ‘-‘.Tsarly ISOO’s. There is a possibility ~ 

: 7.jr */ ‘.7 .'-i-' : ' 7 ’ '’' vTjfchat. Jhe'aay. .be.” able to assist in inter- -v ' J7 V ' 

~ .-‘v '. .,£».* *■ . . : u»- »■- ■ • - _ C "7 preting Teela’6 works* ' .u-J •". " r :? v - ; 

. ^r.^Oubilier, 'William 7.’ president of Cornell Du^ilier Co*7 VaWacturers of ^ v 

- * ; :' »• _CCondens6rs. Kr.. G.E, Clark Informs • ‘rz~ : ’■ 

.* cr "; - ... that Vr. tkibilier ,ha6.in his possession ' - ^ : ' ; 

. *. . 'some of the original, notes of the 1699 : ' - 

- ' " .•" ;7Jaxperiff.ent«’'’in' Colorado 'springs. •• 

Fradenburg* i.B,» A reporter for .the^Brooklyn Eogle during 1920 who had 
*-■'■*- v "7..’r.Iy/' c - r i- - -r'. ,insnerous contacts with Tesla with regard - 
' -.77::-^ - * jto Power Transmission. His' present .address 

rV • *;ie unknown.^but hie formerly resided in *' 

• '77 ?. = 7- V Brooklyn unfil 1934. ^ ...' “.'T 

Fittgerald, Vrahcis , A. - Hlagara power Commission, Buffalo, K. Y. " 
t ..7.7-^' . . Mr# Fitrgerald, according to a personal r 

• . * . .T -t interview with Dr, . Tesla, was a^friend 

, 7 ,. ,<u - of his jjn the A.C. power proposition for 

•' . -V . '■-•' * .. the 'development of Niagara. He also told r \ 

.. V- 7 * .7®® 1Sr * Fittgerald. attempted to ••• . 

; 1- *' - influence the Canadian Power Coranission 1C 

. - 1 *. .... • .. ‘ 




. v-r'y ^ - 


*> ; -t: 


- V>^' 


^.1927 for a project to transmit power without 
is 'a 

r ‘ have some data. 


'wires. There i‘s a possibility that he may 


*-r V 


X. 


«* 4 • * . V 


Gerneback, Hugo p Publisher, Besi 230 Vest End ‘Ave. sohliler 4-2130 ^ , 

■*• 7 .* - ' ' Buax 26 W. Broadway, : Teli Elector 2-9690. *7 ^"V- 

^ ’ . < A TViend or . tesla for. about 36 years. " 

.7 . ... Published many articles about Tesla during. 

•7' 191S in the "Klectrioal Experimenter and 

. ‘ later in Science and Invention.” Has many ^ 

7 • • 7 . r of Tesla’s original manusoripts and photos, *■- * 

Believes in all of Tesla’s theories and has v ‘ 

.'T 7 ¥ ‘ a working knowledge^of then.* This party ‘ 

V*'« V Vi .gk Z^*s s ': * ' • ; • :^‘^ a 8 rV 00 >t a ? t «d 'Several it^eks $rior 1 6 # ;VlN 
- ■ Dr.^Tes^la’s dej^th. Ur* Gernsback attempted' \ 

to assist Dr, Tesla personally and appealed 
io Vestinghouse for funds in 1933. 


v 


a - 


Hammond, John Hayes, Jr, 


Gloche6ter, ifass. Tel. 2080 - 

* Jfr. Hanmond, Sr»» financed seme of 


~?K' •**•.'* ■ ■'* 


Vr. Tesla’s. boat experiments and only. .10 . 

years ago John Kayes Hammond, Jr,' operated 
one of Tesla’s original models. The 
family has one of the boats in thei7 . 7t" *7 * 

.^^77' 777 -77‘* *-.* • 7vf s *7; 7 : f\ -/ 



•*. » ^ .- --*v -» .'- • * y .. - - * ,-» 


* be gathered from this souroe. 

.«• -r~ • * .. . •••' 

• ■•■«.;* • *.r- - .7 * 

Island .v. ^ . "’■••r. 

Gyroscope Company# » . 
employee Number 6470# '" 
*5400 (Restricted number) 
-- x ^.Xxt., 211. Use any New £ork Phone. .Kama : 
c -. if^fron Csito. This party knows of Tesla’s 
; laboratory on Long IslAnd/through the - 
" latindry driver named Toiacy'Wallen. 


~-r ~ r *- ;?v <r 


j- ~~ 


obbe# Octavloua - Springfield ’gardens /^ong Inland*. 

'• (3a 8 not l>een oontacted) 


. 4 




..-.V- . r, ;^y 




financed fountain built by dtlto. 
hot been oontaoted# but he lived In the 
Regis Hotel in .1920. ' ' * • : 


^fc^ ^-^atmalcer# (no initials) party who 

”*&***■ •' • '•'■'*■-■*:. ■•;:v?‘C*S't. 

. - . ... 

. .;j gos onovl ch j STava - Navarro Hotel# apt. 17B. 112 Central park south# N.'Y.C. 

- • • * '* ^ Tell Clrole 7-7900# Office- Regent 7-4662. ; '. .-V:-* 

..• . « - '*• . - i. .V'v ^President of the Central Eurooean Powers ' “ r ' 


• ^ ■ ** • * • . . * 






/ SA VA 


•7 


v * «'-> 


ftti K«rr^"5ohf- Attorney, 253 


‘President of the Central European Powers 
■^Association and former kinietwr of Yugoslavia 
.to the U.S. Mr.K. i6 one of the two living 
'.nephews of Dr. Nikola Tesla (see Nikola Trbjevich) 
lir. K. Iras present in the Hotel New Yorker , 
on .the morning following Dr. Tesla’s death. V •- ■ 

Others,.present were K.U. Sweety# G.H. Clark. : 

Mr. JC.* knows of many blue prints' that were 
,e in the 'rooms and a black notebook with 
several hundred' pages containing the last 
notes of Dr. Tesla. Ur. K. says that 6ome ...- 
'of the papers were marked "Government" and 
that Dr. Tesla had told him he had valuable 
‘ information. Mr.* K. ie of the opinion that • 
it may have been for the Yugoslav Gov’t. -.*• 

He says that no will was found. His attorney 
is Ur. Wittenberg. He was appointed heir 
by the Surrogates Court .of New York County. 

He said that the other nephew waived any v, 
interest. Ur. K. is not in aocord with 
Ur. Fotich# present Ambassador of Yugloslavia 
to U.S., now in Washington. There is a bit 


of political unrest in the JJfqgoslav organisation. 

• ' v .V *r. *• v 

iBroadway# tf’.l’.C. Cooper Kerr' punhan (att. at>ww.) - * 


Courtland 7-9334 - also associated by Byrna. 
This firm was the patent attorney for 112 of 
the Tesla patents. They al 60 instituted the 
proceedings of the infringement 6uits for the 
h Westinghouse Company. Hr. *Wr knew Tesla 
' very. well and can give considerable data. 

Hr. Cooper# now deceased#' was however# the ' y. 
main instigator of the patents for Tesla. ' 
^Ur. Cooper left this firm some time ago 'end £ r dv ; 
Tesla apparently took some of his business'” 







**** . 


C'Vt'. . w.;;,?. - void patents of Tesla In his own handwriting .. ....-- 

> V,;,; -' *7jire' available at this office. k r. Byn» 

: ; I;_. .has additional information. I an of the/V>*./^ 

'•v V4r^i . V Opinion that this firm still ha* a connection , vrr**' 




with Westinghouse. 


•• 'tr V--»? / jfcV' 


.'.■"fj.v . . *7-r ‘ " 7 * . . . • ..*. •• .. 

..... ~ “ v \" Byirne# Thomas# J works for Cooper Kerr ’and punhaa (see John lerr a 
/v> .* -v-V- ■■/•• _ ... -V ..'Mr* Byrne knew .Tesla' wary well. and also knows 

' v- * r ** ’ ... ' ; of the o'onneotiona with the Union Sulpher* ; . 

i*f- .•i*'.'* ‘ Cofopnay and v the "turbine for which .see b*itq."n: : -^ >.v 

There is a wealth of information in the -** . .Lv 

. .. •’ - 

-W • . 

of Power Transmission and any patents on .'. ?> 

. “?^-'\f ile which were never issued. Kr. Kerr and ‘ V." 

iir. Byrne were contacted before Hr. Tesla’s - T? ,.-~ 


r 


t ,• *2. ' offioe of this oompany regarding the system 

‘ ' 'rj:2vr £ -.■ '• / ’ • ^ \ . * * - * ■ ;* ot 


- '<t''5 v ' *•' ^ *. _ -y. ■ 

— 5 * *Jr - 

rs:-- ^ / . V- • • . 

• ■ •> - > . _r? — - . * - 

* v* ^V. 

1 >T -/ ------ 


death. 




• w"> 


J’^ostiqh (first name unknown) Hew York# Off ioial' photographer for "the 
- ’• _ : Yugoslav group. 'Office believed to be 

JJ 35 E, 72nd St.' and .Residence in Long Island. / 

'■ City. He may b^ jreaohed through Regent %4662. 

. He is a friend of Hr. Kosonovich. * r v. 


& e V ’ 

* \~ *r... * t 

- r^ . . e. S .V • 


Kuliehich# Prof. Koeta 

••• • 


Rest Belgrad, Yugislovia at the Tesla Institute.. v- 
v .Ee was a school mate/ of Tesla in Grots. See / 
the H.Y. Sun of August 27, 1931# . — ^ } 


V -if ^ 


'jpage# JB. G. Ill Nassau St. N. Y. C. Engineer# workd for Leon Ottingejy. .*■* / 

•• '.'■jj? "-•/* ’jit-'* Courtland 7-6500. . _• - ' 

•y.*r* ■ v* I..';' - He was a friend of hr. J.S. Leach (deceased) - ^ . 

- 2 ?j=. ... V .. 'fonrerly of Redbank, K. Y. who made electrical ;; ‘ — r* 

~ ... /parts for Tesla’s laboratory. He says that 

'• ,j. 'yf-;* *. ..' .. ..'’he can get informktion regarding Leach’s 

„i ’ . ’ . - •• ’*• ” " _ relatives and perhaps drawings. * /•"'* 


.-**■* _ ^ f* 

''*-■/ ♦. Levi# Bernard - Haohinest# 2umbach Machinery Co. 134 H. 54 St. N.Y/C. 

' 5 .; Circle 7-1444 •, ’ /** 0;^ 

_ - ^vt •« ,.*v Pflcpivrtt? this fr^m Tr.<fn wVin A that 


Received this name from Ctito who 6 aid that . 
Levi knew of other* work by rcachir.est 6 on 
Tesla's equipment. 




messenger. He has cot been located. 

lynch# Arthur. Lived in England’. Relieved to be near London,’ noi* deceased.' 

Family had considerable correspondence with . - 

. .. Tesla regarding transmission of power. without 

r .V'-*. wires. . -V V t/r .. 

Lawrence# William. Science Writer# Ker; . ■*ork Times. 229 W. 43 St.’K'.Y.C. 

, - Lackawanna y4-lCCO. Res: 541 E. 72nd St. - i/;:. 

z li s ^ -Vr- ' ' /*' . . Rhinelander 4-5538. ' : • L - , . 

•-* ■: ' • • i. v --?«3'-vw5w' ... > v ■ v.. . . w • . v.r. r-r»r N - . *: r .^ » 




y’l&r' -Tifc. •' 

"V- ■-•'•? « 2S' . *;v - ■ r** ’ h * 

... ,«•* • • '>s\* > t^r. -^r^.. T^ '-V- ^ * ■ -.■ . ~ .1 

i - ^ * -:£& i' * 


- ~'rr£r.% 




~r?- . 


Has .-r t 


; *jO -“ 


*-*-*'■ 


: *:-v» •-- 

^vV , -w;.;.. .«r 

.. .. . V JP-* v- 

•'•*j - # ‘- • . ■-*-*? •* . - ..< 


A. friend of Tesla's for about 25 years 
‘ /, much old data regarding Tesla and has talked ••;V ' 

;*£‘ to tin on many ocoasions regarding power V- ,v.- 

. .transmission and the war effort* Has Assisted 

greatly. in prodding information for gathering . ^. r 
.' ♦;■ material* eto*' This party was contacted . 

before Dr- Tesla* s death. / : . - -//if’’ - vt> 

T'.v" ,.r-\ *■: ••• . :■:, .-.-.L- •' 


-'^•• v Jessie, M.C . 52 Vanderbilt ATS* ?i.Y.C. ' - . v ‘ . / 

.VfcV : * i- -.'■ '*'v; ' {'•*■ ; ‘"ft : £.:> -, 

. - > .*wX- ^ ijf*— ‘. . . > j*. **. * , • •*-■*' " .* *»* “• ,J > . . .. _^ r 

JKai eT . Ruth H. The Yugo Slow Society* 565 6 th Ave. Hoon~867. fl-8-0256 j*’’ 

'•♦’v ^'-. v • „./••' .• 'This is the inf onnation' center and serves ’jas 
'!*>. *■/■*' ’ ’.•• r t-'-'-Vbe publicity' agent for the group. *<• .T •?>!' >« . 


' : - -• . 


Kies E. Oppa also works there and has many 
/.‘names of Tesla's friends, j ; - -* 


' _ Martin, Octavo. Daployee of Hotel New Yorker and frlend 'of Tesla. ' 

" -- .'■••• ; : ■'*•■ .•*•-• - -• * .-.vrV ^ ‘ 

‘ . ^ ’ r^* : ‘ • •*- • *- ; T ** . - ‘ ■ .{ - r 

r^'Jkkthewe. Grenville (deceased) wife was Gana Walker* Ket. Star sponsored - 

’?«^36r ■'< .. by McCormick. The 'family lived in England 

i-Ct‘ ‘ -* • • .. ... ' . r - -' until his eath and his wife now resides in ../-.-/ \ T" 


V. 




New York. ^Kr. Katthews was refered to in 
Tesla's articles for the Telephone and Telegraph 
Age for Oct. 1927. Mr. Matthews had correspond 
“~dence with Te 6 la on the so-called "Death-Ray". -• 

..Gana talker has all pf her husband.' s' data. ... ^ * 

a. ! i ■ - \'X » • (i.fOlf.'TivniVt 1'^ v .> *s>^- i * — '-t *" 

- f 


S" Mott* ^.Jordan* Jr. 620 ,90th ^t. K.Y.C. Bus: 6 E. 45th St." 

;:'.V Jell Vanderbilt 6-0345. ' < 4 .'*:--. 

. .The Mott family financed Tesla in various •/.' . 


ventures. They may have some of this data. 7 

' ■“ V : V- "■ f 

^Gossett* W* 0.. Ford Kyseim* Detroit* Mich. ■ . • --•• 

’ - ''s' *";v- :* . / //; Mr. C 0S8e tt is associated with a Mr. Blaok 


- ■* . . :r * ^; 

V fc ‘ r v 

‘•WtAJ 


?r-'/ * 




./ while he 16 on leave, of absence to the Ansy. 

‘ Mr. 0 lack may be reached regarding some models 
. "of Taslft'# which are understood to be on 

display at the Ford Museun. / » i' 


> Nathan* Thoma* A* 25 E* 83rd St. N.Y.C. 

- v ' .. • : T-'e do not know what connection this party had .. 

d ~ V* r 'l ,'■* ' • :1 ‘with. Tesla but his h«Be was $eoured.. '*?'•••-• . > 

•* *' O'Neill* John*" J. ‘ Res: ,209 N. LongBeach’Ave.. Fred))ort**tong ‘Island. 

• ..J- Tel* Freeport 2-493. ■ 

/"• 7 ^r. . .-" ■_ Soienoe editor of the New ^ork Herald Tribune, 

’ . ‘‘230 W. 41 St.* N.Y.C. Pennsylvania 6-4000. 

i ' . Mr . O'Neill has known Dr. Tesla for 40 years. 




<v ; . ■ 


r . Be has hrid many discussions with him regarding ’ ^ . 
‘ C/. ills equipment and. soientific ventures,. He" .? . 
,.rj . * .interested Dr. Tesla in 1934 and .1935 to ;,i . 
‘/'present the’ matter of national protection 


- r. .. ' '‘devices to the H*S. Covt#- Mr. O'Neill made - 

f -c.% % t ~ j; ^ * ;v^* . r . • - -i •• ^ ^ .. . S’ .* ,nr V* 

*” -1. < *7’^ : »-.■ ... c.- wr* 1 ;^T ‘ 'J 






* > r ** r 

- - - “.'•.«* . ^-’ *- '^.. — -\— • " t \y .~'7 ^ ^ - -'~ 

,T:- ^ V. '" *^» few Contacts and the. natter was dropped. •’.'' 

- . Mr. O'Keill has notes of 1938 and 1939 wherein <- 

■ y JDr« Tesla declared he had been Approached " 

-V v ->r^ 1 - . .. .; *' - \* the Br itlsh Govt, through Stanley Baldwin and . 

Keville Checerlain to negotiate for one 'of bja 
devices. Mr. O'Neill thought that the simi^V- v ' y 
_ offered was for 30 millions of dollars. v In the . 'T. 
'll interview, ; Dr. Tesla stated that his device '^ ..-- I 

• - *- . vi_ 'would operate over arrange of 200-250 miles. y. ' r-:.' 

^ 'Mr. O'Neill la of the opinion that Teal* >d 

ll^lixl l f *v v .' tousual powers. Mr. Lawrence is. of the opinion 

^ that he .£oes not know what he is talking about.' r.~ 


**V 


; ■ i . -*<r^ ■ tr-;~ 


■ 

"* T-’. 


'1. 


- -■*. 

■r*, . 

~' V 4* * ^ 


-at- •< 



.'system and. has correspondence with Tesla c . 

V concerning "wave propagation". This information • 

' should be valuable. . . . . • 5 v,i • , * *V , • 

, ■ -*&, ■•■-»'•"• - '■■■*•' . - -«• A •*.’ -si " *•- • •• •— - — . 

“barony ^^Inc.^photographers* 362 fit n Ave. N.Y.C. V»is 74713 y-. 

- ••..'/ ' C - They have photos of the old Te6la Laboratory end 

y • ■ " ' ’“pictures of Tesla to 1914. . ’ 

;i^..'T I Vage,' Parker w. Attorney ,* present address unknown, however he resided In 
. '^>v.:r . v Jtanhattan for about 40 years andVres formerly 

.V ^ /^associated with Cooper Kerr and Durham.' He . - * \z . 

' *was last known ^|o be associated with an T 


Xzty&y.”'' ■.*' 

. . V**i « '*'* v . ** . j* ’ 

y . ?jr.. . - _'*.V 


attorney by the name of Bean in Manhattan. Be 
^ worked out many of Tesla's details concerning 
Power Transmission and Tesla gave him many 
notes according to Mr. Kerr. » ; 


'Badosavijevioh, Paul, H» New York University, Professor, Education Dept. 

' Tel* Spring 7- 2000. "v*" : : 

A friend of Tesla for 35 years and knows'muoh 
.. of his work with regard to the retina and bile 
ohemistry. .. 

7; Kitchen, (first name unknown) Anti-Trust Division, Custodian of Alien 

Property, 16th Floor, 120 Broadway, N.Y.C. • 

•Pegent 2-3582 (restricted number). Mr. Bitahett''- .v* d 
~ .agents who feri'* 

^responsible' for .the sealing of the* property In , 

^ the Manhattan warehouse and various hotels. On j 

‘Saturday eve., January 10, 1943. This office *- 
worked with Lt. Denmark. i 





T *e* 

> •: -- •;.* - 

' **> iC -*- '•'♦-•-> *.'• • •: -'a ■- •• - v 

•A ^“ l J^ 6 a °or, Eirty« Island Bead# Ramsey# H^ 4 J« B«s< 






■> J - 


-U- .■;. . '■-••• *"• • - 

Business t lfodel Craftsman r:. 
Publication. Ramsey# lew Jersey, Telt Rsmeey 619* r> r ;| 
: . j. ; This party knew Dr* Tesla very well and Z 1 1. - v v v' 

•: .* .i'''.* '.talked* to him. several .weeks prior to Tesla's 

>.*•.• * death. He has sons plus of Tesla equipment."' *»: .jf 

e ® ty , Jb ane th # # H . 163 Hilton St. Brooklyn; H. T. Evergreen 9-6B09 • *»% ‘ 

Hr.Sweesy "has known pr.' tesla for approximately 
Mi'- '■-•■’*•> »•;-* ••';•.*•.■'■' . ... .. / " -IB years. He beoatte'a"olose confident of his AL 

vf' non many things anddida verynotable work in 

1936 when he arranged for a collection of 100 . _ . 
letters fr<xa' various scientific authorities 
eonseaorating Tesla's 76th birthday. Hr. Sweety 
wrote many articles about Dr. Tesla and has - *i.r 
some old clippings and miscellaneous data „ 
Including several books detailing Tesla's work. .y 
w_ Sweety corresponded with Hr. Boskan and - 
Behrand*' ~ He is a friend of Hr. Clark. . 

..Hr* Sweety would like to write a book of 
S : : '* an<J had spoken to with Dr. Tesla 

regarding it. .1 oontaeted Hr. Sweety several 
weeks before Dr. Tesla's death. (Huch 
^formation oan be obtaiited here). 


<3^4. va . - a ^T. f. - tr r* 

'2fv* ■ 




. - . V-S *- - 

' a?^i 


Instructor of Electrical Engineering, Yale 
Univers lty , "Few Haven# Conn. 



years beoause Prof. Seott could not understand 
In full# all of Tesla's work. Kore 
information can be obtained here.' 


** *~7‘ • v v j ‘*&r+~ * 

\ ‘ T?’ ■••--“J- ' 

i K , . • ... •• _ informat i 

"V- ' .i ..i” ■ 

'A . . $ohefff#'.6ebnge# Hra.' 219 Grant Terrace, 'Haroneok# Hi ,Y. • £ 

Hrs. Scherff was the auditor for Tesla for 
many years and has muoh information to give. 
She has information concerning Tesla's personal 
things and technical data and oan provide 
muoh of value# including old documents. 

■ IZjr'S- 3 ‘ ,* ' 

_ iIL'Za.---*. '-'it ■ 




- -U- * ■ « . 

*4 * * % v t 






CC-247 


June 8, 1949 
MEMORANDUM FOR HR. 




_ WHITSON r 

0 ^ 

HE: SAva N. BOsANOYIC 

YUGOSLAV AMBASSADOR TC TriB US 
INTERNAL SECURITY - R 
(Bureau file 65-47953) 

AIL INFORMATION CONTAIK© 

This memorandum ie submitted to incorporate all the pert inen 
references in the Bureau files concerning tne entitled individual who is 
tne Yugoslav Ambassador to tne United States. 


Mr. 

Tolson 

Mr. 

Cleee 

Mr. 

Glavin 

Mr. 

Ladd 

Mr. 

Ni chol 8 

Mr. 

Rosen 

Mr. 

Tracy 

Mr. 

Egan 

Mr. 

Gurnea 

Mr. 

Harbo 

Mr. 

Mohr 

Mr. 

Pennington 

Mr. 

Quinn Tamm_ 

Mr. 

Nease 

Min 

Gandy 





biv-^ 


A case was opened on this individual when information was 
received that Hosanovic had taken possession of the scientific papers 
'of his uncle, Hlkol^Tesia , tne internationally known inventor. Subsequent 
investigation determined that Kosanovic had turned over the possession of 
these scientific papers to the Alien Enemy Custodian in New York City. 

(65-47953-X1 & Serial 3 & 4) 

oava ii. kosanovic was interviewed in either April or Kay, 1948, for 
the purpose of ascertaining whether or not the Serbian National Federation should 
be required to register under tne Foreign Agents Registration Act. 

> * (97-1340-17«, pg.5) _ 

Pertinent information concerning this individual has been properly 
forwarded to the State Department by separate letters. 

Tne main file on Rosanovic contains only two reports, one of which 
was sent to the Attorney General by letter dated December 13, 1943, (otner 
report not pertinent). Tnis case is currently in a pending status. j } 


A t/ 


C. J. Myrtle 




V; 





\ 






cc - Mr. Laaa 
cc - Mr. Fletcher ■ ‘ 

cc - Whitson 
cc - Kr-rvifoTtle 

CJK: jpa - . THIS MEMORANDUM IUTOR ^TOTTKISTRwWET’URPeefiS 

TO BE~©ESTRO¥^) AFTER ‘ACTTON* TU'TATCEN"AND-440 , F"-8ENT- TQ^FILES 




cl ^ 



Office Memo "<mdum 


UNITED S'; TES GOVERNMENT 


TO 


FROM 


SUBJECT: 


The Director 


D. 




Ladd 

o 

PA7A N. KOSANOVIC 

i:tari:ai. eecubity - yu 

Bureau File 65-47953 


DATE: April 


ALL IKFUHXATI03 CONTAINED 
HEREIN IS UNCLASSIFIED --.-T 
DATE <L1£j£ 2L h l'J/te& t' c trf 




F.eference is made to my memorandum dated -larch 29, 1950, 
relating to telephone inquiry fcy the Yugoslav Ambassador Sava 
N. Kosanovic as to the possibility of obtaining a cony of a micro- 
film cony of the technical papers of the«CLate Ilikola^Tesla, world- 
famous scientist who died in New York in 1943. 


/v. 


Kosanovic claims to have been a nephew of Tesla and. is 
known to have tried to obtain these papers at the time of Tesla's 
death. However, they were taken over at that tine by the Alien 
Property Custodian. If any copies were rade of these papers, they 
were made fcy the Office of the Alien Property Custodian which tool: 
possession of Tesla's papers in 1943 or the Department of the Array 
which was interested in copying Tesla's notes in 1945* The Array's 
^interest apparently was developed by a young scientist named, “loyce 
^itsgeraK* whc had been a protege of Tesla and one of ' is few 




F-itigerald, who knew thrt Tesla had been endeavoring 


ccr.: j 

to n'-rfocv t ’■ i vire.lc.rr transmission cf electrical current, one of 
t: basic concepts involved in the production of ?. "Death hey" 
h.cd subsequently entered the Arm;'", and in October, 1945, appeared 
st our Few York Office, together with three other members of the 
United States Army, to request our assistance ir. obtaining access 
to Tesla's paper? which were stored in a warehouse of the Ilanhettan 
Storage Company. Fitzgerald and his associates were referred, at 
that time, to the Alien Property Custodian T hich was reported to 
have made an investigation of Tesla ' s belongings following the 
letter's death. 

Although the Office of Alien Property or the Department 
of the '.my might be able to furnish a copy of Tesla's papers to 
.Kosanovic, it is not believed that the i'BI should facilitate his 
search for this material, which alth.our! possibly of r.o present 
v lue from a rational Defense standpoint, could still conceivably 
be of assistance to the Yugoslav Government. 

copies destroyed 

OCT 2G I960 . ^ . 



Trmey 


Twl*. Roo« 


0an4y_ 


1 


«‘ * " 



KBCCT •; SEDATIONS : 

1. Th :: t the attached letter explaining that v;e have never 
had such c copy as he requests, be sent to Yr. Kos novic* 

2. Thrt the attached meno to the Ner: York Office, instructing 
them tc make further inquiry at the Manhattan Storage Company and 
advising that firm that we have no co: y of Tesla 1 s papers as they 
allegedly claim, be forvrarded. 



dfr- 



trr*OAra> PORM NO. 64 


Office. Memorandum • united states government 


Director, FBI 
SAC, New York 
6 

SAVA N. KOSANOVIC 
INTERNAL SECUhITY-YU 
(Bufile 65-47953) 


Eebulet dated April 3 last. 


date: April 17, 1950 


;,l l INFORMATION CONTAINED 
HEREIN IS UNCLASSIFJEpn 
DATE^J^— 




On April 7, 1950 agents of this office interviewed Ur. J.V. POTS, \ 
7ice President of the Manhattan Warehouse and Storage Company, 52nd Street x 
it 7th Avenue, New York City, and at that time Ut. POTTS advised that the 
rules of his firm required that all persons gaining access to goods stored 
by Manhattan first had to fill out an appropriate form setting forth their 
names, date of visit, and reason for requesting access to the goods. 

In a. review of the file pertaining to the storage of the effects of 
NDOJj^SSlA, UR. PO^TS revealed that only one such visit had been made by 
persons outside of the management of Manhattan Storage itself. This one 
occasion took place on January 26 and 27, 1943# at which time representatives 
of the Alien Property Custodian made a thorough review of the entire effects 
of the TESLA estate. 

The TESLA effects are stored in rooms 5J and 5L of Manhattan Storage's 
warehouse at 52nd Street & 7th Avenue, New York Qity. MR. MICHAEL KING, who 
stated he had been Floor Supervisor for approximsifely 10 years on the floor 
in question, stated that he could recall only 4^^ one occasion in early 1943 
when an examination was made of the TESLA effects. He stated that at that 
time numerous photographs were taken by the examiners. His description of 
the equipment used would tend to show that a microfilm reproduction was made 
of some of the papers of the deceased scientist, -IfU KING added that several 
of the group making the examination wore U.S., Navy uniforms, and during the 
two days required to complete the examination the civilian assistants in the 
group were identified to him only as "FEDERAL AUTHORITIES". According to HFi. 
KING, no other instance of microfilming of the records of the TESLA estate has 
taken place since that time. 

It should be noted that the Bureau was informed of the examination men- 
tioned above by New York letteiy^with attachments) dated October 17, 1945> 
entitled 'iNKNOKK SUBJECT; SAVA^ffcSANOVICH; Experiments L Research of NIKOLA 
TESLA (Deceased), Espionage-™. 


cc: 65-12290 


&-C0aaoo3fc f 

INDEXED - 38 APR 18 1950 
37 


EH&J.JC- 

icfe f -139i r " d [ 


; A/j v 


fe Vj 

C A. 

c A, 



c 


Letter to Director, FBI 
NY 105-1391 


MR. POTTS stated that no inquiry had been received by Manhattan fron 
SAVA N. IDSANOVICH, nor had Manhattan informed him, in any way, that an ex- 
amination of the TESLA effects had been made by anyone. In fact, added MR. 
POTTS, the only correspondence relating to the TESLA estate has been in the 
form of bills for storage. 

MR. POTTS stated that any personal inquires regarding the estate would 
of necessity be directed to him, and to date no such inquiries have been made. 

Interviewing agents explained to POTTS that the examination made, 
as mentioned above, was not instigated by the Bureau, nor had the Bureau taken 
part in that examination. 

Unless advised to the contrary, this investigation is being placed in 
a closed status, and no further investigative action is contemplated by this 
office. CIPSED. 


\ 


- 2 - 
























^p 






OPTIONAL. FORM NO, IO 
JULY I §73 KOmOf* 

«y FFMR Ut CTftl 101.11,# 


* f 


TO 


FROM 


UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 

DIRECTOR, FBI 
SAC, BUFFALO 


i' 

\4 


subject: 

n 




date: 8/20/76. 


^confJ ^i 



NTIAL 




Re Buffalo airtel to Bureau, dated 7/13/76. 


y Enclosed for the Bureau are six (6) copies of an 

A LHM, captioned ’’NIKOLA TESLA MONUMENT, NIAGARA FALLS, NEW w 
' YORK," Which is self-explanatory. One copy iSj .being y 

designated for Legat, Ottavra for information, _£Ewo copies 
are being furnished to New York, one to Newarkfor information 
since they had previous interest in this matter, and one copy 
to WFO for information because/ of U, S.,and Yugoslav 
dignitaries who attended the unveiling^of the monument. 


/ 


W-- 


Nothing adverse came to ^.the attention of this 
office concernine the dedication of the Nikola Tesla 





— Monument x^hich was a bicentennial gift from the Yugoslav 

Government to the United State^. Diplomatic representatives 
• from the United States, Yugoslavia and Canada reportedly 
attended the affair. No further inquiries being made at 
: ■ ' Buffalo and it is closing its case administratively. LI 

.. > 

: 


• r 


CLASSIFIED^/ 6166 
EXEMPT F$0M&D37"CATEG0RY 


DATE 0; 



i)- Bureau 
.(iir Le 


5SIFICATI0N I 



bl 

*[<$ 


1 - Newar 

2 - New, 

1 - WFO 
1 - Buf 



'l'] 

- , 7 AUG 2^ 1976 ! 

-I • _ An* z.xisxmt 

,Tnfo) (Enc.l) (RM) 

P(Encs. 2) (RM) n :wcu 

1) (Info) (RM) 


SBS:mraw 

(8) 



J 






Copy 

ty 

K Inf, 

date 

/ 





trlO 19 7 §uy US. Savings Bonds Regularly on she Payroll Savings Plan 


i 



In Reply, Please Refer to 
No No. 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
Buffalo, New York 
August 20, 1976 


NIKQ1APESLA- 

MONUMEgT/ 

NISGARA FALLS. NEW YORK — 



An article appeared in the "Buffalo Evening News," 
a daily newspaper published in Buffalo, New York, on July 24, 
1976, which in part contained the following information: 

The article was captioned "Dignitaries Unveil 
Statue of 'Genius' Tesla." 

The article contained information that NIKOLA 
TESLA was the inventor of the alternating current and the 
first man to successfully transmit electric power. The 
background of TESLA set out in the article revealed that he 
arrived in New York City in 1884 with four cents in his 
pocket and plans for an airplane and a book of poetry. 

In 1888, he invented a system to make the transmission of 
alternating current practical, at 37 was a millionaire 
but died at the age of 88 in New York City alone and 
penniless. 


Av T - ' •* 


The statue, approximately nine feet high, was 
erected on Goat Island, a site which is located on the 
property of the New York State Park and Recreation Department. 


The article revealed that more than a thousand 
people listened to FRANK G. ZARB, Federal Energy Administration, 
representing President FORD, and Dr. IVO MARGAN, President of 
the Socialist Union of Croatia, representing Yugoslavian 
President TITO, as both pulled the cord unveiling the nine 
foot high statue of TESLA. 





A 


NIKOLA TESLA 
MONUMENT 

NIAGARA FALLS , NEW YORK 


The sculpture was created by Yugoslavian FRANO 
KRSINIC and was the bicentennial gift of the Yugoslavian 
people to the United States. Both of the above men read 
official greetings from their presidents and exchanged 
pledges to continue good will and friendship between the 
two countries. 



The article, stated that following the unveiling, 
a reception- luncheon was held for several hundred persons 
at the Parkway- Ramada Inn, Niagara Falls, New York. Mr. 
ZARB toasted the Yugoslavian delegation which was answered 
by that country's Ambassador to the United States, DIMCE 
BELOVSKI . 


According to the article, there was a bit of 
diplomatic byplay between Mr. ZARB and Ambassador 
BELOVSKI during the ceremonies. In his remarks at the 
statue unveiling, Mr. ZARB included an appeal to Yugoslavia 
to stop all harassment of Americans visiting that country. 

In responding to Mr. ZARB's toast at the luncheon, 
the Ambassador gave assurance that his country wants American 
visitors and will welcome them. 

According to the article, some observers thought 
that the Yugoslav release of an American held for the past 
seven months was timed to coincide with the unveiling of the 
statue . 

The tribute to TESLA was sponsored by several 
Yugoslavian groups in cooperation with the Niagara Mohawk 
Power Corporation, Westinghouse, and the New York State 
Park and Recreation Commission. 

An article appearing in the "Niagara Falls Gazette, 
a daily newspaper published in Niagara Falls, New York, 
captioned "Zarb Calls for Energy Independence for U. S." 
the article dealt with the unveiling of the Nikola Tesla 
Monument and stated that accompanying the Yugoslavian 
Ambassador to the ceremonies on July 23, 1976, were Dr. 

PAVLE SAVIC, President of the Academy of Science of Serbia, 



/ 


. ! 


NIKOLA TESLA 
MONUMENT 

NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK 


and VASA VESKOVIC, Yugoslavian Consulate General in New 
York City. 

An article appeared in the "Niagara Gazette" on 
July 24, 1976, captioned "Aide Almost Missed Event." The 
article in part indicated that friendship and cooperation 
between the United States and Yugoslavia was the theme of 
the day as that nation dedicated a statue of NIKOLA TESLA 
on July 23, 1976. 

The friendship was personalized when a Yugoslavian 
tried to cross the border from Canada to the United States 
to attend the dedication without a visa. 

The individual was GOJKO SEKULOVSKI, who was in 
Montreal, Quebec, Canada, as the Chairman of the Olympic 
Commission of Yugoslavia. He also happens to be the 
Assistant Secretary. of State for Foreign Affairs in that 
country. 

He did not have an American visa and almost 
missed the unveiling of the statue. 

Fast thinking on the part of representatives of 
the Niagara Frontier State Park and Recreation Commission 
sent an official car to take the dignitary across the 
border, which saved the day. 

In the "Niagara Falls Gazette" on July 24, 1976, 
there appeared an article concerning the unveiling of the 
statue which indicated that Dr. BOGDAN MAGLICH was Chairman 
of the Yugoslavian- American Bicentennial Committee and was 
a speaker at the affair. Dr. MAGLICH also serves as 
President of the Fusion Energy Corporation, Princeton, 

New Jersey. Dr. MAGLICH eulogized the inventor TESLA 
and stated "only America could have taken a giant of Tesla's 
stature., embraced him and provided him the means he needed 
to bring his talent to its best use of humanity." 





I 


nr 

) 


NIKOLA TESLA 
MONUMENT 

NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK 


Established sources, whcr have furnished reliable 
information in the past and were in a position to observe 
the commemoration of the Tesla Monument, stated that no 
adverse information came to their attention concerning the 
dedication of the statue on July 23, 1976. 











iam, 


*• 




SAC, Chic ago rO-OO-lBljOf) 


TUQ03LAV OONSUL Ate GENERAL 
INTERNAL. SECURITI - TU i 


CAQO , 


ILLINOIS 


February 19, 1953 \ 


REGISTERED MAIL 



Attached is the translation which you requested by letter 
dated January 22, 1953. 

I The contents thereof, where pertinent, must he reported 

' under appropriate captions and afforded whatever investigative 
' attention ^is necessary. 


(rj - Disposition of the foreign language material submitted in 

i ~ this connection is set forth below: 

* . XI 


Returned herewith. 




-t 


\ 

Enclo£jure 


yW'i MOspab 




TkAHIB s ^ ^ ^ V 

FEB cT’f ^2|HR24 1963 





- 



declassified I 




Item No. Is 


Yl- * ?T r /v 7pp> %f j ~ RBO— C TIO A TIO VO JJ C' 7: ;• 


r> ■ 

v/ 

This announcement by the American Yugoslav Co~nittee .invites 

all Americans of Jugoslav descent in the Chicago area to attend a com- 
memoration affair to be held at Kordovan Hall, 1502 South Racine Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois, on November 16, 1952, at 3 P.l'., in observance of 
the 9th anniversary of the founding of the Yugoslav Republic. Representa- 
tives of the FPHY, continues the announcement j will spea ; at this affair. 
The Tamburica orchestra "Jadran" (Adriatic) will furnish the music and 
the Slovene Singing Society "France Presereri" will appear cn the program. 


The following paragraph in the announcement appears in bold 

face type: 


"It isAour desire to have the friendship between our new 
homeland and our' homeland - Yugoslavia - deepened and strengthened still 
more, because this will be to the benefit of the peoples of both 
countries. It is our duty as Americans of Yugoslav descent to help 
as much as we can in this sense. Our celebration of the Day of the 
Republic i3 dedicated precisely to this end." 


A'» 


item No. 



GERTRUDE RAJACIC, secretar. 

^tG- ores 'dent. 





This mutilated Tetter is datelined Chicago, December 10> 
1952, and i3 addressed by Consul YOZE MO RAVE C to the Slovene Emigra- 
tion Society (Slovensko Tseljenisk" fa tic a) in Ljubljana, Slovenia, 
and reads in substance as follows: 


MORAVEC advise#' that he was on a visit to Cleveland several 
weeks ago and that on this occasion he spoke to several members cf 
the Central Committee for a Slovene Concert Tour^ fSlcvene Octet ). 
Although the preparatory work is going along fine, continues V0RA7FC, 
there are certain difficulties stemming from the (Slovene Emigration) 
Society which directly hamper this word: and which can easily bring 
about the failure cf the octet ©r even bring into question the octet's 
arrival in the U3. Most of the difficulties MORAVEC attributes to a 
lack of ’understand! ng on the part of the above-named Slovene Society 
of the "American situation." 


"In the first place," nays MORAVEC, "it is necessary to 
emphasize that this tour by the octet IS NOT being organized by SAL'S, 
but rather by the Central Committee in Cleveland, which is a completely 
separate' body from 3 A No and works independently, fids comri ttee ir 
neutral; it belongs to no poll tied movement and an attempt has bren 


TRANSLATED RY: 

VI Ki 0L7T CSxoab 
February 5, 1953 




r 




b7C 


J 

iti r 


but rnunt ra, er return then; and consequently -he entire proce lure, 
from the local people’ s committee right up the Wirdstry of Interior, 
has to he repeated. In the reports concerning the Consular .Service 
we constantly made reference to this problem and begged the Kinistry 
of Interior to verify the accuracy of documents (at least the crude 
errors which anyone can detect)j the situation has now improved some- 
what, but the problem of slowness still remains in sending documents 
so that in urgent cases we are forced to expedite the matter by tele- 
gram. 



fe. U. Apropos* the conve 

the proposal to the Personnel S 
asking for authorisation to hi 
clerk at the Consulate (she was 
cone from Hercegovina 

position she ea 

can be authorlsed^^tarti^e sail 
( approaching 



•tion with the ambassador we sent 
tio^o^^^^finiatry of Interior 
a second female 
oHn^tn^uI^^while her parents 
is ncjw visiting her present 

month for a $-day week^consequently, she 
ary of at least this much. Before 
talked to five other female clerks - 


some .because they earned store money in their present positions than 
we can give them, sane for other reasons, turned down the offer. 

The present female clerk we shall be able to release only after 
another one is hired and broken In and after we find another female 
clerk to replace the present one. We remind yon that 

had less work in past years and ye^had^j^addition 

stil^anott»e^mal^clo^^^cT~nr •' during 

wasflH||HHHflp' 

The problem of purchasing a house for the Consulate 

c • • . from before, .e are now paying 
' n ' _:2Q0 for the residence 
which means J 7200 a year 



l&OO a month for the Consulate 
f YC 


f the Consul General, a total 
e took an interest invarious 


) 


■vu ses 


which were for sale and ascertained that for $50? to 380,000. wmld,, re 

a building for the Chancery, th$ residence of the Consul General 
and one or two small rooms in a4dition. If the offer for purchasing 
a house were to be accepted, we 'would forward concrete proposals for 
your consideration. We remind you that the present premises of the 
Consulate are small (we need least one more room) and conseouently 
this too would be settled by the purchase of a house/ 

Item No. 12: ^ 

A routine memo concerning the personal correspondents of 
the late jlTKOl. TESLA. and the possibility of purchasing the same from 
unidentified owner (name illegible). There is also a notation to the 
effect that"" " PAL AND ACT C h as only receipts of the money whi ch he sent 
TESLA as aid/ J // 




T° 


Item No. 13* 


The first page. of item no. 
render intelligible translation. 


- 7 - 


13 is insufficiently legible to 


I 






) 







c- 


Thl« will acknowledge your letter of Jtme 9th. 


t*- «nv,o_*ir C ? I * 0aS0 *° in< J ulr y' «*» papers of 

n? i ^ ^ J*Ci f Sl a _ were l«9»unaed# after his death, by the 
°^*- ce Property of the Department of Justice. 

\J * 

— Sincerely yours. ^ i 

A M Kelley ' ^ ^ 

Clarence K. Kelley 
Director 



—The Doputy u^nm a y f!nnnr ^? i - Snnlotn i ra 
■ Attention * — S usan H.- Haupoift EC 22 


iio 3 - O'O 

Dr. Tesla was a /y \S 

a+* 4-Vio f ima V» 4 <r* 


‘t , 

NOTE: Bufile 100-2237 indicates that 

world famous electrical inventor, and at the time of his 
death his personal papers and effects were impounded by 
Office of Alien Property for national security reasons. 

Since Tesla* s death in 1943 the Bureau has received numerous 
inquiries about the disposition oflihis technic al pa pers. 

The above reply is forwarded in answer to these inquiries. 
Bufiles contain no information identifiable wi^h j^qu^st^s. 



j mailed 7 

1 JUL7 1975 


'-FBI 


•X'J 


J- 



- / 


f!k' 

\ 

/ 

C<-< v vv 

OPO r-i. T.r 






the INSTITUTE OF 
ELECTRICAL AND 
ELECTRONICS 
* ENGINEERS, INC. 

ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT SOCIETY 
Z't 




Sit* SOUR® 


Directory Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Washington, D.C. 20535 




lease address reply to 



Dear Sir, 


%<ea<-6# A*# 6 ** 


As a member of the IEEE I receive and read a considerable volume 
of Institute material* The current issue of our Engineering Management 
Society Newsletter carries^ airfeprint of an article fran another society 
newsletter entitled: " Nikola jEeala :-Th e Greatest Inventor of all Time?". 
In my opinion (having some knowledge of electrical engineer ingTiia toFy J 
it is overly lauditory, but worse than that it implies suppression of 
his electro-technical work by our government. 


The third from last paragraph states: "At his death, in 1943, what 
papers he did have were confiscated by the FBI. These papers remain 
sealed from the general public to this date. Their contents are totally 
unknown, nor has it been revealed whether the U.S. Government has made 
use of them." 

Personally, I do not believe this and I would like to refute the 
statement. Please let me know whether the statement is true and if so 
what disposition has been made of the papers. The quotation does not 
say what type /fiySSs^ere confiscated. I am not concerned here with his 
ideological views (I don’t know what they were), only with those relat- 
ing to electricity. 



Thank you. 






1 1383 



July 25, 1983 


! 

l&WSIDE S0U5CS 



Your June 27th letter to the FBI requesting 
information concerning Dr. Nikola Tesla was referred to roe 
for reply. 


Exoc AO Adm. 
Exec AD Inv. . 
Exec AO LES 
Asst. Dir.: 
Adm. Servs. 
Crim. Inv. „ 

Ident. 

Insp. 


On January 26 and 27, 1943, Federal authorities made 
a thorough review of the effects of Dr. Tesla to determine 
if any ideas of significant value to the United States war 
effort could be found. His effects were examined at the Man- 
hattan Warehouse and Storage Company at 52nd and 7th Avenue, 
New York, New York, where they apparently were taken after 
his death. Participating in this examination were represent- 
atives from the New York and Washington Offices of the Alien 
Property Custodian, the Office of Scientific Research and 
Development at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the 
Office of Naval Intelligence, and United States Naval Research. 
The FBI did not participate 


name red opinion' of a spokesman of 


It was the cons-raered opinion' of a spokesman of those 
examiners "that there exist among Dr. Tesla's papers and posses- 
sions no scientific notes, descriptions of hitherto unrevealed 
methods or devices, or actual apparatus which could be of 
significant value to this country or which would constitute 
a hazard in unfriendly hands." There was thought to tm~ i iro“' 
technical or military reason why further custody of the property 
should be retained, and in February, 1943, the paper sCSppareritiy 

were released to Mr. Sava N. Kosanovic, Dr. Tesla's nephew and. _ 

— the administrator of his estate. Mr. Kosanovic's addr« r S7f' atT - 
that time was 112 Central Park South, New York, New York. 


BHM:kmf 


(4) 


liitell. . 
Lob. 


Logoi Com. 
Off. Cong'T 
Public Affo. 
Roc* Mgn*. . 
Tech. Sorvo 
Training 


ggrftlJG 1 1 1S8 j 


\ 




To la phono Rm. 

Director* i Soc'jr 


I 

MAIL ROOM E3 


•/ -H ,* 


. ...... 2 */-« 


■'T - 1 * 


Our files do not reveal any pertinent information 
on the Tesla materials since the 1940s, and their current 
whereabouts or condition is unknown. 


Sincerely, 


i 

> ! 



Roger S. Young 

Assistant Director in Charge 
Office of Congressional 
and Public Affairs 


1 - Mr. 


Enclosure 


NOTE: Reply discussed with^^Hjj^^^^^FOIPA, RMD, who has 

handled similar requests for^^Tform^^on in our files concerning 
Dr. Tesla. In numerous previous responses, we have said that 
the Office of Alien Property of the Department of Justice 
impounded Dr. Tesla's papers after his death. However, the 
Office of Foreign Litigation, Civil Division, indicated that 
Dr. Tesla's papers are not in their possession and may, in 
fact, have been turned over to Tesla's nephew and the adminis- 
trator of his estate, Sava N. Kosanovic, in February, 1943 . 


2 









Published monthly by Tho H. W. Wilton Company 
950 University Avenue |s| tw 


Crfifor: IWclr 


*••••«>»« Mt", f. M«ry Tr*» 


m~i r , 'i ,iw <*«»•**•« <-«. «* pwbu> 

pf0rU»4 Wu« credit i* f I vm tl CUIIINT HOOIA^NY 


February 1943 


Explanations a 


Amhontit* for form* of name* are the Library of Congress and 
the Wilson Company bibliographical indexes. Exception is made to the 
authorized form when the shortened form of a name is better known: 
e.g., Monty Woolley instead of Edgar Montillion Woolley. If the full 
name is not given in the heading it will be found in the sketch itself. 

After the name, pronunciation is given if the name is difficult, and 
then we date of birth as fully as possible. The date of death is given for 
'1;°“ " h ° h , av * The occupation of the subject follows. Next comes 
t ic sketch itself, followed by a list of references for further study. These 
include magazine and newspaper references (in one alphabet) and books, 
n the person is not living, references are made to obituaries in news- 
papers and magazines. Only books of an autobiographical or biographical 

Si. UrC r^r C » , . ncIud, ng such well known reference works as Who's 
Who, Who s Who tn America , etc. 

form^LTf^jp ^ icl ? n ?*i Under »rc in abbreviated 

, ; °7? h f Periodical and Newspaper Abbreviations” for complete 
mie). Ihe form of entry is as follows: Sat Eve Post 56:78-9 S *39 por. 
this means that an article supplementing our sketch will be found in 
numh?r y volume ». P*Bes 78-9, in the September 1939 

r, '’JJ* abbreviation for means that the article is accompanied 

1 L h ! Case of news Papers, the name of the paper is fol- 
lowed by paging and date. 

When a name in a sketch is followed by *“ a biography of that person 

£nrt£ 1940 t C !r r Hi B'OMhy Yearbook published £ De- 

V^^kLl 94 ?' f ... ' Ume followed ^ “ **e the 1941 Current Biography 
Yarbook. for a name see index in the December 1942 Current Biog- 

*k. v!r t °f ra . PhS . n0t c f e<,,,ed ‘n various studios and not obtained from 












(I 


fi 

-I 

,.*i 

p 

ij 

ij 

4 « 

f 

r 


! 


i 

i 

} 


54 CURRENT 


SMITH, IDA B, WISE-Confmuerf 

References 

Christian-Evangelist p423-4 Ap 16 *42 
por 

Lit Digest 121 :33 Je 13 *36 por 

N Y Times IV p2 Af 31 *41 por 

Newsweek 16:40 Af 19 *40 nor 

Time 29:55 Mr 1 *37 por; 39:51 Mr 2 
*42 por; 39:12 Je 15*42 

Who’s Who in America 1942-43 

v^STAUSS. EMIL GEORG^VON (shtous 
' fon) Oct. 6. 1877 — Dec.( ?) * 1942 German 
state councilor and a Vice-President of the 
Reichstag; former director of the Deutsche 
Bank in charge of its oil interests. 

Obituary 

N Y Times pl7 D 12 *42 

-AvKES, CHARLES H(ENRY) Nov. 12. 
' 1882-Dec. 19. 1942 Nationally known as Ok 
newspaper cartoonist, •‘Bill**’ Sykes; drew 
famous war cartoons for the First and Second 
World Wars ; editorial cartoonist of the 
Evening Public Ledger of Philadelphia from 
. its founding in 1914 until its suspension in 
January 1942. 

Obituary 

N Y Times p44 D 20 '42 

-YjTESLA, NIKOLA (tesla) July 9. 1856— 
Jan. 7, 1943 One of the world’s greatest 
electrical inventors and designers; American 
citizen of Greek origin; worked with Edison; 
credited with many “epic making" inventions 
since he came to the United States in 1884; 
in his old age claimed to have invented a 
> “death beam” powerful enough to destroy 
10,000 airplanes at a distance of 250 miles and 
to annihilate an army of 1,000,000 soldiers 
instantaneously. 

Obituary 

N Y Times pl9 Ja 8 *43 por 

^TTINNEY, CAL(VIN L.) Feb. 2, 1908- 
Radio commentator 

Address', b. c/o Mutual Broadcasting System, 
1440 Broadway, New York Gty 
Since August 1941 Cal Tinney’s slow Texas 
drawl and homespun humor, with intimate, 
folksy interpolations, have been heard over 
the Mutual network in Siring up the News 
each Monday and Wednesday evening from 
8:00 to 8:15 p. m. Tinney s colloquialisms, 
which the folks "back home" chuckle over — 
his “just -bet ween-you-and-mc, ain’t it the 
truth?” "it shore is" method— has captured 
many a listener bored with the formal, polished, 
or cut and dried comments of other news- 
casters. 

But there has been more to Tinney titan 
his mannerisms. Speaking usually as a repre- 
sentative of what the "common man” thinks 
about affairs at home and abroad, he has taken 
more than one direct and shrewd pot shot, 
left of center, at stuffed shirt policy, the doings 


IOGRAFHY 


of Big Business, politicians who coddle Fascism 
at the expense of democracy under high-sound- 
ing tenns of Americanism, etc It is not 
surprising that the sandy-haired young man 
from the West has occasionally found him- 
self in hot water. Objections have at times 
been made to the FCC on the "character of 
the broadcaster’s utterances.” But Tinney has 
apparently survived the allegations against him. 
Since he currently continues his bi-weekly 
talks. 

The outspoken homespun philosopher, who 
has become a kind of Will Rogers columnist 
of the air, was bom February 2, 1908 on 
a ranch in Pontotoc County, Oklalioma. His 
family, however originally came from Texas, 
where his grandfather, a rugged individualist, 
had strange politics for those parts. "My 
grandfather was a Texas Republican," Tinney 
says sadly, "and they shot him. Seems he 
exploited his sentiments one Saturday night 
in a bar room. Ever since then my Pop has 
been a Democrat" So has the son and, judging 
by his broadcasts, a fervent New Deal-support- 
ing one 

After attending the Oklahoma public schools 
Tinney enrolled at the Murray State School 
of Agriculture in Tishomingo, Oklahoma. 
There, however, his education lasted only two 
weeks. ”1 never did stay there long enough 
to find out whether it was a high school or 
college,” he says. Young Tinney apparently 
decided he could get a better schooling by 
traveling and seeing the world at first hand. 
For some years he tramped around, often as 
an ordinary seaman aboard freighters off for 
foreign ports. He was a newspaperman of 
sorts, also, and found jobs in Shanghai and 
Paris. His work in the pre-War French 
capital was rewriting material found in English- 
printed newspapers. “It was easy,” Tinney 
explains. "All you had to do was change 
words like lift to elevator, and caretaker to 
janitor." 

After getting his education by travel, Cal 
Tinney settled down in Oklahoma to edit a 
country paper, and began to advertise it over 
Station KVOO at Tulsa. That was in 1932. 
His humorous, drawling voice soon became 
more popular than his gazette. So he gave 
up his job as an editor, but since 1934 he has 
written a weekly feature, "Man of the Week " 
for the McKaught Syndicate. He is the 
author, also, of a book called Is It True What 
They Say about London f a Non-Partisan 
Portrait (1936). When Tinney turned to 
radio for a living, his voice was heard, suc- 
cessively, on the March of Time (1932), the 
Voice of America (1933), and the Maxwell 
House Show Boat program (1934). From 
1937 to 1939 he was on the Vatiity Fair fea- 
ture, and from 1939 to 1940 on Youth vs. Age. 
That year he originated, but did not appear 
on. Stop Me If You Heard This One. 

Tinney is married to Mary Maxine Noble. 
The couple have two sons, David N. and 
Scott 

It was in 1940 that Tinney hit on the idea 
of a folksy newscast and tried it out in Tulsa, 
Oklahoma. Farm listeners chuckled, appre- 
ciated a commentator who spoke their own 


11 

2 ?• 






-^tRed Ambassadors 

Sava^Kosanovich of_ Yugoslavia 

By Bocdan^§Uditsa 

Tbit is the first in a series of profiles of the Red 
Ambassadors who represent the several Soviet satellite 
governments in Washington. Others will follow shortly. 

* TJamiuah u they are with the blasts In an Embassy which is more of a 
JT of Vishinsky and Molotov, most propaganda bureau than a diplomatic 
Americans are not aware that some of office, Kosanovich is only the front man 
the most fervid tirades against "U.S. for the Cominform’s schemes in Amer- 
imperialism" delivered in this country ica. The real power in the Embassy is 
come, from an officially accredited am* held by members of the Communist 
' bassador. SatwCosanovich, a wiry, red- Party and the secret police, OZNA, just 

dish-haired man in his early fifties, as its real policy is directed from Mos- , 
j represents Tito in Washington and in cow through Belgrade. Though Kosa- 

I the United Nations. He travels all over novlch repeats the Moscow line, he is 

] this country making speeches in praise not yet one of the inner circle, 

j of the "new progressive democracy" in I first met Kosanovich in the fall of 

) the Balkans, denouncing "Anglo- Amer- 1941 in the United States, where he had 

i j C an reaction" and helping to form front come with some members of the exiled 

j groups for Tito. Incidentally, the Amer- Royal Yugoslav Government, represent- 

; ican ambassador in Yugoslavia cannot ing Croatia, Serbia and Slovenia. The 

* even move around Belgrade without tragicomic adventures of that royal mis* 

f special permits and a guard of secret sion in America centered around the 

! police agents. * battle between those who wanted Yugo- 

, * From Kosanovich's speeches at Lake slavia, after its liberation from the 

Success and elsewhere, it would appear Natis, to become a democratic federal 
T lhtt everything in Yugoslavia before union, and those who demanded a Yu- 

i Tito came to power was reactionary or goslavia which would be a Greater Ser- 

! Fascist. Yet, when he was touring bia administered on the old prewar 

' America during the war, he used to in- pattern. The grim outcome was that 

? troduce himself as a "member of the Tito succeeded in charming American 

j democratic government of His Majesty public opinion with his sweeping prom- 

King Peter the Second." i** of democracy and federation, while 

Kosanovich is k restless man— his the exiles were quarreling among them- 

! face and hands seem to be always agi- selves-mostly for personal, rather than 

I tated and moving. He is a cultured man ideological, reasons. 

! with a long background in liberal, , 

1 democratic movements. But he is a man T7* OSANOVJCH dreamed for a good 

i of strong ambitions, who was willing ^ many years of becoming Yugoslav 

to betray his own . past and his closest ambassador to Washington. His uncle, 

friends for those ambitions. NiCBh^la, was an important scientist 




SAVA KOSANOVICH 


7 


in America. He himself is descended was active, with hfs friends Louis, 
from a long line of Serbian Orthodox'^ Adam ic and the violinist, ZlatlcJKfialV 
ministers. His friends in politics used ic ovic , 40 . the formation aifd promotion 
to tease him about his shyness toward nrThy t Inir*d ^ {_ Smiths 

women, his hatred of smoking and ' Slavic Americans^subsequently metamor- 
drinking. A strong and dynkmic polit- phosed into an important part of the 
ical leader, they said, should be a lady- Kremlin's Pan-Slavic front. 


killer, a hard drinker and a chain 
smoker. 

In prewar Yugoslavia, Kosanovich al- 
ways attached himself to some popular 
political leader. (It seemed to give him 
the feeling that he was running things 
himself.) In the beginning of his 
. career he followed the tide of S vetozar, 
*">Pri bichevic h, the leader of the Demo- 
cratic Party, who sought a highly cen- 
tralized Yugoslav state and drove the 
Communists underground through his 
secret police. That policy helped to re- 
inforce communism for the present job. 
,i . Next, Kosanovich was attracted by 


In his speeches Kosanovich has been 
one of the principal promoters of an 
idea first advanced by Adamic— that 
America is a nation of nations. As such, 
she is not only Anglo-Saxon, but Ger- 
man, Italian, Negro or Slav. The Slavs 
of America should unite in the name of 
brotherhood to carry on their glorious 
traditions, to show other Americans the 
heritage they have brought to this coun- 
try, and to keep in touch with their 
motherlands. On the surface this idea 
seems harmless enough, but it is the 
banner of Stalin's movement to divide 
the United States. Russia and her satel- 


th«sjeaders of the Croatian >raants, lites carry the idea farther in their con- 
Stevan^Radich and Dr. Vj .adiinis^M**-- trolled press by openly maintaining that 
chejc/now in exile in Washington. He America cannot be progressive until it 
considered that he was Machek's is transformed into a series of "people's 
"brain." Machek, however, did not al- republics" on the Soviet pattern, giving 
ways welcome the attentions of his satel- their national sovereignty to all the 
lite: several times he told me that he racial groups that compose the popula- 

was tired of Kosanovich's "old maidish tion. Behind that scheme is the desire 


suggestions and tearful interventions." 
For when he is arguing any involved is- 
sue, Kosanovich's voice takes on a 
querulous tone which makes him sound 
like an adolescent. 

During the war, Kosanovich defended 
Mihailovich and a united Yugoslavia. 
He took an active part in Allied meet- 
ings and the affairs of American Yugo- 
slavs. His name often appeared in the 
"Letters to the Editor" column of The 
New York Times . He was a chairman 
of the Southeastern European Planning 
Board — a movement not popular with 
Stalin, as it threatened to block his plans 
for regional agreements and the artificial 
building up of buffer states. And he 


to Balkanize the United States — to 
divide it into conflicting dans so that 
a revolution may be centralized through 
the only uniting force, the Communist 
Party. 

F iomllo La Guajuma was KOsano- 
vich’s greatest acquisition. He led 
the New York Mayor through the same 
political zig-zag he himself followed — 
first to Mihailovich, then to Tito. The 
speech of greeting to King Peter that 
La Guardia read in Serbo-Croatian on 
July 8 , 1942, was written by Kosano* 
vfch. The Mayor read: 

"Drazha Mihailovich and Vladimir 
Machek are the expression of the Yugo- 





8 


PLAIN TALK 



jliv spirit of resistance — from Triglav was quoted as follows: "Mihailovich is 
to Vardar. They will go down in his* in the position of a General Lee. Tito 
tory. m is some kind of a Lincoln out to save 

In his own speeches Kosanovich often the Union. Mihailovich was an army 
compared Mihailovich with MacArthur, officer. I think he is sincere but he is 
Chiang Kai-shek and Timoshenko. For surrounded by a very bad political en- 
example, at a meeting of the anti-Naxi tourage. The entourage was catastrophic. 
League in New York, June 8, 1942, he The Government, diplomats abroad, 
spoke of "the epic struggle which my working in his name, are even more 
people are making under the man whose catastrophic.** 

name already symbol ires to mankind in* Curiously, Kosanovich himself was a 
domitable spiritual and physical resist* member of that same "catastrophic** 
ance — Drazha Mihailovich." government. When he joined the Yu- 

Mihailovich was killed by a govern* goslav government-in-exile in London 
ment of which Kosanovich was a mem* in the spring of 1944, it had already 
her. Machek fled the country to escape dismissed Mihailovich and sought an 
the fate of Petkov, Maniu and other agreement with Tito’s National Libera- 
peasant leaders. Immediately after he tion Movement 
became Tito's ambassador, Kosaoovich 

quoted Count Gano to prove that Ma* Vino Pbtw was in London. Head* 
chek had been willing to sell out Croa- ing his govemment-in-exile was Dr. 
tia for a relatively small amount of Ival^ubasich, the viceroy of Goatia. 
money. The former follower of Machek The group was more or less agreed that 
admitted intimately to a friend that he Yugoslavia should be restored on the 
did not believe the accusation, but that basis of a federal union. 

Tito had asked him to make it Kosanovich asked for a government 

On July 6, 1942, at a reception held representing all political parties, which 
in the Yugoslav delegation’s mansion would he strong enough to fight the 
on New York's Fifth Avenge, Kosano- Communists. He was a frequent Visitor 
vich introduced MiTlto^Markovich, to King Peter and his mother. And 
editor of the Serbian Codmuhist news- when an agreement was drawn up be- 
paper, Stobodna Roe, and now professor tween Subasich and Tito, Kosanovich 
at Belgrade University. Markovich of* was terribly dissatisfied with its terms, 
fered King Peter a check of ooe thou- (I suspect that was because he had not 
sand dollars for "the Chetniks and regu* taken an active part in it; he was in- 
fer army of General Mihailovich.** dined to think that everything in Yugo- 

A week later orders arrived from slav politics needed his guiding hand.) 
Moscow that Mihailovich should be con- Tito was in Belgrade. The Red Army 
sidered a traitor and Tito accepted as was crossing the Danube in its push to- 
leader of the war for liberation. Marko- ward Vienna. On N JanUary 18, 1945, 
vich and his Serbian equivalent of the Tito*s emissary, GenerarVelebit, visited 
Daily XPorktr suddenly switched to at- Kosanovich in Kingston House, Lon- 
tacking Mihailovich. Kosanovich did don. Kosanovich left the interview pale 
not— but his defense of the Chetniks* and nervous. For the first time he real- 
leader grew weaker. Shortly before he lied that dealing with the Communists 
went to London in March, 1944, Kosa- demanded fortitude, 
novich in a Ntw York Post interview A few dap later, on January 23, King 



SAVA KOSANOVICH 


9 


Peter dismissed Subasich’s cabinet and 
reappointed its members only after all 
of them — including Kosanovich — had 
agreed in writing that, on their return 
to Yugoslavia, they would defend cer- 
tain obligations the king had made con- 
cerning the Tito-Subasich agreement 
The chief obligation was that the new 
united Yugoslav Government to be 
formed under Tito should guarantee all 
fundamental political and civil rights 
and freedoms to the Yugoslav people. 
Kosanovich took a prominent part in 
drafting this public statement announc- 
ing the reappointment of the previous 
cabinet and the obligations its members 
assumed. As the king’s most intimate 
adviser, he drafted Peter’s act of consent 
to the Regency. Before Kosanovich left 
London, the young king kissed him, and 
received his formal promises that he 
would defend the interests of the 
monarchy. 

In the spring of 1943, Yugoslavia 
was "liberated” and the members of its 
London government-in-exile came back 
to join Tito's government with the bless- 
ing of Churchill, Roosevelt and Stalin. 
It was at that time that the Communists 
characterized Kosanovich as a "useful 
innocent" (kori stria bn Jala), In a 
meeting held in a swanky Belgrade 
apartment house — still the headquirters 
of the Communist Party of Yugoslavia 
—the ex-schoolteacher, Edwsr$Kardelj, 
the^Montenegrin, Milovar^Qjilas, and 


other top Communist leaders were talk- X obligations assumed In his agree- 
ing over the political characteristics of ment with Subasich. Bven before the 
their new partners. elections he declared that the king was 

Gjilas said, according to a witness never to come back. Milan Grol and 
who reported the meeting to me: "The others immediately left Tito*a govern- 
Anglo-Americans dream that they may ment. Everybody in Yugoslavia expect- 
influence us through someone who is ed Kosanovich to do the same. But he 
not a Communist. Therefore Ivan Sua— began to yield to the Communists. 
baj jchjs best fitted for the job of' for- Subasich had Just come bade from a 
eign minister. Though he sometimes trip around Yugoslavia. He had seen 
wavers, be defended the agreement with that the people did not want commu- 


Tito stubborqfe in London and Wash- 
ington. MibrftQrol (the vice-premier 
and leader or the Serbian democrats) 
will serve as a Trojan Horse for the 
West. He is a reactionary politiaan who 
backed Mihailovich. If Grol dedares 
that the Serbian people have to aban- 
don Mihailovich, they will accept the 
Idea. As for Kosanovich — he is not an 
important personality nor a politician. 
But he is a useful innocent, who may 
be of help in the United States where 
be is considered to be a Western-type 
democrat.” 

The only member of that London 
government who still survives politically 
is the "useful innocent" Subasich, after 
having been Tito's prime minister and 
foreign minister/ is now a prisoner .in 
Zagreb. Franl^fSpoj, after partidpating 
in the Communist government of Slove- 
nia, was recently sentenced to seven 
years of slave labor for "espionage in 
favor of the Western democracies.” The 
liberal Dr. B. Markovich of Serbia died 
in New York. I arrived there in time 
to see him before his death. After I 
had told him the grim story of what 
YugoslaviaJooked like under the Com- 
munists, be said very sadly: 

"How is it possible that Savitsa (the 
diminutive of Kosanovich’* first name) 
could stay in such an outrageous, gov- 
ernment ?*' 

T iro soon began to Ignore all the 
obligations assumed in his agree- 
ment with Subasich. Bven before the 
elections he declared that the king was 
never to come back. Milan Grol and 
others immediately left Tito's govern- 
ment. Everybody in Yugoslavia expect- 
ed Kosanovich to do the same. But he 


10 


PLAIN TALK 


I 


nism; they wanted! quick Action by the 
democrats. And be had the courage to 
tell this to Tito. Although he was for- 
eign minister, he was arrested. 

I was with Kosanovich in his room 
in Belgrade's Hotel Majestic when Mrs. 
Subasidi telephoned and asked for im- 
mediate help. Her husband was arrested 
and ill Kosanovich tried to reassure 
her. He telephoned Lt General Ranko- 
vich, OZNA's chief trigger-man. The 
Communist hangman answered coldly 
that nothing would happen to the for- 
eign minister. Precautions were merely 
being taken to defend him from any 
attempt of the "Western reactionaries" 
upon his life. 

We had just been reading Dante 
there in the hotel room — the part where 
Count Ugolino hungrily devours the 
brain of Archbishop Ruggieri, describ- 
ing the merciless end of all traitors. The 
blood and turmoil of ancient fratricidal 
war rose before us: it seemed very near 
to our own Yugoslav tragedy. 

Only a little later Kosanovich entered 
the new People’s Front against the will 
of the Independent Democratic Party, 
of which he was Secretary-General. His 
party issued a clandestine communique 
describing his defection. Soorv^fter that 
the chairman of the party. Dr. feflosh- 
Jcovich, was terribly beaten for three 
hourPby a Communist youth mob. He 
was lying in a hospital the same night 
that Kosanovich was flying to the Lon- 


don conference of the Big Four, acom- 
panying the Communist Kardelj as a 
"liberal and democrat** Before he left 
Kosanovich had published an article in 
the Communist official organ, Borb*, in 
which be attacked Subasidi and the 
leadership of the party with whom he 
had worked dosely for twenty years. 
The rnmmuniet wanted a proof of 
"betrayal." And the price was paid. 
From London, Kosanovich went to the 
Paris Peace Conference, and from there 
to Washington — to attack American 
democracy, which he had formerly 
praised. 

I cannot BELIEVE Kosanovich is a 
happy man, though he has attained 
his ambition. Those who once opposed 
fascism and are now serving commu- 
nism have lost all faith in themselves 
and in mankind. There are no more 
miserable people than the intelligentsia 
who know better — but who have been 
afraid to resist in the last battle for 
man’s liberty. 

Kosanovich once asked for a synthesis 
between political and economic democ- 
racy for the good of the people, and be 
is now defending the complete subjuga- 
tion— economic, political and moral— 
of Yugoslavia to the Communists. Ko- 
sanovich once wanted Yugoslavia to be 
free of the influence of any big power, 
and be is now ambassador of a puppet 
state in Stalin's empire. 






rr ^ * 

FEDIEAl-^BU 


HE AO 



Case Originated At: PITTSBURGH 


j Report Made At 
I ‘ PITTSBURGH 


Date Made Period 

S:”' 


Title 

7 "'sLOBODNA EEC *fpBEE 


EXPRESSION) 


O / 

‘ .. 

'xjJ_ rile Ho. 61- 1W 
Report Made By ’ 

LOUIS H. BEIG^SDSR 

Character 

INTERNAL SECURITY - C 
REGISTRATION ACT 


SYNOPSIS: SLOBODNA EEC (Free Expression).,’ Serbian communist-line tri-weekly 

newspaper printed at 1.916 East St.-, Pittsburgh, Pa. , steadfastly 

a to the generally recognised Communist line and operates, 

erbs in the U. S. , as the organ for the dissemination of 
tion on Serbian affairs In ’Yugoslavia. As the leading Slav 
st organ it contained, daring the period from 12/6/44 to 
, favorable publicity for 'such communist front organizations 
SWCXAaerican Slav Congreqs^Tidovdao Committee and the^aited 
se_of Sou th Slavic Americ a ns. It supported the TITO and. \ 
sjovemments unequivocally .and denounced opposition believed 
b against thesegovernoents. Due to the leaving of the former 
Cn-Chief , MIRKty&ARZOVICHj. to confer with TITO and his repre- 
ss in Belgrade, /Yugoslavia, the editorship has been under- 
r Reverend NIKOL^V)EENOVAO. v The Managing Editor is JJHAEL3S_ 
id Business Manager is KAlJEypUSNJAR, all-associated with the 
jt movenent in Western Pennsylvania. / 


mi 


59 J'JN17$6 » ?»\ 


• Cc> '"'i ' l .7 /l \ 1 ' 

7A; ). A 

. ! . i • • 1 1 -/ t 





Pgk. Tield Division 
61-118 


° f C T 1 ! t ! coordinatlon w «h the Communist Party movement in > 
SMbSI L \\ l indiCated * 1118 individual editorial policy in . 

in TTT j^uf other foreign language communi st org ans, as will he show^* 

on *** of *ki® report, SLOBQDNA BfiC did not pursue a predominate loyalty 
to the American Communist Party, hut rather concentrated its efforts on foreign 
•news, policy and information. 

The administration of SLOBODNA BSC during the period covered hy this reoort may 
. he seen to pursue a more cautious line or policy regarding the printing of 
sources of news items and other information in the newspaper. Many items appear 
in/ the translations of this newspaper which of necessity must have heen derijj^d 
^■rpn^a foreign source. One 6uch source may he pointed out in that during «thir 
eajjj^ y .p art of 1945 MARSOVICH had installed in his home a Hanerlin model short- 
wave radio receiver with a special short-wave antenna and with logging for radio 
Belgrade. 


IO 

L1C 


Translations of SLOBODF^RE^as^ontalned in this report were made at t 
burgh Elel d Office Serbo-Croatian translator, am 

I Slavonic tr^ns^tor^^^^^^^^ 


Pitts- 



II 

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE 


X - OFFICERS 


jn the “Statement Of The Ownership, Management, Circulation, Etc., Required By il 
The Acts Of Congress Of August 24, 1912, and March 3, 1933," regarding newspapers 
ut^^^^^^^^^^ls as a means of transmission, furnished the Pittsburgh Office 
hyj^^^^^^^^^VPoreman, Pittsburgh Post Office, the following are given as 
officer^^^^^ffluDNA EEC: 


Publisher 

Editor 

Managing Editor 
Business Manager 
Owner 


J.^ZRSTOVICH 
CHARIES\^UICK 



HUSHNAR . 
KRSTOVICE 


This statement was filed at the Pittsburgh Post Office by MANE SHUSHNAR on Octo- 
ber 2, 1945. 


bit 


t 



Pgh. Field Division 
61-118 


**2. It is true that this year's calendars vere printed too late, 
but we have inspitc of this sold a sufficient number of calendars 
and some of the sollers have not sent in their money. In addition 
to the excellent success in advertisements for the calendar and be- 
sides the fact that the calendar was excellent, the work of the sale 
of the calendars is not satisfactory. Our activists should have paid 
more attention to this then than before selling the calendars. 

"3. Soon wc shall have received several hundred copies of the new 
book 'Guns For Tito.* We ought to do our best to sell these books 
as 60on as possible. The book was compiled by an American Major who 
organized a shipment of weapons to TITO's Army and met TITO person- 
ally several times. The price of the book is $2.75. 

"4. We must finish the sale of the book of NIEOI^^TESLA. We should 
particularly interest the American engineers and unionist s in it. 

"5. Soon a book of HI RZO M ARKOVICH. vi 1 1 bo off the press: 'That We 

May Understand Each Other. ' Therefore it will be necessary to organ- 
ize the sale of the sane. The book contains 350 pages and the price 
of the same i6 $2.50. 

The working committee decided that b' r the end of the month of Majrch 
or in April, FIEKO MARSOVICH should start for the Pacific Coast, to 
California, to work in the strengthening of our movement and news- 
paper and in building up of clubs and the apparatus. This will be 
discussed in detail at the meeting of the Supreme 3oard in Cleveland." 

August 14, 1945 "Reorganization Of Leadership Of Serbian Pro- 
gressive Movement In City Of Akron Carried Out." 
This article, which is quoted below, indicates 
the then policy of SL030DHA ESC in its leader- 
ship in the Serbian Progressive Movement in the 
United States. 

"Akron, August 10 - Last week, on Thursday evening, there was here 
held a special meeting of the Serbian political progressive club, 
which was attended by the editor-in-chief of SLC30D1TA EEC, MRKD 
MARKOVICH, and the manager of the paper, KAilE SHU SHU AR. 


- 18 - 



nwM no. #4 


Vffice Mei/ivr wrldum • UNITED GOVERNMENT 


FB.OM 


: Diroctar, FBI 
■ SAC, Pittsburgh 


DATE: November 7, 19^7 


SUBJECT: SLOBCDNA REC 

INTERNAL SECURITY - C 
REGISTRATION ACT 


The following article which appeared in the November 1, 19^7, ieaue of the 
above oaptioned Communist line newspaper published at 1916 East Street, 
Pittsburgh, Pa., is furnished fear your information: 

Address of Aabassadd?~»6SAN0VICH at Banquet of 2nd Serbian 
Congress, October 26 in Pittsburgh, Pa, ~ 

'Alt r^CiSATICN CCSTAES& 

hz:zik is itclassifis) t 

Brothers and Sisters : DAl£_3t_ a ' < ^ * * ^ _.?<’•!’ 5jP* * _y > C 

& 'jL^/SCO 

I oome among you to extend you the greetings of the peoples and the 
government of the Federated People's Republic of Yugoslavia, headed 
by Marshal Tito and to thank you for the considerable aid which you 
have given your brothers in the old homeland. 

By ooinoidenoe, I found myself in the period of 19 W 4 ; in this great 
oountry where I did ay best to defend the truth and contribute to the 
best of ay ability to the thwarting of spreading untruths an the 
part of the official representatives of the then Yugoslav government 
in exile and of all those who wanted to oonvince public opinion of 
Amerioa and its offioial oiroles of the impossibility of restoring 
Yugoslavia. I recall your valuable help of that time. I remember 
a dear friend in the person of the late Rev. KRAJNOVICH and his con- 
stant struggle, as well as of so many others of that period. 

You Americans of Serbian deseent were hit the hardest. You were 
exposed to the greatest trials and the heaviest attaoks. You had 
to exercise the greatest self-denial and perspective oorreotly to 
see the oourse of events because every effort was made to confuse 
you. The Idea was that when Serbian Americans follow the wrong 
path, when ohauvinism and national hatred get possession of them, 
when hatred toward the Croats and Slovenes and toward Yugoslav unity 
is aroused in them, then it will be easy for the same attitudes to 
work among Croatians and Slovenes an regards Yugoslav unity, giving 
ohauvinism full sway and thus contributing to the weakening of the / 
war effort in American and rendering impossible the struggle far the 
salvation and restoration of Yugoslavia and the Balkans. 

In a letter of thanks for an honor which was shown me in February, 
19144 ., by a great number of you who are new assembled at this Serbian 


y\ - n if 

■i J- 4 


rfECORDBP- 
INDEXED I 


ii- 


FE 

‘te * v -v • 


1 



s' 


To: Director, FBI November 7# 19^+7 

Be : SLOBODNA. REC 

18 - C; REGISTRATION ACT 


Congress when I was elected an honorary president of the Vidovdan 
Congress I said: 


"In an extraordinary difficult period of manlcind you have with 
sacrifice and self-denial done your duty also toward your people from 
whom you sprang and toward America of which you are good oitisens, and 
toward mankind. Since my arrival in America in 19^1, in *n official 
capacity, I found among you the best understanding and best oooperation 
for an ever greater unification of national forces in the struggle 
against all manifestations of fascism. Together we tried to bo as 
serbs - bearers of Serbo-Croato-Sloveno-Kacedonian harmony and unity 
at a time when the enemy banked his entire hope on disharmony and 
hatred. Yf or king thus we have contributed to the correct understanding 
of the national -liberation struggle beset with so many obstacles and 
bedevilled with 60 much gossip. Time and events have borne out the 
truth thereof." 

And when taking leave of Serbs in America in a letter of July 2 Li, 

19^4, among other things I wrote: 



"We have here been those who have defended the purity of the Serbian 
name at a time when it was being most degraded by the ignorant. 

History will show that we were right and that by our defending the 
unity of Serbs, Croats, Slovenes, and Macedonians we have best rep- 
resented the true national Serbian interests and thus represented the \ 
interests not only of Yugoslavia but also of America and all United 
Nations. We have by oommon sacrifices of a liberation war achieved 
great successes in the oountry, but there still are great trials. 

Enemies will particularly seek to confuse the Serbs and destroy them 
with false defense of Serbian interests. I ask all my good friends 
to make every effort to promote harmony and unity. I ask all those 
who were being deceived in returning to Serbian tradition and enter 
the great circle of national harmony ... I ask friends who have had 
the opportunity and bravery of seeing the right path from the very 
outset, that they forgive thoaa who haven't seen it because they were 
deceived by those who thought they must be believed. The true 
national ohampion is known by his setting the errant ones on the 
right path. Responsible culprits who misused their positions and 
misused the credulity of the ignorant will answer to the people for 
their misdeeds. The more you will promote harmony, the better it 
will be for Serbdom, far Yugoslavia, and for America - toward which 
you have the greatest obligation." 


•2 - 


/ 



To: Director, FBI November 7# 19U7 

Re : SLOBCDNA REC 

IS - C; REGISTRATION ACT 


.That was the path to which yon were oalled until hi 8 last days ty 
our great countryman NIKOT A^fTSSLA . 

Aryl you, by your moderation, have contributed to the interest of the 
democratic struggle of the world. You have contributed to the unifi- 
cation of all national forces in America in the organization of the 
war effort. And at the same time, as Americans of Serbian descent 
together with other Yugoslav Americans, you have shown your Amerioan 
fellow-citizens that your brothers in the old homeland are with 
united efforts residing fascism and struggling for freedom and the 
restoration of their independent state, Yugoslavia. 

In this you were able to be the best spokesmen. You and your predeces- 
sors have come to this country in search of freedom and better 
economic conditions. 



I 


Most of you and those before you have fled from Hapsburg serfdom be- 
oause you were being oppressed both nationally end economically. 

You and, your predecessors made valuable contributions to the develop- 
ment of the New World. You with your brother Slovenes and Croatians 
have sweated, shed blood, worn your bones, expended brains, and what- 
not for the progress of this oountry. Long is the chain of miners, 
farmers, scientists, and soldiers who gave their best for the general. | 
progress and prosperity of the American Union. You have conscientiously 
been doing your duty and you have become good citizens of this great 
land. Who of us is not proud of the work, life and nobleness of 
NIKOLA TESLA without whose work end mind electricity would not be what 
it now is in the world; whose motor has harnessed the Niagara and the 
Dnieper, turning the wheels of industry wherever there is electricity? 

In every spark of electricity, shines his name. America is the 
greatest beneficiary of TESLA 1 s genius. He asked for no riohes. 


And so, brothers and sisters, when during the war you have raised your 
voice for your brethren in the Balkans struggling not only for their 
life but also for a better and more secure existence of mankind, your 
voice thus had significance and importance. You were able to be the 
authorized spokesmen of the struggle which was going on over there. 



“ 5 - 



FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


Ktonn No. 1 


This case oricinatted at PITTSBUEjQH , PJtHll STLTAITIA . 100^2380 


REPORT MADE AT 


tXATX WHIN MADE 4 • PERIOD FOR 
V h . V ;. MAOC 


iTLWAPKBVWI&raSlK .j^-g/4/45 ^fj|/6>/45 

rmJI -'V ; 70- '■■»': ■ i •" ; 

: HAHOlMlrGLAfflH (fhe^ationai Herald) 


Sj&s.v g&m* 

mr^waasi js.Zv.JF* 


. . ( .* > - • • • * * . ; . . " i ,V 

- , X »; CHARACTIRORCAtf -* vX ,- .• . 

lv 'VK> v •* • ; £* ♦* ; \> • 

; r uctbsal saouBisji - o - 


I /SYNOPSIS OF FACTS: 


rsznouarcs: 


The 37th Anniversary Celeb rat ieu ofthO exietenoe 
ef I ABOUT I SLASH Laid in Milwaukee, Wls. 3/18/45. 

Known CPJjMbers-m^cjpathixsrs present 

iMy|tUg>^fl||H|HB^H|^^^|^^|ffpathiser,u^^^H 

ko« fSr ^^ ._. .. 

■SDeR^pwSSf^^^^HHHj^^a ehar*e of general ; V . . 
nrraag — ante forneetlag^onlef speaker MBS. IUBI./:-" ' 
KBNJAC of Chicago, 111., officer of the Supreme 
Committee of Croatian Fraternal Union, Work of 
H ABO IN I GLASNIIC in connection with present War effort 
and particularly in support of Marshal TITO set forth ; ' * 
by various speakers, , /■ 

• • 1TT tnfoRMATION CONTAINED 

\ . > . ptrEIN is unclass I fi id jf 

Letter from Pittsburgh to Mllwankee dated l/ld/45, . 

Beport of Special Agent HABBT MOBBI 9GB dated ‘ 

4/28/41 at Pitteburgi, Pa. 


LBEAILSI 

C 


.Confidential Inforaant^^adrieed that under Ante 
of Februaxy 18, 1945, he waa i‘la attendance at* tile * f. 
37th. Anniversary Oelebratlohiaf WABODTI CASMIX (The g 
SatlonUl Herald) , < a Croatian ^language newspaper, 

•which celebration was hold in 'Harmony Hall located ' 

at 929 South Sixth 8treet, Milwaukee, 1 Wisconsin. /* 

"i- 1 v *■• 


wjzwsmr&si 


SpsCiai. A6Pg 


5 - bureau 

4 - Pittsburgh . vT 

1 - Chicago (info) < ^ ^ 7 s ^ 

2 - Milwaukee ^ f p- 




DO NOT WRITE IN THESE SPACES 


A/OU 3 W 7 K: 


Aj J 

Artiit 


^ • *• 



y 


7 — 2034 


Hi 100-2225 


j-' The next speaker Introduced by Chairmen JUB07ICH was & ME* 
CHEISJyxTkaIiACHI vhe spoke on the need of funds for the continued support 
of the paper JUBOIHI OhAfflll. . \ 


i : -ei 'following this, waa a speech hy Mr* T2JS 

fe:i^P«4.oo4 the HABOLKI GL LB BTK tmr its.Weindsfful wofki 


EAK, wBbetlso 


- At tho conclusion of these various speeches, JT7B0TICH acting /> 

as Chairman, again discussed the need. of funds for SABDEHI CLASHIX and i 
requested a collection froa the aodlsnoe* He told then’ that the amount f 
collected was $586), 10* •- . . \ I 

According tofl^f the celebration ciosed at approximately 9 >15 >; 
^^^^^Kg^^hat dnru^xho coarse of the. af to moon he was contacted by . 

known CPA neater, who gar# hia a pamphlet entitled "The 
Bculet^^^^me United Committee of South-Slsvlc Americans 1 dated Hot enter, 
1944* ads reference to an article la. this pamphlet which was written 



1944* 1 
by LOUlJ 
dent oi 
to sell] 
of HIKDI 


CSDuO, formerly President of the AKKBIClH BL&CC 
I mriTID COMMITTEE OF SOUTH-SLAT IC AKEEIClffS. M 
la book entitled "The Prodigal Genius", whic^S 
rESLA written by JOHH JjJvO*KEIL* He also showed! 


! SS and Pro si- ... 
[then attempted 
e life story 
a calendar 
a8cism, Free- 


wlth a picture of Marshal TITO and the inscription "Death^^rascism, Free- 
don for the People", .He explained that these calendars were being printed 
In Canada and he was taking orders for then^ " 1 ■■ — - 


Confidj 
arrangements with! 
celebration over ! 


P advised that he had previously Bade 
announcing the proposed banquet and 
-J-£ on the.. Croatian Badlo Hour* 


IfHHwas also present at .the 37th Anniversary Calcbrati 
e daforaation set forth by Confidential Informant^H^K 


at lea and con- 


firmed the 


The following indlvldusils were listed 
this meeting) 


as being present at 




M O "• 


Hi 100-2225 


KEY SggET 


Confidential Informant! 


. . 


Confidential Informant* 


r • #k 

V • 


•V. . ‘1 




- T -4 




5 














*•••' Va#’ w vr -i f— r~ 

: Vcein No. 1 • ; •; "; t,^ : 

‘ THIS CASK ORIGINATED AT.*' 


Pi;' 

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v ~ £ ig v* A i£ ^ ; 


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WM 

vM 

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^gehsrax AgTiviTm -v>; ^ • ;r- 




a, C The Washington Post* for July 23, 1&6, carries Vheaffifie^ 

Mite an - i n teryiew had with the ; new Yugoslav Ambassador 'SkW$MW$tof 

mi- entitled "War Over. Trieste ttpt Anticipated hy Yi^oslav Envoy 1 * ' 

rife^f^^e had^ 9 lawd ; oh t^ that j his country wouid.'not' HSs 


tu&k 


«ag$" 


|«tftn .theiy es^eritiai interest3*;'He v saidM^ 

^proposals Tor a ; plebecite in the disputed area tecause the '^YugosIav^popi^tipTi 
m i had been diminished by twenty-six years of Italian rule and -the additio^l^ 
i-.^-loss of 56,000 men in the fight against -'the" Nazis 

I.--. \ A. *- ’-.v-U - T pWSSIHED BVlflfOfolA 




SraCtAL AOCMT 


DO NOT WRIT! IN THESE SPACES 




tykcfr&t 






i mint* 'V h IWf i i r ^?4£a 








wo 100-11980 


Bureai 


^Confidential Informant! 


erred with Ambassador 

R'SSuvT^an^toi^ni^tnc^TIoui^ffiCal^na^contacted her in order to find 
out definitely when KOSANOVIC was coming to New York City. It appears that 
ADA.. IC planned to be in New York himself on the following Thursday and 
expressed a desire to have KOSANOVIC be there on Thursday night. KOSANOVIC , 
told her he was leaving for Paris the following Sunday morning at 11:00 Ala* ' 
He was told that ADkiilC would like to have dinner with him on Thursday night 
and on Friday morning for him to meet "this fellow that he has been talking 
about.'* KOSANOVIC said he knew it was something about publicity; KOSANOVIC 
stated he was not very happy about having to go to Paris. He said he hadn't 
JJfui^hed ending'* and that it was very complicated. He indicated that 
■■■■would accompany him to Paris. They expressed amusement over the 
^otar^^ account of KOSANOVIC* s press conference the previous day.j^J^J^ 

The article in the "Evening Star” which was referred to above 
appeared July 23, 19h6, and was entitled "New Envoy Disclaims Any Yugoslav 
Plans for Coup at Trieste." This article was written by NEiVBOLD NOYES, JR. 
The article quotes the Ambassador as saying that Yugoslavia would not be 
"provoked into compromising the peace." The article stated that the 
Ambassador had indicated his country would boycott Trieste if they did not 
get it. The article stated that KOSANOVIC is a nephew of NICOJA-HTESLA., the 
Yugoslav-American inventor. 


iper coverage 
[said there ws 


conferred 

with^^^^^^^^^^mjH^mB||BHB|HHB||^^^^^^^Prelative to the 

news^pe^ previous day. 
■■■said thgr^^^^^^ttle on the first page of the ''New York Herald 

said there was quite a bit in the "New York Times" 
also. ^^^^■toT^^^^^nat he expected more in the "Evening Star” than had 
appear e^^^^he "Washington Post” because he had "one of their good people, 
who was very favorably impressed and said he would say so." f Q^)[\ 


rriDUM 
also. ■ 
appearec 


■■■learned on July 30, 19^6, that 
OR^^ff ice and advised that the Ambass 


Senator TAYLOK's office and advised that the 
lunch with Senator ?aYL 0R at the Senate dini: 
along with some other members of the Senate. 


contacted 
ike to have 
room on Thursday at 1:00 P.ia. 


ing room 

•VOK 


Informant learned on the following day that 
arrangements for Ambassador KOSANOVIC to have lunch with Senator r. 
probably Senator AIAGNUSON in the Senate dining room. 

Informant also learned on July 31, 19^6, that Senator PEPPER ygfa 
had accepted the invitation to have lunch with the Ambassador at 1:00 P.ii/^^j 



4 


i * 

i * 

r* * ■"* 



'•’. • ».. >T ;• ' >:,• -&V4r^^^$4QgJI& INFORMATION CONTAINED • ..., •;;•• 

' :'■ V * FEDERAL BUREAU OF *fo**^*i«u^ = 


WnKo.1 . : - T ... 

THIS CASK ORIGINATED AT . 


© 


REPORT MADK AT ' : .V-J 

OATK WHSH 

WASHINGTON.; D: C. .’ 

* ^..V.;lv i V,-*. •. : * V 

*•■ : •;• . V v\ : • •• 

' IIADj 

/!-/*-¥? 






IN ^H^tmiTED jST^TE^gJS 


'CHARACISROTCASK -.1 

^ INTERNAL SECURITY - -TU 


[SYNOraiS O^ PACTS 



K*! 

•jl ~\$ui 
•i 



APPROVED AJNO 
FORWARD 



t^oj 

aJSr-fc-i’fl’" 

r* cw 


, lfll _ 

.^Mfencef V .., ( ftflBurea 


M ^ COWOrTHICMFOItT *’ 

q {§)-. Bureau Detroit . .Portland 
1 - Info«: ; Los Angeles Seattle : -K 
Buffalo Milwaukee •« ASt; Louis 
. Boston ..' New. York/* ffc'/ySan Francis 


Chicago Ne 
Cle " 


'3r*;po 




Lie 



WFO 100-11980 


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SAVA B^SOSANOVIC 
Ambassador 


rsAVi 

1 Amba 


ik 




KOSANOVIC came as Yugoslav Ambassador in approximately July of 
1946, presenting his credentials to the President on July 18, 1946. 
KOSANOVIC is generally considered not a Communist but an opportunist. 

He is a member of the Independent Democratic Party and previously 
served as a Minister under the Royal Government. He was born at 

29, 1894 t was a nephew of the famous inventor, 


Plaski, Croatia, Jlav 2 
NIKOL^T&LA. 




i 


X 


- 5 - 








4-750 (Rev. 9-29-9J) 


xxxxxx 

xxxxxx 

xxxxxx 



FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
FOIPA 

DELETED PAGE INFORMATION SHEET 

Page(s) withheld entirely at this location in the file. One or more of the following statements, where indicated, 
explain this deletion. 




Deletions were made pursuant to the exemptions indicated below with no segregable material available for 
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Section 552 


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□ (k)(6) 

O (b)(6) 


□ (k)(7) 


□ Information pertained only to a third party with no reference to the subject of your request or the subject of your 
request is listed in the title only. 

□ Documents originated with another Government agency(ies). These documents were referred to that agencyriesl 
for review and direct response to you. 

Pages contain information furnished by another Government agcncyties). You will be advised by the FBI as 

to the rclcasabilitv of this information following our consultation with the other agencyties). 


Pagc(s) withheld inasmuch as a final release determination has not been made. You will be advised as to the 
disposition at a later date. 


Pages were not considered for release as they arc duplicative of 


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A />/>£/> AS yV 


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The followinc number is to be used for reference regards 

a y 


ng these pages 


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X Deleted Pagc(s) X 
X No Duplication Fee X 
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IBIDOJ 


\ * 




federal Surrau of InueBtigatinn 
Jlntfpb State s department of Ifuatiee 


Form No.'l 

This Case Originated At INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 

if . — Report -MEnUrAt j Date "" 1 J — FerToc[ 

f 

^ Indianapolis, Indiana ll/l8/42 10/29, 30/42 


'AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS XALL-SLAV CONGRESS) 


File No.- 100-4006 


CLARENCE E. CLAY 
Character of Case 


CEC:NJO 


INTERNAL SECURITY - C 


Synopsis: 


p ■ 


Information contained in "bulletin entitled 
"News Flashes from Czechoslovakia under Nazi 
Domination" issued "by Czechoslovak National 
Council of America, with reference to Ameri- 
can Slav Congress, set forth herein. Includes 
information concerning the permanent committee 
set-up and a partial list of delegates to the 
American Slav Congress. "Also set forth is a 
fcTbtory of th^All Slav Congress’ which was 
twritten bv ■^B^B-Informatlonj»received that 


Lve^that 

rpo^e^to 


gjiKsW °* ^ry, mdianA, gTld repoTTea 

ySluni sts,. attended the All Slav Congress. 
jHHftattended All Slav Congress. , 


o/s 4 i 

b2^ - ^ 




References ^ ^ 

a r ra ^ 

t> y ^ Report of Sbecial Agent CHARLES M. SOLOMON, 

if? {if ‘ ' Zy dated May 12, 1942, at Ihtroit, Michigan. 

' *" r ' 

Details: At Hammond. Indiana. 

^ 

Z&CS f) IA , ?E 01D Confidential Informal 


- p - ALL INFORMATION CONTAINED 
HERON IS UNCLASSIFIED 


has "been obtained 


b-T 


Do Not Write in These Spaces 







4 


4 




b 



a copy of a bulletin entitled "iii.ws Flashes from Czechoslovakia' 
under Nazi Domination”, published by the Czechoslovak National 
Council of America, 4049 Vest Twenty-sixth Street, Chicago, Illi- 
nois, release no. 132, dated Kay 11, 1942; 

This bulletin contains nevs concerning the American Slav 
Congress held at Detroit, Kichig?«n, April 25 and 26, 1942. The 
article contains the permanent committee set-up of the Congress 
and a list of men of eminence’ among the delegates to the Congress. 

This article is being quoted below: 

"AMERICAN SLAT CONGRESS FOR GREATER VAR EFFORT” 

The coordination activities of all groun9 of Slavic 
extraction in America for an intensified war effort 
moved a long step closer to reality as a result of 
the American Slav Congrecs held in Detroit April 25 
and 26 and attended by more than 2300 delegates re- 
presenting church, fraternal, labor, social and 
cultural groups from all parts of the country. Every 
substantial American Slav organization in the country 
was represented. 


Permanent Committee Set Up 

A permanent committee was elected with LE^SERZYCKI, 
Vice-president of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers 
for President; Prof. J. J.>2MRHAL, of the ^Czechoslovak 
National Council, Vice-president; STEPHEN^EMAN, JR., 
of the Slovak Evangelical Union, Secretary; VINKO^tUK, 
.of the Croatin Fraternal Union, Treasurer; and BLAIR F. 
i^KJNTHER, member of the Educational' Committee of the 
Polish National Alliance, Chairman of the Board of 
Directors. 

Participating Slavic nationality groups elected vice- 
presidents to the Board of Directors. Vice-presidents 
for the respective nationality groups elected were: 
EDMUNDv£OI NC , Polish; W. J.NKUZIK, Czech; V. S.^LATEK, 
Slovak;’ VASIIr'-DICOFF, Bulgarian; SAMUEE^ERLINICH, 
Serbian; J0EN*SUTK0VICH, Croatian; VINCENTTSAINXAR, Slo- 
vene; PETER^RATICA, Carpatho-Russian; GEORGlfXHRINSXY, 
Macedonian ;’ HARRY/EUBESHKOFF, Russian; KICEAEI^JKATCH, 
Ukrainian. 


- 2 - 



0 



The various nationality groups also elected members 
to the nationality committees of the Board of 
Directors. The National Committee of the congress 
held its first plenary session in Pittsburgh, May 10, 
to plan steps to translate the decisions of the con- 
gress into action. 


Anti-Hitler Measures Adopted 

Main decisions embodied in the resolutions of the 
congress were: 

1. To make a direct appeal to American Slavs com- 
prising more than half the workers in the war essential 
industries of the nation to intensify their production 
efforts to outproduce Hitler and the Axis. 

2. To intensify vigilance pgain6t fifth-columnists 
operating within the various Slavic groups in this 
country aiming to sow division and disunity in the war 
effort. 

3. To chart a plan to recruit 50,000 American Slav 
volunteers for n house-to-house campaign among American 
Slav families for raising the amount of war bond sub- 
scriptions to 10 per cent of income. 

4. To take all measures to strengthen the bonds of 
solidarity among American Slav groups and between them 
and the Slav peoples of Europe for a concerted effort 
against HITLER. 

5. To increase support of all war relief agencies, 
particularly the Hussian, Yugoslavian, Polish, Czecho- 
slovakian, British, Greek and Chinese. 

6. To take steps to counteract the appeasers. 

7. To set up a permanent organization to coordinate 
and assist in carrying out the decisions adopted by the 
Congress. 


Eesponse Exceeds Anticipations 

The response to the first American Slav Congress ever 
held in America exceeded all anticipation's. It re- 
vealed the depth of anti-Axis feeling thpt has seized 
hold of the -fcoericans of Slav descent who came expressing 
desires to do their utmost to the end that the power of 
Hitlerism, arch-foe of the Slav peoples ns of froedom- 
loving peoples everywhere shall be decisively smashed. 


- 3 - 



c 


s 



The delegates were mostly brawny men from coal mines, 
steel mills, machine shops — the men on whom the nation 
1 8 counting for much of its war essential goods pro- 
duction and wholesome-looking women whose faces showed 
hardening lines of determination beneath war smiles. 


Men of Snlhence Among Delegates . 1 

Among the delegate's were men and women of distinction 
• in many fields of petivity — scholars, writers and 
clergymen, among / them Rev. VIKC3N&30B1C0YI0Z, who re- 
presented the ffify^ Rcv'. £1 shop STsftui S, WOZNlCKI > 
at the Congre.s-i. and delivered the opening invocation; 
Metropolitan^St-shop 3enjaain, of the Russian Orthodox 
Church; Most Bcv. J AJ1I07 1 CH of Johnstown, Pennsy 
1 vania, and Eevr^WLOWSZI, df Buffalo, New York. 

Among others present were JOSEPlSWATTRAS, director of 
£he Polish National Alliance of Pittsburgh; CHESTER A. 
^fGLZDROJ, President of the Polish Central Citizens' Com- 
'mittee of Detroit; Judge l« NfcRQNKOWSKI of Kamtranch; 
Captain VT^SDiAlI, Polish War Veterans, Chicago; Dr. W. 
TNOSOWSEI; chairman Michigan All Slav Committee, Detroit; 
Mis. M.y^jiESTEROWICZ, dear of Polish Journalists, Buffalo, 
New York; ZLATK^SALOKONICE, famed Croatian violinist; 
FRAinJNJSIGQRSXI, assistant district attorney of Milwaukee 
and president of the Pulaski Council there; VINCEMT^LEIN, 
Secretary Chrysler Local No. 17 of UAW-CIO; Michigan State 
Senator, STANLEYTTOWAK; Prof. J. J.^JMREfcL, President of 
the Czechoslovak Natl one-’. Council; tTOSEPH^XRTINEK, Exe- 
cutive Secretary of the Czechoslovak National Council, 

. C hicago; KAREIrtRRCEAL, President of the American 8okol 
Union; ADO£5^ikCER, President of the Czech American 
National Alliance; VliTCBNT^VEDSXY, Secretary of the Cxech 
American National Alliance; Ber. JAN SttBRaDAC, Honorary 
president of the Slovak National Alliance; BeV. ARNOST 
f$l7Zk of the Federation of American Czechoslovaks in 
Texas; NICOLA/teSSLA, Serbian American inventor; ET3IN 
-sERISTAlT, prominent Slovenian writer; Dr. D. £ s j$Q».TICH, 
^first vice-president Michigan All-Slav Committee; SAMUEL 
**^SRLINICH, President of the Serbian National Federation, 
Pittsburgh; Judge ANTHONTj^LUCAS , Pittsburgh; Ohio -State - 

Senator*>B0YD-30ICH; Judge GEORGS SXJEIHSY, Cleveland; ’ 

v •' \ 




- 4 - 



0 





.VNIK, Slovcnska ITar qdn a Podporna Jcdnota; 
■-iSSSTiCO , Cleveland; W77KUZIK, President of 
. the Czechoslovak Society of America; and Mrs. MARIE 
V^CRAL of the Nat 1 1 Alliance of Czech Catholics. 


/ 


From the serious and restrained mood of the delegates 
it was visible they had coue for the one purpose of 
agreeing on a common line of action to be taken to 
guarantee a speedy end of HITLER and the. Axis. There 
was a notable absence of the usual convention hilarity 
and abandon. 


An International Event 

It was a wartime mating dominated by a wartime grim- 
ness. That the deliberations of the congress would 
have international repercussions was evidenced in the 
more than thousand telegrams from all parts of the world 
that reached the congress during the sessions. 

One of the wires greeting it was from a Czech group 
in Teheran, Persia; there were many from Slavic groups 
in Chile, Argentina, Canada, and throughout America. 
6oviet writers and scientists and members of the Yugl- 
elav government in Kuibyshev wired the congress messages 
of greetings end good wishes. • 

The Congress was not only an event significant in the 
history of America's 15 million Slav-descended citizens 
but fraught with meaning for the destiny of the more 
than 200 millions of Slav peoples across the seas en- 
gaged in a life-and-death struggle against Nazi enslavers 

For the first time the peoples of the diverse Slavic 
groups in America were reaching a common understanding 
on a world-wide issue — a matter that gave delegates a 
feeling of considerable satisfaction. 

Far beyond the brilliantly delivered keynote speeches 
and the iron note of resolve sounded in the resolutions — 
all of which raised the assembly to wild cheers of en- 
thusiasm — was the vibrant sense of unity vdiich, given 
expression by the congress carried to the Slav peoples 


- 5 - 



0 



V 

throughout the world its message of redoubled efforts 
to crush HITLER and guarr- toe a democratic victory 
for the world. 


Keynote — Production for Victory 

Production and sacrifice wore the keynote motifs of the 
main address of the congress delivered by LEO KRZYCKI. 
Reminding listeners that American Slavs occupy a key 
position in America's war industrial pattern, he called 
for greater efforts this year to turn the scales of 
victory in favor of the democracies. 

How to safeguard American war production and American 
morale took up the following sessions which were ad- 
dressed by Prof. J. J. ZMEHAL, President of the Czecho- 
slovak National Council of America, on fifth-column 
activities and measures to be taker, against them; FRANK 
f^ISBEY, chairman of the Michigan Defense Savings Pro- 
gram on 'national morale; ELFS&IVER, of the Labor Division 
of the War Production Board and GEORGBi^DDES , Secretary- 
Treasurer, of the Auto Workers Union on problems facing 
labor in the wax industries. These subjects were treated 
in further detail in special panel discussions later. 


10,000 Hear Hon. Paul V. McNutt 

Two thousand plates were served at the banquet tendered 
the delegates and guests by the Michigan Committee of the 
American Slav Congress in the Masonic Temple on April 25. 

But the climax of the congress was a victory rally in 
the Michigan State Fair Coliseum where 10,000 persons 
assembled to hear the Hon. PAUL V. McNUTT, Federal Security 
Administrator and U. S. Government representative to the 
Congress who greeted the delegates and drew thunderclaps 
of applause by his -appeal for "more tanks for TIMOSHENKO”. 
"In this first Slav Congress you have shown the world the 
mire.cle of American unity," he declared. 


j>. message from President ROOSEVELT was received wishing 
the Congress success in its work." 


- 6 - 








Tho following is the Index to Informants mentioned in 
the report of Special Agent CLARENCE E. CLAY, dated November 18, 
1942, at Indianppolis, Indiana, in tlje matter entitled, 

"AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS (All-Slav Congress) INTERNAL SECURITY - 
C", Indianppolis file 100-4006: 



PENDING 


17 - 



t 


nffiODUL BTJH8JKJ 0? HJVBSTIGATIOH WVnwU 

Ori gin PITTSBURGH* PA* Pittsburg h Tile S lQC?g^4 

MgSe at 'Sate i Period Made by ” r 

PITTSBURGH, PA* ‘11-5-43 > 3-9, 14, 83* 5-31? 6-3 j JOHN X. JEANS 

■ ! - ‘ 1 7-6: 8-14, 18; 10-10, 11 J . 


Title’ /p 

^AMERICAN SLAV CONOBESS (All Slav Congress) 

.iLL^ORHATit^ 

HraE^l^^SU^^^ASSIFIED l 


Character 

internal security - c 


PiWISE, 


Synopsis 


AMERICAN SUV CONGRESS has no formal organ iza- 
f\ tion in Pittsburgh area; activities, are oaf- , Uly 
A ried on by BUIS S.^tlNTHER, STEPHSkfel^. JR*, 

'both off ioers of national organitatum of Mr / ^ / uUM • 

>' PBICAN SUV CONGRESS, and leaders of various 
-Slavic organizations in Pittsburgh* Informants 


4 'Pj£ 



Approi 


f :T* •^■[♦l«TTfrM| 7 i 7 a vlV*l S^*T^*ii n 


alien communist newspaper* 
active group in local AJffiRlC^I SUV CCNGHBSS* 
Investigation tefleotsV^^Hnas used Cote*'" 
mnnist connections for ^^^^^Ttical advan- *\ 
tage, although neither con- 
sidered Communis tically^BcJi^oll^^omttunist . 
elsaent active in plans for AMBHlCiir SLAV_ UL 
CCBGRSSS to he held in Pittsburgh in 194ljj u£) 
This Congress was postponed for Detroit meet- 
ing because of quarreling between Croat ians t . 
and Seype* Board of directors of National 
Commit tee set out* Diet of delegates who . 
are known Sr sufpected. Communists who attend- 
ed Detroit Congress frq^ittstfurgp set outi 
Ingest number being members ofvCroatian Fra- 


V 


Bureau v i-< 
[ t e* E^im^re 1 - < 
8 - Boston ., . 4-1 

8 - Chicago 
8 - Cincinnati 
3 — - Cleveland 
3 - Detroit j 

3 - Newark ^ 

8 - New Haven 
8 - tew VorkiCity 
2 - Philadelphia 
8 - San Francises 
8 - Washington Field 


1 - ONI Pittsburgh ^ 

l - M nuttnwh Ctos® 

4 - Pittsburgh . Decja* 


>e- v . 


r w* w 




60 ^ 


If* 


PG #100-3674 



started calling him down for connecting his name with that of Communism* 



[ advised that he knew that 

was running the labor end. of his campaign, and that if he 
name linked with Communists he shouldn't associat^with them* 
advised that during the ensuing conversation^^^^^p admitted 
wa^numing the labor end of his campaign, aiSWnawie had given 
tofljB^^Hon the occasion of his announcing his candidacy* 



support 


Confidential Informant 
the infiltration of un-American elements into 
and corroborated the information furnished 


i^^Hwas questioned regarding 
ito^e AMERICAiy^jyjCWGHESS, 




It should be noted that Confidential Informant! 
advised that the national organization of the AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 
no control with the various state organizations, such as the New York State 
and the Michigan State groups of the AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS* 


i 


bZ 

t>7C 

bib 

It 


pH 

CONGRESS. 


ade available the current listing of officers of 
the AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS* The national officers, and the national vice- 
presidents are not being set out here, inasmuch as the correct list is set 
out in referenced report of Special Agent A* ROBERT SWANSON, dated 3-16-43 
at New York City. 

The following are the names and addresses and organizar- 
tional connections of the National Board of Directors of the AMERICAN SLAV 
CONGRESS: 





i 
























{ 


PG #100-3674 




The Newark Field Division will make a preliminary inves- 
tigation of these officers by checking its indices, and interrogating Communist 
informants. If such preliminary check indicates Communist activity on the part 
of such officers, their activities as affects the AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS, should 
be thoroughly investigated and reported herein. 

THE NEW HAVEN FIELD DIVISION 

0 / * AT BRIDGEPORT . CONNECTICUT 



Will ascertain the activities teLd on "All-Slav Sunday", 
June 21 , 1942. 

Will ascertain the ertent of Communist control of the 
local offices of the AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS, if such have been established, 
and in the organizations of which it is composed. 

THE NEW YOBK FIELD DIVISION 

Will check the names of the delegates from New York to 
the Detroit Congress of April 25, 1942, with the indices, to ascertain if any 
of the delegates have previously beon reported as Communists or as having been 
affiliatod with Communist organizations. 

q] Will keep in touch with confidential informants to 

/ y ascertain further activities of Subject orgai ization. 

The following individuals are officers of the National 
Organization of the AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS, residing in the New York Field 
Division: j 





osmi 

. ■ ■ \ ■ i ’i i 


\rv 


- 22 - 




! 


i 



PG #100-3674 



The New York Office will make a preliminary investigation 
as to such officers by checking the indices and interrogating Communist inform- 
ants. If such preliminary check indicates Communist activity on the part of such 
officers, their activities as affects the .AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS should he thor- 
oughly investigated and reported herein. 

THE PHILADELPHIA FIELD DIVISION 


* * AT PHILADELPHIA . PA. 

Will ascertain the extent of Communist control in local 
offices of the AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS and in organizations sending delegates to 
the AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS. 

THE SAN FRANCISCO FIELD DIVISION 


* AT SAN FRANCISCO . CALIFORNIA 


Through appropriate sources of information, will con- 
tinue its contact vrith those All-Slav organizations in the San Francisco Bay 
Area which are known to subscribe to the platform of the Detroit Congress. 


the activities of 
in July of 1942. 


Through discreet investigation will endeavor to ascertain 
the All-Slavic^Second Front Committee which was established 


Will continue its survey of organized Communist infiltra- 
tion into the Slav community of Northern California. 

THE WASHINGTON FIELD DIVISION 

AT WASHINGTON . D. C. 


170 


Will establish connection betwe en persons and organ! za- 
tions mentioned in the f|^^|H^^|^HH||||^H|H|^Vwith a view to determining 
Communist control there^^suK^^^^HHB^^^^^^fflish relation of the AMERICAN 
SLAV CONGRESS to the Russian government inspired ALL SLAV CONGRESS held in Mos- 
cow. 


Will ascertain the extent of Communist, control of the 
local offices of the AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS, if such have been established, and 
in the organizations of which it is composed. 



-23- 


min 


PG #100*3674 


* 

- CONFIDENTIAL INFORMANTS - 




bl 

bZ 

b7C 


i 


cor byl 

so t out in instant report* 


loyalty 
lehtity is 


Local 


versons 


istant report advised that there is no qiBstion that 
night he unloyal, and that he was hot in any way 
onnunist sympathizer* 


It is also n otec 
stant matter! 
case, at whic 
individual 
he a Communl 


is 

-Bureau, alt 

is! 


^hat prior to being interviewed in in- 
|was interviewed regarding another 
ae h e voluntari ly gave the name of an 
[whom he considered to 



whose identity is known to the 
ugh not in connection with any symbol* 



aeen used by this office as a^ 
formant, and who is known to he reliable*' 



2 








SUBJECT: AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS CASE: INTERNAL SECURITY - C 


S. A.: JOHN E. KEAKE 

DATE: 11/5/43 


TABLE OP CONTENTS 


Al 1ERI CAM- CARPATHIAN- RUSS LAM COUNCIL 
AMERICAN SERBIAN PUBLISHING COi'PANY 
AMERICAN YUGOSLA V NATIONAL LEAGUE 



NG SOCIETY 



IAN SECTION 



>RMAN' 

Confidential informant 

CONFIDENTIAL INFORMANT 
CONFIDENTIAL INFORMANT 
CROATIAN FRATERNAL UNIO' 





2 

12 

3 

10 

10 

6 

10 

6 

16 

3 

3 

l6 

9\ 

22 \ 

19 - 

20 

3 , 22 

10 

3 

10 

2, 4 

6, 7 

10 


10 
10 
13, 14 

io , 13 
21 
12 

l, 3, 5, 9, io, li. 12, lU 

l4 

l4 

ll 




•I 


IV 



TEFLA. NCKQI 
TESLA. NoKOLA 




CONGRESS 


UKRANIAN WORKING MEN'S ASSOCIATION 
UNITED AM3P.I GAIT SLAV COUNCIL 
UNITED AMERICAN SLAVS 

UNITED ELECTRICAL AND RADIO MACHINE WORKERS OF AIESRICA 

UNITED MUTE WORKERS 

UNITED RUSSIAN ’JAR RELIEF COMMITTEE 

UNITED SLAV COUNCIL 



3 

22 

9 

19 

2 

11 

l6, 21 
IS 

11 , 12 
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Louis Adamic 
Thomas Bell 
S. Garbuzov 
Abner Green 
E. Konecky 
Aivena Seckar 
Marie Seton 
Lyia Y. Slocum 
M. Vladimirova 
llene Vlabov 
Ella Winter 





Nikola 

TESLA 


Whose daring imagination and concrete accomplishments are among the wonders of our age. 

By PAULINE KLOPACKA 


W HEN Nikola Tesla died in 
January of 1943 in com- 
parative seclusion in a New 
York hotel, he owned no more than 
the few personal possessions that had 
become dear to him during the 86 
years of his life. Yet his estate was 
so fabulous that its value can never 
be truly assessed. And his heirs were 
the men and women of all the world. 

What price can be put on the work 
of a man who brought into being the 
electric powder era? The industrial 
giant that the U. S. is today rests on 
the series of brilliant discoveries and 
inventions in the harnessing and 
transmission of electricity conceived 


by Nikola Tesla, who came to this 
country from the land of the South 
Slavs when he was 28 years of age. 

It was at midnight between July 9 
and 10 in 1856 that a son, Nikola, 
was born to the Rev. Milutin Tesla 
and Djouka, his wife, in the little 
Serbian village of Smiljan, in the 
province of Lika. Now a part of 
Yugoslavia, it was at that time under 
Austro-Hungarian rule. 

Tesla’s father, a Serb, w r as a priest 
of the Greek Church, and his mother 
of a distinguished Serbian family, 
came from a long line of inventors. 
Both father and mother gave to the 
child a valuable heritage and culture 


developed and passed on by ancestral 
families that had been community 
leaders for many generations. 

It was at first planned that the son 
prepare for the priesthood but Nikola 
would have none of this. Physics and 
mathematics fascinated him. He 
would be a teacher of these favorite 
subjects. But then he switched to elec- 
trical engineering and at the age oi 
25 a graduate of Prague University — 
earlier training had been obtained 
at the Graz Polytechnic in Austria — 
he was set for his first job. 

At that time the American Tele- 
phone System w r as brought to Europe 
and an installation set up in Buda- 
pest, where Tesla was a successful 
applicant for a position. 

T hree years later, in 1884, he was 
U. S. bound. There were 4 cents in 
the young immigrant’s pocket when 
he arrived in New York, but that did 
not disturb him. He had the names of 
friends. He would soon get to work. 

His confidence was well founded, 
since within a few years he was 
counted among the ranking scientists 
of the country, his discoveries bring- 
ing in handsome royalties. ; 

It is interesting to note the descrip- 
tion of Tesla at this time by his biog- 
rapher, J. J. O’Neill in the book, 
“Prodigal Genius”: “Tesla was a 

3 



Drawings by Alvtna Seckar 




speclacuiar. Ii c ure in New .rk in 
1891. A tall, dark, handsi , well- 
built individual with a flare for wear- 
* ing clothes that gave him an air of 
magnificence, who spoke perfect Eng- 
lish but carried an atmosphere of 
European culture. He was an out- 
standing personality to all who be- 
held him.” One of his colleagues 
described him as “immaculately 
groomed, and of delightful courtesy 
and charm.” 

A review of Tesla’s work is noth- 
ing short of amazing. To quote from 
J. J. O’Neill’s book: 

“It was Tesla's invention of the polyphase 
alternating current system that was directly 
responsible for harnessing Niagara Falls 
and opening th»* modern electric super- 
power era in which electricity is transported 
for hundreds of miles to operate the tens 
of thousands of mass production factories 
of our industrial system. 

“Ever)’ one of the tall, Martian trans- 
mission lines that stalks across the earth and 
whose wires carry electricity to distant cit- 
ies is a monument to Tesla, every dynamo 
and every motor that drives e\ T ery machine 
in the country is a monument to him. 

“He discovered the secret of transmitting 
electric power to the utmost ends of the 
earth without wires and demonstrated his 
system by which power could be drawn 
from the earth anywhere by making a con- 
nection to the ground; he set the entire 
earth in electrical vibration with a genera- 
tor which sprouted lightning that rivaled 
the fiery artillery of the heavens. J t was a 
minor portion of this discovery that he cre- 
ated the modern radio system. He planned 
our broadcasting methods of today 40 
years ago when others saw in the wireless 
only the dot and dash message that might 
save ships in distress. 

“Tesla was an inventor but he was much 
more than a producer of devices. He was 
a discoverer of new principles opening 
many new empires of knowledge which 
even today have been only partly explored. 
In a single burst of invention be created 
the world of power of today. 

“He brought into being our electric power 
era, the rock bottom foundation on which 
the industrial system of the entire world is 
buiided. He gave us our mass production 
system for without his motors and currents 
it could not exist. 

“He gave us every essential of current 
radio. He invented radar 40 years before 
its use in World War II. He gave us our 
modem neon and other forms of gaseous 
tube lighting. He gave us fluorescent light- 
ing. He gave us the high frequency cur- 
rents which are performing their electronic 
wonders throughout the industrial and med- 
ical world. He gave us remote control by 
wireless." 

Always proud of his national ori- 
gin, Tesla spoke as follows during his 
visit to Belgrade in 1892 in answer to 
a speech of welcome by the city’s 


mayor: “Iherc is something in (Jl 
which is only perhaps illusory . . . 
1 ut if I were to be sufficiently for- 
tunate to bring about at least some 
of my ideas it would be for the bene- 
fit of all humanity. If these hopes 
become one day a reality, my greatest 
joy would spring from the fact that 
this work would be the work of a 
Serb.” 

Tesla dedicated his life to peace, 
to lightening the burden of toil from 
the shoulders of his fellow man. As 
every scientist who so interprets his 
function in society, he was stricken 
when he saw the coming of World 
War II and his inventions being pre- 
pared for destructive purposes. He 
sought desperately to prevent the war 
and made available a device which he 
offered to the world, maintaining that 
it would make any country, no mat- 
ter how small, safe within its bound- 
aries. His offer was rejected. 

But once the war was an accom- 
plished fact, and when the people’s 
armies rose in defense of their na- 
tions in what appeared to be an un- 
eoual fight, he did all he could to 
rally his countrymen to work to the 
limit in the war effort. 

Shortly before his death he w’rote 
as follows to his nephew, M. Sava 
Kosanovic, now Yugoslav Ambassa- 
dor to the U. S.: 

“ President Roosevelt and Donald 
Nelson, Director of our War Produc- 
tion have repeatedly urged the Amer- 
ican people, workers and employers , 
to meet as fully as possible the goals 
established for the production of war 
materials . . . . For that reason, my 
dear brothers and sisters, as the old- 
est Serb, Yugoslav and American in 
the U . S., I am addressing this letter 
to you, asking you to answer the call 
of President Roosevelt . 

“The achievements of our brothers 
in the old country are worthy of the 
spirit which permeates our folklore 
... the fate of the Serbs, Croats and 
Slovenes is inseparable .” 

Tesla was not satisfied with his 
achievements in releasing the earth’s 
energies so that men could work with 
less backbreaking effort and live more 
comfortably. The man who could 


draw up a design for a perfect motor 
was also concerned with drawing up 
a plan for a better world. When 
Tesla read the address of the then 
Vice-President, Henry A. Wallace, on 
The Future of the Common Man, he 
was fired with enthusiasm. The Yugo- 
slav edition of the speech included 
a preface by Nikola Tesla w’ritlen in 
October, 1942: 

“Out of this waT, the greatest since the 
beginning of history, a new world must be 
born, a world that would justify the sacri- 
fices offered by humanity. This new world 
must be a world in which there shall be no 
exploitation of the weak by the strong, of 
the good by the evil; where there will be 
no humiliation of the poor by the violence 
of the rich; where the products of intellect, 
science and art will serve society for the 
betterment and beautification of fife, and not 
individuals for the amassing of wealth. This 
new world shall not be a world of the down- 
trodden and humiliated, but of free men 
and free nations, equal in dignity and re- 
spect for man . . ." 

This man, whose work was so ad- 
vanced of his time that much of it 
still remains unexplored could have 
cmassed millions, but he was so little 
interested in personal gain that to 
save his friend, Mr. Westinghouse, 
from bankruptcy he tore up a con- 
tract which would have brought him 
S12 millions in royalties. Pressed for 
funds during the latter part of his 
life, many of his inventions are lost 
to the world. 

But though he was often short of 
money he would walk over to Herald 
Square and feed the pigeons. It was 
almost a sacred trust, feeding the 
pigeons twice a day. They had been 
his personal responsibility through 
the years, and if he could not be 
there to do the feeding, a Western 
Union messenger boy would be hired 
to do the job in his stead. Often he 
would forget an important engage- 
ment so that he might keep his “date” 
on Herald Square. The pigeons were 
a way to relaxation, a note of warmth 
in an otherwise rigidly disciplined 
life. He had few friends and never 
married, since he felt a scientist must 
keep himself free of personal rela- 
tionships that would be unduly de- 
manding. 

Restless and ea^er to unravel every 
possible unknown to the very end of 

{Continued on page 49) 


‘ 4 . 


- GEO M1LEV 

describes only from the standpo* *)f 
his art. ... In. his attitude ic .d 
various events in the life around him, 
which impress him strongly, he docs 
not lake sides. He does not praise one 
and hurt the other; he merely de- 
scribes everything he sees, describes 
it with the delicate, sweet colors of 
•poetry ” 

Geo was fined 20.000 leva and 
sentenced to one year in prison. He 
could not believe that the court could 
make such a decision. With joking 
reference to the dullness of “their 
Honors,” he left the courtroom be- 
lieving that the decision would never 
be carried out. 

He was right Unable to enforce 
their decision legally, the government 
resorted to illegal means. 

Next day. May 15, 1925, Geo was 
kidnapped from his home and killed 
by underlings of Prime Minister 
Alexander Tzankoff. 

The cultural world of Europe pro- 
tested Geo’s death. Henri Barbusse, of 
France, visited Bulgaria to investigate 
the case. In his book “The Murder- 
ers” he made reference to the circum- 
stances of Geo’s death. Max Rein- 
hardt protested and “regretted the 
loss of a very gifted theater director.” 
Oskar Kokoshka,' in Vienna, recog- 
nized the loss of “a precious critic 
and learned connoisseur of modem 
art” 

Many Bulgarian writers were si- 
lent. Fearing for their lives, they did 
not dare to speak a word for Geo 
Milev or express regret for his death. 
The more courageous of them stated 
that “talent such as Geo’s is bom 
only once in a hundred years,” that 
“He was the most cultured Bulgar- 
ian,” “The most honest and courage- 
ous.” 

T he youth and the common people 
deeply mourned for Geo. They 

K new -they had lost a sincere friend 
^Utapirer. Unable to use the Bul- 
irian printing presses, they copied 
is poem by hand and learned it by 
heart Bulgarian students abroad 
printed it in Paris, and in Belgrade. 
In Prague it was translated into 


TESLA 

{Continued from page 4 I 

his life, he read a paper on the occa- 
sion of his 80ih birthday on the per- 
fection of a tube for atom smashing. 
As if that were not enough, he also 
presented a system of interplanetary 
communication. 

Thus the fragmentary story of the 
life and work of a Yugoslav immi- 
grant who, like so many tens of thou- 
sands of his fellow countrymen, left 
their homeland rather than live as 
subjects w'ithin the Austro-Hungarian 
empire. 

He made a unique contribution to 
his adopted land, so ideally suited to 
the full scope of his genius, “the like 
of which ic all history could prob- 
ably be counted on the fingers of one 
hand.” 

It is to be hoped that just as he 
brought electrification to the U. S. 
in the short span of ten years, his 
adopted country might assist in the 
full electrification of the Balkans, 
reversing its present policy tow r ard 
New Yugoslavia. 


Czech and in Russia into Russian. 

A few courageous young people in 
Bulgaria printed pamphlets about 
Geo. They were promptly tortured 
and imprisoned. 

We, his family, searched for him 
for months, but we never learned 
exactly w’here and how he was killed. 

There were rumors that he had 
been shot in the mountains, that he 
had been burned in the furnace of 
“Public Safety.” These measures 
were used by Bulgarian Fascists long 
before the w r orld knew of Hitler. Both 
stories, however, avowed that his 
spirit was not crushed. 

Geo’s voice wes silenced forever. 
The murderers triumphed, but they 
forgot that he who speaks for the 
freedom of a tormented and deprived 
people does not die. In today’s New* 
Bulgaria, Geo Milev is honored as 
one of her most cherished sons. Geo’s 
poems are celebrated especially by 
the youth of today, the heirs of the 
September Revolution of 1944, which 
fulfilled his prediction of a decade 
before that “September will be May.” 


|| THE AMERICAN SLAV 
COMMITTEE 

of Canton, Ohio 

welcomes the new magazine 

THE SLAVIC AMERICAN 

and projects best wishes for its suc- 
cess. This organ, we know, will be a 
great contribution to the enlighten- 
ment of the homes of American Slavs. 

Greetings to the Second Issue 
of 

THE SLAVIC AMERICAN 

and 

Best Wishes for Continued Success 
in the Coming Year 

ALL SLAVIC COUNCIL OF 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

739 Page Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

GREETINGS FROM 
JIM BALANOFF 

Greetings from Lodge 3052 
American-Russian Fraternal Society, IWO 
1010 East Foss Avenue Flint, Mich. 

Greetings from 
CLUB "YUGO-FORWARD" 

Detroit. Mich. 


THE STANLEY THEATRE 

Presents 

The Best Films from the U-S.S.R. 
NOW! “THE GREAT GLINKA’* 

7th Ave. A 42nd St. New York City 

Best Wishes for Success to 
THE SLAVIC AMERICAN 
American Russian Fraternal Society 
Lodge 3069 

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Efficient Service Since 1919 
LEON BENOFF 
General Insurance Broker 
391 East 149th St., New York 
M El rose 5-0984 

Insurance is cheaper to have than to need 


49 



N 

i>OfU4 NO. 04 


I 


Office M.en . n * dum 


TO 


: Director, FBI 
New York 

SUBJECT: 'AlfER 


AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS; 
INTERNAL SECURITY - C 
(Bufile 100-66671*) 


Xv •' 1 

• UNITED 5 **' GOVERNMENT 

DATE: April 11, I 9 I 49 


/ Enclosed are two copies of the Fall, 191*8 issue of "The 

/ Slavic American", a quarterly, published by the American Slav Congress. 


These are being submitted for information only, not for 
evidence. One copy is being retained in the files of this office. 


Ends. 2 

AS :DC 
100-26200 



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The American Way of Life 


by LOUS ADAMIC 

T HE opening lines of t V let Progres- 
sivi* Partv's platform read: 
“Three years after the end of 
the Second World War the drums 
are heating for a third. Civil liberties 
are being destroyed!. Millions cry out 
for relief from unbearably high prices. 
The American W ay of Life is in clan- 
ger/* 

The Ameriean Wav of Life has 
been the issue in anv Ameriean elec- 
tion ever since 1776. Every voter who 
goes to the polls, votes — intelligently 
or mistaken!) : independent!) or un- 
der the spell of inveterate partisan- 
ship — for one or another concept of 
the American Way of Life. 

Of course, various people, living 
in various circumstances, have vari- 
ous ideas of what constitutes the 
American Wav of Life. I propose 
to state my ideas of it: also I shall 
presume to fit those ideas within the 
frame of the new Progressive Parts 
which must continue to grow from it- 
i iiings in J9I4S. 

As I see the American W ay of Life, 
its principles were born of the Ameri- 
can Revolution. They were won in 
struggle; nothing as * fundamental 
and deep-reaching conies easy. They 
are stated in the Declaration of In- 
dependence and the Constitution of 
the United States. Our job now is 
to perceive what policies and meas- 
ures will safeguard the Way against 
decay and corruption, and will fur- 
ther its growth and evolution to 
meet successfully the problem of 
changing times and new conditions. 
The principles of 1776 are as valid 
as ever, but life is different today 
from what it was then. Fortunate!) 
growth and change are of the very es- 
sence of the American Way. 

The first principle of the American 
W’ay of Life is the right to life itself: 
and this must be safeguarded against 
war on the one hand, and on the 
other against poverty, which in recent 
decades has taken a far heav ier toll 
than any war in which this nation 
has ever so far been involved — 
though the "next war/* if wc permit 
it to be drummed up. will reverse tin- 
story. 


“Why Go to War to Keep 
Others Front Having Their 
Way of Life, "asks Adamic 


The second principle of the Ameri- 
can Way is liberty ... it ha> al- 
ways been our slogan ami our pride. 
But we have long been cautioned 
that its price is eternal vigilance,. and 
we know how to recognize those win* 
have designs on it. 

The third principle of our Wav 
is abundance . When migrants from 
Europe first began to settle here, this 
was a land rich in the gifts of nature: 
and for all that those gifts have been 
abused by ignorance and irresponsi- 
bility. and particularly by exploiter? 
and monopolists. Our resources are 
still great enough — if deforestation 
and erosion are checked in time, and 
if our mineral resources are proper!) 
conserved — to afford abundance, the 
good life, to all the inhabitants of 

These States. 

And a fourth principle of the Amer- 
ican Way is opportunity . 

T HE Progressive Party promises to 
safeguard the right to life by 
avoiding war — always the saddest 
failure of morality and now the po- 
tenial destroyer of human society and 
the globe itself. 

Whether or not we can avoid 
World War III, I don’t know; but 1 
do know' this — that if we doift try 
to avoid it, nothing else is worth try- 


ADAMIC 

Slorenian Amer- 
ican author and 
lecturer , a foremost 
authority on na- 
tional groups , he 
is a prolific writer. 
Among his works 
are My /Satire 
Land . Dinner at 
the White House , 
T neo-Way Passage , 
Nation of Nations . 
My America, lie 
also edits and pub- 
lishes a current affairs bulletin. Trends 
and Tides , issued from his home in 
Milford , New Jersey . 


ing lo do nowadavs. It is futile to 
wonder about the kind of curtains 
you'll hang up in your living-room 
. . . futile to write or read books. !<• 
go to lectures or to school . . . silly 
to worry about being called a Red or 
a Communist, or whatever, or about 
being hauled up before the fantastic 
Un-American Activities Committee 
. . . futile to work at )our job, what- 
ever it may be . . . silly to worry about 
keeping on the good side of whoever 
can take that job away from you. 

War or peace? I don’t know; but 
if we want any sort of future for this 
country, for the rest of the world, 
for ourselves and the Russians, for 
vou and me personally, then we’d 
better w«./k for pear*- . . . stand up 
for peace . . . stand up with our new 
political vehicle, the Progressive Par- 
ty. 

The Progressive Party further pro- 
poses to safeguard the right to life 
by abolishing poverty. Cynics, pressti- 
tutes, and generally people without 
hope and vision say this can’t be 
done. They say Henry Wallace is a 
starry-eyed visionary. We say it can 
he done if we will jealously maintain 
freedom, bear in mind the limitless 
capabilities of Americans, and keep 
the grip of monopoly from arrogating 
the resources that should serve all. 
and if we will insist upon the appli- 
cation of the ever more marvelous 
discoveries and techniques of science 
for the common good. 

The Progressive Party proposes to 
safeguard liberty — not with more 
lip service, but by adhering fully to 
the Constitution, including the Bill of 
Rights and all subsequent amend- 
ments, in all their vitality and integ- 
rity, and by reviving and enhancing 
the programs and formulations of 
Roosevelt's 4 \cw Deal. The Progres- 
sive Party proposes to guard liberty 

( Continued on page 26) 


LOUIS 



o 


The American 1V«j/ 


A HALF HOUR OF MUSIC 

with 

TWO DISTINGUISHED AMERICAN ARTISTS 
OF SLAVIC DESCENT 


in a unique 


Album of Recordings 

Now on Sale 



ZLATKO 

BALOKOVIC 

Violinist 



IVAN 

PETROFF 

Baritone 


By BALOKOVIC 

HYMN TO THE SUN 
CROATIAN RHAPSODY 
FOR ONE MOMENT OF JOY 


Rimsky-Korsakoff 

Lhotka 

Croatian Folk Song 


(Continued from page 5 1 

against that danger which most dis- 
turbed the Founding Fathers — the 
power of the military. And note how 
all these things are inter-related. Lib- 
erty is imperiled by poverty, by mo- 
nopoly, by war. Every measure which 
the new party proposes is a measure 
to safeguard liberty. 

JJ\ abundance, the new party means 
that our rich land — and our skills, 
brought here by immigrants from the 
Old World in the last 300 years — 
shall produce all that is needed to 
make the good life available to every 
law-abiding and industrious man and 
woman here, and their children, re- 
gardless of color, race or religion; 
and that these fruits of enterprise and 
labor shall not be so ill-divided that 
a few are glutted with a surfeit of 
luxuries while many who toil and 
sweat must for reasons beyond their 
control still go “ill-fed, ill-clothed and 
ill-housed.” 

The pioneers who first possessed 
the Atlantic seaboard and later 
pressed westward through the forests 
and the prairies, could win abun- 
dance by strength and industry, by 
the wide swing of the axe. the true 
aim of the flintlock, and the firm 
hand on the plow*. There was op- 
porlunity galore. AJmost any man 
could get land for the asking or for 
a few dollars an acre, and become 


By PETROFF 

LEGEND Bulgarian Folk Song 

PEASANT’S LAMENT Bulgarian Folk Song 

ARIA PRINCE IGOR Borodin 

By BOTH 

SONGS MY MOTHER TAUGHT ME Dvorak 

ELEGIE Masianet 

Prize selections for yoitr library long to be 
cherished and enjoyed 


FOUR RECORDS TO EACH ALBUM 
$4 the Album 

postage prepaid 


USE CONVENIENT ORDER BLANK 


( Continued on page 29 1 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 
205 East 42nd Street 
New York 17, N. Y. 

$4 for album of 4 records 

1 enclose for □ album(s) 

Nam# — 

Address 

City & Zone 

State- 

(Mate checks and money orders 
payable to 

AMERICAN SLAV CONGRESS 



The American Way 

(in independent farmer. A n \ mail 
could sot up a little store in a new 
community and !hvoiiu» a prosperous 
merchant as the town grow. Almost 
any man could start a paper, estab- 
lish a factory or mill, or open a mine, 
and become an industrialist. 

Ibis i> no longer true. Millions of 
square miles ha\e been rendered use- 
less for human use and habitation b> 
irresponsible deforestation and by 
erosion. The number of family farms 
dwindles yearly; every day hundreds 
of indejH'ndent merchants and small 
mining, milling ami manufacturing 
companies are forced out of business 
by the power of monopoly, centered 
in Wall Street. 

The relentless limitation of oppor- 
tunity. the shrinking of abundance 
for millions, the violences done to lib- 
erty in defiance of the Constitution 
and in contempt of the tradition that 
began in 1776. the further threat 
against freedom in the ominous form 
of military rule, the denial of life 
itself to unnumbered victims of pov- 
erty, and the grave threat to all our 
lives in the probability of a war 
waged with atom bomb.- and bacteria 
— these developments, conditions ami 
prospects now imperil the American 
Way of Life. 

The Progressive Party proposes to 
restore and safeguard and extend 
that Way — the emphasis is on the 
word ‘"extend.” Nothing in nature 
stands still, and no more can human 
economic and social and political in- 
stitutions. Change is the key prin- 
ciple of the American Way — growth, 
adaptation, progress. Had it not been 
for that principle, the I SA would 
not exist — we would not now be de- 
bating the decisions made in an 
election: we would still be colonial 
subjects, or we wouldn’t be here at 
all. 

If we remembered more vividly 
what daring it took in 1776 to reject 
monarchy and form a republic, we 
would have less hesitation in reject- 
ing the National Association of Man- 
ufacturers’ notions of “free enter- 
prise." and adopting measures more 
in keeping with today’s facts of life. 
We would nut hesitate to defy the 
greatest power on earth — that of mo- 
nopoly corporations and cartels, 
whose agents have lately seized con- 
trol of the l_ .S. Government. 


iConlinuctf from pn/sc 2<>l 

Under Henry Wallace’s leadership, 
the Progressive Party offers itself as 
a medium through which those who 
love their country and are also in 
favor of their own rightful individual 
interests can express themselves po- 
litically ... in 1 9 19 . . . 1951) . 
in 1952, assuming that the “next war.’ 
n »w being drummed up, won’t destroy 
us all before then. 

Wc know now that we have estab- 
lished a firm foundation for the new 
party under the leadership of Henry 
Wallace and (den Taylor. Person- 
ally. I was not in thi.- campaign only 
in reference to this \ ear's election 
or because I think, as I do think, 
that Henry Wallace is a great Ameri- 
can who should be in the \V bite House 
in this crucial period. In the main. 
1 was in this campaign because, like 
Wallace and Taylor, like many other 
Americans. 1 became convinced that 
neither of the old parties is fit lo deal 
with the profound crisis which is com- 
ing to a climax in these middle years 
of the 20th century. 1 am in this 
movement because I want to dielp 
build a new people’s party that will 
be capable of coping with the crisis 
now converging upon us and th* rest 
of the world. 

T IKE many Americans. 1 am for- 
eign-born; and every once in a 
while I hear or read some remark to 
the effect that I have no right to he 
doing what I am doing — helping the 
growth of a new* party which hopes 
to save the peace. Such remarks 
amuse me. It so happens that I have 
read rather extensively in American 
history, not as taught in most schools, 
but as it really happened; and I am’ 
impressed by this fact — that in all 
crucial or climactic periods in the 
career of this country, the so-called 
foreigners played important roles. 

The Irish and German elements, for 
instance, were the big “foreign” 
groups around 1776. and it was they 
who became the backbone of General 
Washington’s revolutionary army. 
The Irish and German elements also 
furnished the mass support to Thomas 
Jefferson when he started a new part) 
150 years ago. Jefferson did not tri- 
umph immediately’ [ as Wallace 
didn’t); his supporters stood it with 
him until he did (as I hope we will 

( Continued on pap- 30 * 


Greetings From 

MARY ANTONIO 
, BOZO BARANIC 
,-MILO BARANIC 
JOHN BEZEtJ 
PAUL BIAZEVICH 
KAY BEGOVICH 
FLORENCE FERKICH 
GEORGE GELSOVICH 
STEVE HROSTI " 

FRANK KURSOC 
UUBICA LOVRICH 
ANTON PESUSICH 
ERICA PETRAS 
NICK PETRICH 
A. PUJATCKY 
LUCY LJUBENKO 


Lodge 3172, A.R.F.S., 
Sioux City, Iowa 

.PETER ZAKUTONSKY 
* LOUIS KLYM 
MARY KLYM 
HELEN WONSOWIC 
PAUL ROMANOV 
-MARY ROMANO/ 

BRANCH No. H&EMKO ASS’N. 

- GARY. IND. 

BRANCH No. 3295, IWO. v CAR- 
PATHO-RUSSIANS. GARY. IND. 
MILLIE KLYM 
MICHAEL KLYM 
ANNA SAMOZKA 
WALTER IVANZOWICZ 


A.S.C. of Newark, N. J. 

JOHN J. KASKEVICH, M.D. 

530 Summer Ave., Newark 

JOHN BENKO 
JOHN DOLINAJEC 
MICHAEL DROBAN 
--STEVEN DZUROSKA 
STEPHEN HRUSKA 
TILLY JANOVITZ 
MICHAEL KOLARIK 
. STEFAN LACKO 
JOSEPH MATEJKA 
MICHAEL MATEJKA 
JOSEPH MEDVECKY 
'IMRO RIBAR 
SHEPERO SHOE STORE 
. MATEJ STROMKO 
STEFA TAL 
JOSEPH TURZA 
FRANK ZAVARTKAJ 
JOSEPH ZILINEK 


20 




Delegate § join in singing the National Anthem . 

The American Way ( Continued from page 29) 


with Wallace). The same was true 
again in the period of Andrew Jack- 
son, when American democracy took 
another long step forward. When 
Lincoln came along and started a new 
party, his most steadfast backing 
came from the numerous new-immi- 
grant groups — Germans, Finns, Poles. 
Scandinavians and others. 

This was quite natural. As new- 
comers who came here seeking lib- 
erty. abundance and opportunity, 
they had a more acute sense of what 
America professed, and they took 
American principle? more seriously 
than many of the old-line Americans 
who had begun to be matter-of-fact, 
if not smug, about the country. As 
newcomers, they were somewhat out- 
side the mainstream of American life. 
By going behind the cause of Wash- 
ington, Jefferson, Jackson and Lin- 
coln, they became part of the main- 
stream. They promoted themselves 
from second-class citizens to first- 
class. It was Americanization at its 
very best. It made history, it enriched 
the traditions, it integrated the new 
Americans into the country as a 
whole. 

And it is quite natural, and very 
fortunate, that many of us in the 
new-immigrant groups have joined 
with many old-line Negro Americans, 
with many white Americans of the 
earlier immigration waves, with Hen- 
ry Wallace, in this movement to form 
a new party and make it competent to 
deal with the complex problems loom- 
ing before us. Many of us Slavic 
Americans already in 1946 and early 
in 1947, sensed that Henry Wallace 
was right, and we became part of the 
growing impulse to form a new parl\. 


Regardless of what some of our oppo- 
nents have said, this fact is strictly 
and wonderfully in the American tra- 
dition. It is part of the Americaniza- 
tion process. It is according to the 
American Way. We are promoting 
ourselves from second-class to first- 
class citizenship. This is resented by 
some of the Americans of the older 
strains, the self-styled standard Amer- 
icans; but don’t let that worry you too 
much. They, too, are being American- 
ized or re-Americanized as you as- 
sume your full rights and duties of 
citizenship. Americanism has its 
standards, to be sure; very high 
standards; but it is not anything rigid 
or dead; it is alive, vital, open to 
change and enrichment. 

Slavic Americans are part of the 
whole immense American dynamic 
which is as yet little understood, and 
is full of promises and dangers. By 
coming here, we of the new immigra- 
tion greatly complicated the Ameri- 
can civilization as it was. say, 90 or 
100 years ago. Most Slavic immi- 
grants became workers in the great 
industries, and now their energy is 
integral with the American scene as 
a whole. Most immigrants in the last 
100 years or so worked hard, many 
of them too hard at too little pay, and 
helped to create a complex industrial 
machine which, lest it overwhelm us, 
now needs intelligent handling and 
control. It is our duty to take an ac- 
tive interest in finding an approach 
to the immense industrial, economic 
and social problems facing us; for. 
let me repeat, our coming here and 
our labors in the last several decades 
have helped to create these problems. 

Most of us who came over were 


ordinary people. But in the new T im- 
migration waves were also some ex- 
traordinary human beings. There 
was, for instance, a man of genius, 
Nikola .Tesla. His numerous inven- 
tions now are one of the most impor- 
tant factors in the immense American 
industrial scheme which throbs with 
the high promises that pulsated 
through Tesla’s brain, but which are 
also full of dangers. Personally, as 
one who happens to be proud of be- 
ing of the same background as was 
Tesla. I feel it is my special duty to 
help do what is necessary to insure 
that Tesla’s work, as well as the work 
of ordinary men and women, will 
go into the fulfillment of promises in 
our American Tkay of Life, rather 
than contribute to the catastrophe 
now threatening. 

I N 1942, Henry Wallace made his 
famous speech on “The Century 
of the Common Man.” Nikola Tesla, 
who was a very uncommon man, pub- 
licly endorsed that speech in glowing 
terms. And I think that 1 speak not 
only for myself, but also for Tesla, 
when l assert that the American Way 
of Life is not the way of incredibly 
greedy monopoly profits and prohibi- 
tive prices for the necessities of life. 
Look at this picture: Millions of men 
in their best years who fought and 
suffered, many of whom will carry 
greater or lesser disabilities to their 
graves — veterans to whom we said 
“Nothing is too good for you” — are 
unable to secure homes of minimum 
decency and convenience. Their fami- 
lies cannot be adequately fed with 
meat at 7()f to SL20 a pound. What- 
ever wage increases they may secure 

I C.onlinueil on jnillf 32 ' 


30 


comments 
from our readers 


Dear Editor: 

Our small club of eight members, from a small 
mining community in Pennsylvania, until re- 
cently was known as the Rural Ridge Busy Knit- 
ters Club. We are now a chapter of the Con- 
gress of American Women. 

We have only fifteen dollars in our treasure 
and out of this we are sending you SIO, be- 
cause of our desire to contribute to the work you 
are doing. 

May it help in some wav towards The Slavic 
American's fight for freedom and democracy. 

AnnoStominac, Pres. 

Anne K ondrick, Sec'y . 

Julia Pukavina , Treas. 

Rural Ridge , Pa. 


Dear Editor: 

I send you post haste my renewal subscription 
for The Slavic American . 

In all sincerity — keep up the good work for 
you are doing an excellent job in the struggle 
against fascism. 

I never miss an issue. 

Rev. Eliot IP kite 
New York , A'. Y. 

Dear Editor: 

How about more profiles on Slavic American 
writers and scientists like Nikola Tesla? The 
field for this type of material is virtually endless. 

Anton Markulic 
Los Angeles. Calij. 

(See page 


Tho American * Continued from papr rid • 


through their unions, increased living 
costs still stay one jump ahead of 
them. 

We of the Progressive Party say 
this is not the American Way of Life. 
And “we*’ includes great numbers of 
ex-GIs and young workers, old-stock 
Americans and immigrants: Ameri- 
cans of all breeds and backgrounds. 

If all Americans are employed at 
better than mere-existence wages or 
are engaged in business or profes- 
sional activities at a reasonable com- 
pensation; if all Americans are well 
clothed and fed: if all Americans 
are secure instead of uncertain and 
worried, as the majority are today, 
there will be no war. The Hearsts, 
Peglers, Forrestals and Bullitts won’t 
get to first base in trying to prop- 
agandize us into fear and hate of 
other countrie> which are emerging 
out of backwardness and. because of 
their different historic experiences, 
are attempting a different system for 
providing benefits and opportunities 
for their citizens. 


W hy go to war to keep others from 
having their way of life? We in the 
W allace movement, in the Progressive 
Party, insist on peace in order to keep 
tiie American Way of Life. If our ap- 
proach prevails in time, there will be 
no war and Russia will be no danger 
to America, to the American Way of 
Life. The chief danger to this coun- 
try and to our institutions under the 
Constitution lies in our present high- 
level politicians and wire-pullers who 
have raised the cry of Communism 
and of the Russian menace as a 
smokescreen to neutralize any pos* 
sible militancy on the part of labor, 
to scare us in the new-immigrant 
groups, to frighten the Negroes, and 
to confuse the people generally so 
they won’t be able to figure out who 
or what is responsible for high living 
costs. Henry Wallace clearly means 
what he says; so he and his active 
supporters were smeared, lest too 
many voters vote for him and in their 
own interest. 

The old-line politicians and wire- 


pullers and their propagandists are 
not afraid of Communism, but of 
American democracy and of the 
American people; of the people get- 
ting wise to themselves and demand- 
ing a return to the American Way of 
Life — the Way defined in the Decla- 
ration of Independence and the Con- 
stitution of the l nited States. 

That’s what they are afraid of . . . 
that’s what ne Progressives stand for 
. . . and that’s what will prevail if you 
and I, all of us and all of our neigh- 
bors wherever we come from, do 
everything in our power to build the 
new party that has come into being 
around the personality and political 
philosophy of Henry Wallace. W r e, all 
of us, will have to do all we can in 
this post-election period to make of 
the Progressive Party a party capable 
of saving the country and helping to 
bring about a world in which the 
American Way of Life will include 
not warlike antagonism, but construc- 
tive interest in the ways of life in 
oilier countries. 


w 


FEDERAL BUREAMfOFrhVESTIGATION 

MI nc* *<x 100-27583 MBJ 


Form Ko. 1 

THIS CASE ORIGINATED AT CINCINNATI, OHIO 


RETORT MAOS AT 

nest tork cm 

DATE WHIN MADS 

U/13/43 

PERIOD FOR 

itr/e.TT 

25-28/43 


with aliases * ^ ^ 


retort maos by 

IttRSN-^IIJKDSm 


CHARACTER OR CASE 


SEC BRIT T MATTER - Cm 


SYNOPSIS OF FACTS: 






s ‘ vy ^Bureau latter dated January 21, 1943, reflects that’ g £ c ' 
/ SIVA XESANOVICH an# supposedly" £ g > 
helps finance every Swjbjap newspaper in the U. S r ~~~ 
except "SRBOBRAN", pabliahed'ln Mltsburgh; and 
active among the Serbians inJl^&(j£ was Ihgoslar 
Minister of State and after coming to the U. S. 

. was threatened with violen * ' ' “ 

Che talk and pro-Osman 

V S TTfTT in mu 



wv ifug us Or 

olenc^^/i^^jein^mM. 
goslavia and x^|^^^W!^wrd 




J 


frofesaar in TugoaUrti and iJ P^SUIIU, urltir- 
A v articles for a Cleveland Slovene newspaper and also 


reported to be member of Co mmunist dominated 
• Addre; 

MIC, is' 

’<fly has 

from 


i P 

• R* . 

<§K 

Bureau file #100*118061 , • / ^ r - 

Report of Special Agent mLQI-H, JAHM, JR./ dated 
Jhly 17, 1943 ft Cincinnati, Ohio* 



DETAIISi 


At Mew Tork, 


m. I, • v /?/ 

|0CCLASSI7DBJ0B CfcTT=tf • . - , " 

[s r ^ac/3 p/^Y^aJL^ investigation is predicated upon a request in 



attrovcoano/^J A / //y -SfectAtAeixr 

roRWARDSDt^p oA . INCH am 

. Jv .’*• . DO not write in these spaces - | 

I— y? 

/<M- ///?d6/+-4fe 5 

5T?D 

3D ifc INDKXTD 


s r : coi 

5* Bureau 

4 - Cincinnati (2-IJSA, Dayton) 

„ (#1C 

2 -.New lork <A ' 


(#100-4O83> 

' : G(\ 

1 7 - ... . r? 



7—3041 





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•' ’ : ••••.•; '•-.f . ' iv>.-.*ivA' '•' ’■ — ’ '• *:•; : v 

reference report that indices, of the New Tone 'Office be checked against the 
names of the persona discovered to* be''o«rresponding-Trith;the-snbJect in ' 
Cincinnati* 

SAVaYkdSJlNOVIC H first came to the attention’ of the 
Bureau in January, 1943, alter the death of NIKOLA. TESLA, one of the world's 
outstanding scientists in the electrical field* During his lifetime, TESLA' 
conducted many experiments in connection with the wireless transmission of 
electrical power and Just prior toJhis death, was interested in what is 
commonly called the *f death-ray" . , v -' " . v"^' ' N.. -'V 

The notes and records of TESLA's experiments and formulae,’ 
together with designs of machinery necessary for their operation* were re* 
ported to be among TESLA’s personal effects, after his death. <3Sg? 

It was reported that KDSANOVICH claimed to be a nephew 
of TESLA, and he attempted to secure possession of TESLA's personal effects, 
and hired a private locksmith to gain access to TESLA's possessions* The 
Bureau was interested because of the supposedly vital importance of TESLA's 
Inventions and the desire to keep them out of enemy hands,* as one Informant 
maintains that KDSANOVICH was pro* Axis in his’ sympathies* The matter was later 
handled as an alien eneay, custodial detention matter and no further in* 
restigation conducted by this office* : V ■! 

The Bureau advised by letter of January 21, 1943* that 
its files revealed confidential information concerning NIKOLA TESLA and his 
inventions and advised that one NIC0LA,\TESLA, who might be identical with 
NIKOLA TESLA, made a speech in Springfield, Massachusetts on July 4, 1922 
under the auspices of the friends of Soviet Russia* 

li- > ' r was further advised that one SAVA KDSANOVICH, desr/"':'*'^ 

cribed £3* 'thd’* Minister of Supply, arrived with, other' Yugoslavian Government . . 
Officials at Norfolk, Virginia on September 4, 194171 ffn another instance* fey 
the name o£$AVA Ny KDSANOVICH appe^.ed^axKthe stationery of the CEN TRAL ft r 0 
EASTERN EUROPEAN FLANNB*} BOApD (Cssbhcslovakia, Greece, PoUnd^Tugoslavia). r. 

Tn this letterhead, EQSAROVIck was described as c KA^r^an and 

inister of State far Yugoslavia* ItJfaj stated tlkt^is^6^:)ras inter- 
«*ted in planning for post-war Europe*] fin still another Bureau file, 
wa» disclosed that SAVA KDSANOVICH, £ Serbian, .was a member of one of the 
Tugwlarian minority partiee and when an emergency government to overthrow 
an illiaftce with the Axis was rf o rme d> he wasi includ^ as an official^^^ 

- 2 • 


« » - • 


J 






STAMOARO rORM MO. 64 


If ) 


Office Memorandum • united states government 


TO 


FROM 


UR. T OLSON 


L. B. NICHOLS 



SUBJECT: 


DATE.* Jari* 30 , 1951 

h To lion 

rSSTBKOOK PEOLER *U i ». ^ 





0A‘ 


ft?? 


trco 


Kod|n 

Tr«cjr_ 


Westbrook Fegler called yesterday and said he would 
be in town for'^EKe nextiwo or three days and wanted to see tie* 

I told him I would be glad to see him late yesterday or today 
at his convenience . He is coming in today at_2j30_p*m* *•**■ 



I asked him if there was anything special which would 
require my doing any checking * He stated there were two things he 
wanted to disjcuss * •. 

1. The case of Ni/holc^^gsla and Abraham fa/* Spanel, 
President of International Latex Corporation ~, that Tie "Pqgje r&ggfve 
•a some information to Rogers of the Senate Investigating WAmitfibe 
three or four years ago and Rogers brushed it off statj&gr<thei * — 
witness Pegler wanted to present was unreliable * 



Our files reflect that Nicola Tesla was one of the 
world's outstanding scientists and in fact designed the generators 
installed at Niagara Falls . He died in New York on January 7, 

1943 , and is supposed to have left details and plans for a so- 
called death ray. 3>paft$l and HenrJ^Wallace , according to Pegler, 
tried to get hold of it* 

Our files also/ 6 effect that Colonel Erskine of 
Uilitary Intelligence copied uS^on January 9, 1943 , advising that 
Tesla had died , that Soan e 1 httd communicated with the War Depart- 
ment regarding this death , that Tesla had a nephew named Sava 
j^Kosanovich who had taken possession of Tesla's papers an(f~Spdnel 
xlUmght the papers might be used against our Government* 


We made an immediate inquiry in New York, and the first 
report was that Kosanovich and others entered Tesla's room with the 
aid of a locksmith, broke into a safe containing some of Tesla's 
valuable papers including formula* 

xy 

Coincident with this, on January 8, L* U* C * Smith called 
Ur. Tamm regarding the death of Tesla and Smith stated he was 
talking to the Alien Property Custodian about seizing these items * ' V 


We interviewed Spanel who expressed concern over Tesla's (• 
effects and Spanel stated that Kosanovich had turned over the x 

effects of Tesla to the Alien Property Custodian* Spanel further 
stated the day before Tesla died, he tried 
the War Department to make available certa^upq^ 

RECORDED • tir 



o get in touch ipi t th^.^^,/Q 


m s 


R94 .If H ir-c? 


EX -8 


INDEXED • 18 






/ 


<[ 


> 


It turned out that Kosanovich at this time was 
secretary of state to the Yugoslav Government in exile in NewjjjL 
York • He later became Ambassador and returned to Yugoslavia lust 
year • We investigated him on various occasions as a possible 
espionage agent • However, there were no overt acts ever developed • 

% 

In 1945, we talked to a Private Bloyce Fitzgerald , 
who stated he had been associated with Tesla, and that the Army 
believed that Tesla's " death ray n is the only defense against 
atom bombs • 


It was very clear we had no responsibility for Tesla's 
effects, that the Alien Property Custodian seized them and we 
learned later that Naval authorities made microfilms of all hie 
papers • / 


Kosanovich communicated with the Bureau on March 29, 

1950, and under date of April 3, 1950, in response to his request 
for the microfilms of the papers of Tesla, who was a relative of 
Kosanovich, we advised Kosanovich that this Bureau had never been 
in possession of Tesla's papers . 

I see in the file there are conflicting reports on 
Kosanovich: some people say hp is a Communist ; others say he is 
not a Communist but is a/Vito opportunist . On one occasion, on 
Decemb^r*^^,1946 , we observed Nathan Gre g or \jfc>tive funster and 
WKtj^^BKKB^in a meeting with Kosanovich in Web York City • 

Senato^VcCarth^furnished the Bureau' five communications 
received from pertained primarily to 

Abj^ahamfSpanel, ^Vn^^^ma^wai^^fcntioned the FBI at length in 
these communications, pointing out that Mr • Foxworth had been 
called in on the Tesla case but was killed shortly thereafter • He 
further stated that he was associated with Fitzgerald and as such 
came in touch with Tesla • He stated the FBI investigated this 
matter but their hands were tied, that there was nothing the FBI 
could do as they had been stopped from a higher level, that 
Harvei^ath.the FBI Agent he dealt with, resigned and requested 
never to discuss the matter with him again, that 
and family to consider and that the last hope was 
Congre ss. These communications were furnished to the Department 

on September 19, 1950 • 

« 

The checks we have made on Spanel reflect allegations 
he is pro-Soviet and others that he is a patriotic American • 


2 


It is significant that Spanel filed suit against King 
Features in 1945 for $6,000 ,000, alleging libel on the pa*'.t l iofi- 
Pegler . ‘ “ 


fllW 9t+* 


We did have an Agent, Harvey E. Rath, who entered on 
duty February 16, 1942, resigned April 5, 1946 • At the tine 

toy business witfi^^^J 
r Avenue, and his reCTaenfife} 
treeTJ~FasT~Urang&Z~ 2fev> Jersey • The file 
indicate that we have ever interviewed Rath on the basis 
allegati ons . 


fJifTiTTil 


does 


I think we should see what specif ics pegler wants • I 
think we can tell hin on the Tesla papers that when they were 
reported to us, the Department stated that the Alien Property 
Custodian was going to seise the papers and that we learned Spanel 
had called the War Department about the papers falling into the 
wrong hands. J think the less we can give Pegler the better as 
i the libel suit night still be pending . Again, he nay be looking 
\for information to jrdblicise Spanel and International Latex . 

\ ^ 7 ler stated - that he wanted to find out something 

who was ordered deported . H^r^^rred to the 
infori^^^^^^^^^ttnished to me last Fall aboutwKjBttQ being in 
S Houston. We made a check on that and foundW^^^Kpad some oil 
foils. 


I will limit anything I furnish him on 
mterial and will go^cnly as far as'needed 


Merest. 


public 
protect the 


>. 


TV. 


& { 



standard rwM no. w 


Office Memo^dum • united sta^i ■ government 


y 


TO 


FROM 


SUBJECT: 


{ 



5> 


Mr. Toleon 


DATE: AugU8t 30, £> ' 

IQ/. A 


bIC, 


INTERNAL secdritt 


u 


Mr. Lyon of the State Department informed Ur, Roach 'that he 
obtained a note from Colonel Grcnbach, Special Intelligence, War Department 
concerning the above mentioned' individual. Mr. Lyoa was of the opinion 
that the information supplied by Colonel Grombach mfy be of interest to 
the Bureau. 



The information as obtained from Colonel 
is quoted as follows* 


by Mr. Lyon T~ ijck, 


I'ff 



RECOMMENDATION 

It is suggested this memorandum be referred to the Internal Security 
Section for its information. 



se 26 n 

< 2*6 » 


• 348245 -/ 

I 

^ Ip J 

^ 'JAN 14 1947 


dj 6 ish/ 


5 ° ^ 


[l-jauwr 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


I, WASHINGTON FIELD SECURI*Y lF3spT|P ? (SipjEriTI 

REPORT MADK AT : I DATE WHEN PERIOD FOR .WHICH MAOS I REPORJ^ADJ^J^^^ "IT. 

. WASHINGTON,: D. C. • ' ^T* 195 ' 5/9, 10,13, 16,26/52 


REPORT MADE AT 



■ 'FOI/PA # . ESPTONA 

APPEAL # _ •• ■•••• - : . ESPIGNA 

! Urj f civii.aot. 

i — — K.n. g XJ 6fe^afe . • ^ — - a£. — _ 

SYNOPSIS OF FACTS: DAT S * > ALr. ^ 


Informllxts acquainted with the subject in . 
^■^describe him as pro-Hto* Subject 
^ ^r^Srterview and signed statement s 
sC<2 . believes he 


when at th 


ve i 


CHARACTER OF CASK 



ESPIONAGE - R 






Jfc&RSI? 


s .being a t' CP Headquarters m 

land says it is possible 








'Wf' <y ■ 

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nd identified his 


pictures from a copy of the annual, but denied 
he knew it was a Communist school. States he 
was never a member of CP, and never involve^! 
a^ionage. Denies BENTLEY allegations, 
also denies BSNTLEY's allegations. 

AGENCYf OSj .GIST Off 4 0 x- 
" A "REG. RE 
U REPTJFORW. 


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DETAILS:’ AT WASHINGTON, D. C. : 



©- Bureau 7lO0W5?T 
1 - San FTancisco ’ (100.-29336)(Info) 
1 - Los Angeles (6$-5203)(Info) 

1 - New York .(65-lU8U2)(Ihfo) 

3 - Washington PLeld (100-19816) 2-. 


propew^Wm * Thii^contidential Vepirt and its conter^j^are 
FBI and are not to be distributed outside v of agency to which' I 

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suDject. He estimated it to be in the fall or winter of 19a 2 'when he 
first met ADAMIC. In the spring of 19li3, a rally was to be held in the 
Slovene Hall on St. Clair Avenue, in Cleveland, Ohio, in an effort to 
obtain funds far Yugoslav relief, and ADAMIC at that time requested the 
subjec^^parttcipatej_Hes^^ie thereafter saw him four or five time 
before of cour 


\ HU! I 


rift: 


er su 


n new xoric a couple of times, and &ls 
in Washington, D. C. In the opinion o 
artist and '’free spirit," and also too g 




av rnoassy receptions held 
ADAMIC was too much an , 
nessman to be a Communist? 


mxwottm i 


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5 SEP 17 1975 


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R.port Form 
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FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION ] J 

- • -■ • -■ • V : \s . / • - */. 


Exporting Omc* 

WASHINGTON FIELD 


Offic# of Origin 

BUREAU 





Washington, D. C. 


% 

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madder 




*v; * 

L '•'.*£ 


ORGANIZATIONS 


REFERENCE 


CC TO: 

KEQ. RSC'D 


Bulet dated 2/1,5/60; V,’ 

Bu airtels dated 2/25 and 3/10/60; 
Seattle airtel dated 2/26/60 ; \ 

Baltimore airtels dated 2/21 and 3/4/60; 
Norfolk airtel dated 3/1/60; y 
San Francisco airtel dated 3/3/60; 

New York airtels dated 2/26, 3/3,4,10/60 
Chicago airtel dated 3/5/60; 

Springfield airtel dated 3/8/60; 

New Haven airtel dated 3/9/60. , Tr - 


ipprorod 


Do not writ# In spec## b#low : 




8BSI 


Ikl 


>p#rty of FBI - This report U loan#d to you by th# FBI, and n#ith#r it content* ar# to b# distributed outaid# t&o^f^Nscy to which locstd. 




> 'JA • 

K17 U. I. GOVERNMENT FEINTING OFFICE* !•»» 


I 












*T Y*-*04 (R«t. 


UNITED STATES D^ARtWEnTOF JUSTIC. 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


Copy to: 


Report of; 
Date: * 


' m 2 8 13 G0 

Field Office File No.* 138- 4085 


■x^--n»--^^<nsnn«0/fice3 Washington, 'D* 
fSSEREVBRSS 9 


Cr.'.TSI 2'I Cr, Z'l v)< Btieou File No.: 138-4457 
AC 5‘ I OK ;■ 


r‘ — — 


Applicant, Pan American Unions 
Washington, D. C. 

Cfcamden LOYALTY OF EMPLOYEES OF THE UNITED NATIONS AND OTHER'! 
INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS * 


Synopsis: 




iain »HQA *jiiuiiW 

S3 


erinea rnrou 


ormer co- workers at 
applicant loyal to U.S. While y em 
doubtedann^^aji±^^Jov^^vbased 
■■H ■■HMv Anotl 


commenl 


lemec 


employ 

LV. nLIZABETH TERRILL BENTL'EY alleged ; th 
[was engag ed in Sovi et espionage. whi ch.hel 
10UCH saidj— attended C£ n] g p t ing s . ; 


Wf 


was, a member _ofvth( 
nterviewecH>nvarious o’C'casionslanJ 



’ Appli cant^has" 
d tespitaage^^^ 


record 

Applic 


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ALL iy?CTI?v\T 
IIEP.T’T 7 
T.7.::. 

G'iVi—.: 


- P - 


2»<!Dy 50 


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s ail ' 


document coati'mi neither recommendations nor conclusions of the FBL It Is the property of the FBI snd Is loaned to your agoncT* 

its contents are not to be distributed outside your agency. 


1 








eft 


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WFO 133-4085 
EDT:mjr 



Wv 

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made contact in New York City with representatives of the ^ 
Royalist government who came as ministers for the Government 
in exile. ^^HH|fedmitted at this time he was interested 
in Yugosla^natcer^ Yugoslav progress in engineering, and 
their advances in equipment. He said he was also desirous 
of making the acquaintance of NIKOLAtTESTa, who was an out- 
standing Yugoslav scientist a rid-oh e ”oF"the founders of 
Y/estinghouse. He said he first learned of the London group 
(Yugoslav government in exile) in the newspapers and, when 
visiting in Mew York City, he visited them in the office which 
Was on Park Avenue, as he recalled. By this means he first 
became acquainted with SAVy U&GSfiTo/ IC^ KOSANOVIC eventually 
became an important official with the^Tito government (being 
Yugoslav Ambassador to the United States ) , and Jfche applicant 



'JOVIC a couple of times in 
matters of Yugoslav relief whicFTwas spons ored 
ADAMIC, and the last-time he saw 



concerning 






i^watfgr 


IS ADA'.: 


eceasea, economist and writer, and 
described by the applicant a 
a Yuqoslav Nat ional w ho made 

he did not se e KOS 
wh e n he saw him in 

MJJJJtoher^n^rc^were staying at that t ime^^KOS ANUV 
Yugo^tav Ambassador to the United States from 1946 to 1950, 
and applicant saw him upon occasion despite the fact he has had 
little con'^^^^^tt^tt^y^^^^^^M^^^sentatives of that govern- 

not a grea^c^^^^^ffffio^^Tu^n^na^considerable respect for _ 
him in many ways. He believes that KOSANOVIC emphasized i to the 
Yugoslav government that he (KOSANOVIC), would be especially 
effective as Ambassador because he was a newphew of TESLA 
(mentioned above) and a friend of Mayor LA GUARDIA^^^^^J^r -j 
influential persons in this country. According to^^^^HHj 0 / 
KOSANOVIC is believed to be in disfavor in Yugoslavi^no^oecause^ 
of an article he wrote in defense of the Yugoslav-Nazi Pact so'me 














eiieves 


us/ty. He has been under attack by theoretic! 
t Party in Yugoslavia for this article. In 
pinion, KOSANOVIC is not a Communist, and h 
t KOSANOVIC is against Marxism. 


e me 


n Yugoslavia 
hands with 
casion whe 


He explaine 
'a 




niBuiti'M 


in Hew YorKeTcoupTe 

times, and also at Yugoslav Enb a s s^^eceo+^n s held in 
Washington, D. C. In the opinion of ^H|H^ADAMIC was too 
much an artist and “free spirit, ,s and als^xoo good a businessman 
to be a Communist. ' t 




■was important 
U.Lt-r 


en 
‘fore 


% 






















Ho* 7 



UUR8 14, 1357 
Dear Friends: 


LmFRpLANBTAP.Y SESSIONS NEWSLETFER 
INTERPLANETARY SESSION NEWSLETTER. 


We have not issued a Newsletter since May 1, 1956 because we had no 
Space news which we could consider authentic. However, now we have some 
good news to pass along to you. 


LECTURE - by George Van Tassel and Dan Fry, in Ballroom of Hotel 
Diplomat, 110 West 43?d Street, New York City, 8 p.m. 

Thursday, June 20, 1957* Donation $1.25* 

George Van Tassel operates the Giant Rock (California) Spaceport and 
Airport and has been host at four annual Spacecraft Conventions. He is 
the author of two books: I Rode A Flying Saucer, and into This World and 
Out Again. He is also the publisher of Proceedings magazine, usually 
Issued monthly. Back Issues, of Proceedings have been reprinted in one 
volume. Address George Van Tassel, P. 0. Box 419, Yucca Valley, 
California. 


Dan Fry is the author of The White Sands Incident. In this book he tells 
the story of a trip which he made in a flying saucer from a desert spot 
on the White Sands Proving Ground in New Mexico to New York City and 
return, in 32 miputes. 

t 

Dan Fry and another gentleman are now enroute to New York by automobile. 
George Van Tassel and Art Aho will arrive in Mr. Aho’s plane. They all 
.plan to be in New York City at Hotel Diplomat on June 17 . They will 
probably be heard next week on Long John’s program on Radio Station WOR, 
from 12 midnight to 5:30 in the morning, nightly except Sunday. 

> 

This letter will not reach you in time to sight flying saucers over New 
York on the night of June 13, from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. But there will 
again be full scale operations of flying saucers over all American areas 
oh July 1. This will be in three phases, as follows: New York areas, 

July 1, 9 a.m.j Washington, D.C.iareas at £:25 general North 

American areas, after 9:25 Aim.; f (tentba& American areas, 9:30 a.m.; 

South American areaB, 9:35 a>|ju '' Se corid phase : Same areas as above, 

beginning at 12 o'clock mid-day, July 1. Third phase ; Full scale 
operations over all American* ar,eas -beginning at 7 o’clock on the evening 
of July 1. The above information haq/bedn supplied by George King, 
editor of Cosmic Voice, 88 ( ^he',Drive; ( Mansions, Fulham Road, London S«W* 

6* Also, please note thatkj$orge King has also published back Issues of 
Cosmic Voice in one volume ’A'grioe '^1.00 plus postage. This Is beyond 
doubt the finest "buy" of saucer messages that we know of. George King 
is considered the best telepathic contact which the space people have, 
although George Van Tassel is the finest we have in America. 


Margaret Storm has been assigned to certain work with the Space People, 
as follows: She is writing a book - Return of the Dove - a story of the 

life of Nikola Tesla, scientist, and the part his Inventions will play 
in the New Age. Much of the data for this book has been supplied to Mrs. 
Storm through transcripts received on the Tesla set, a radio-type 
machine invented by TeBla in 1938 for Interplanetary Communication. 

Tesla died in 1943 and his engineers did not build the Tesla set until 
after his death. It was placed in operation in 1950 and since that time* 
.the Tesla engineers have been in close touch wi th s pace ships. The Space 
~ People have visited the Tesla engineers many times T,and~ have told us that 
Tesla was a Venusian, brought to this plane t| as a baby, _J.n 15567 and left 
with Mr. arid Mr s 7’ Tesla ‘ In^^ ~m ’ " '' *' 

Vogoslavla. 


Ifhat^j’ 


a now 


f 



I) A biography of Tesla was published in 1944. It can prcsr.ti.v • o Nr ; nr . 
?| from your local library or bookstore. It is entitled ProdJ^ . >»*..; .. i 

* John J. O'Neill, then science editor of the New York Herald t'\*. • ne - 
Mr. O'Neill has since died. This book gives no information -at- 
Tesla's connection with the Space People, a fact which was not revealed 
until 1950. The book also gives many wrong impressions of Tesla, 
because Mr. O'Neill's occult knowledge was limited. However, it is well 
worth reading because it- gives much technical information about 
electrical engineering which Mrs. Storm will be obliged to omit in 
her book because she has such, an abundance of material to present. 

It had not been intended to mention Mrs. Storm's work at this time, but 
the public will be offered a "sneak preview" in a small mimeographed 
resume of the book, according to publication arrangements now being 
made. This development came about* unexpectedly because of the ex- 
tremely critical condition of world affairs, engendered by the con- 
tinuance of nuclear tests, and the fact that Mrs. Storm could not 
possibly have the finished book ready for the publishers before July 
30, even with the aid of a small miracle. This material is now being 
presented as a paper before certain California groups where the 
announcement of the Tesla news was received with tremendous enthusiasm. 

Mrs. Storm will present the material to certain small groups in the New 
York area within the next few weeks , and probably Space Groups in other 
sections will also co-operate by offering it to their members . Our 
world situation is not hopeless by any means, although the Space People 
bluntly inform us that as a race we are too "lazy"; spiritually we must 
become more potent if we are to hold this planet together against the 
efforts of the dark forces to blow it to bits. 

50 let us look for the good news. Look. for good news from England where 
the messages of George King have at last reached the scientists, the 
press, and the Queen. Look for good news from Calvin Girvin of 
California, who is one of the best space- contacts in this country. 

\ f* % i 

And look for more good neWSj..at''the Van Tassel -Dan Pry lecture on June 
20. We hope to see all oft'you thei?e. TJ)e ballroom seats about 1200* 
and we must put forward every, effor^'jto- get behind these speakers and 
support them. 

Then on July 1 let us kej&Jjour eye's on the skies l The Space People are 
going to make every effbrt^tjp give all of us a chance to see the ships. 
However., if the military’.useB Jets in large numbers to chase the Space 
Ships, we may not' see them. As citizens you can urge the government to 
be more cordial to our visitors. 

Now for some unpleasant news. This*.. has been transmitted from Mars 
Sector 8, through George King in Loridon. We have to begin paying off 
our karmic debts in the. form of disease, which cannot be abated unless 
we discontinue the nuclear experiments. However, to help all of us 
through the coming period of epidemics the Space People have placed 
four space stations in orbit around the earth. They will start magne- 
tizing the earth at midnight on July 21. Through meditation we can 
absorb these healing rays. The Martians have clearly indicated that 
they are just about "fed up" with our depravity on this planet; 
apparently even Space People can become impatient] 

51 West 81 Street Sincerely, 

New York 24, N.Y. 

TRafalge^ 7 “2000 

CvIonjrI H&7hly 


Margaret and John Storm 




0 


w* INFORMATION CONTAINED 

r 


IN 


13 


UNCLASSIFIED 


LATE . A> N-X Av R V *b\hVty.\*fc. 


& 


MEMORANDUM 




FGXffORTH: 




re: 




,Mr. Donegal* 

Mr. Drayton 
Mr. Thurston 
—Mr. Andorton 
—.Air. Charter# 
..i— .Mr. Chipman 
—Mr. Emrich 

Mr. Htotftns 

Mr. Kirkland 

......Mr. Klamp 

......Mr. Devin 

.—..Mr. It. Lynch 

19h3 «— ..Mr. T. Lynch 

' ..Mr. MaUoy 

.iZ^JJrCab o 

£TMc***^ n 
Mr. Cei/A)4xioLf ] 
....Mr. F' an 
....Mr. Wfand 
....Miss Tate 

Ch*cf CJejrk 

....Property tserk 
—Files 



*a" 


Unknown Subjects 
Equipment, Experiments ani 
Research*' of Nikola Tesla /deceased . 

Espidnage - M. 

, 0 

Mr /A. N. SPANEL, 1136 Fifth Avenue, New York City, in 
■'telephone conversation with the writer during the late evening of J anuary; - 
8, 19lt3, stated that NIKOIA TESIA, who was one of the World's outstanding 
scientists particularly in the electrical field, and vdio had passed away 
on January 7th, 19l»3> at the Hotel New Yorker where he maintained his 
residence, during his lifetime had conducted many experiments in connection 
with the wireless transmission of electrical power and what is commonly 
called the "death ray". Mr. SPANEL further stated that the notes and 
records of TESLA' s experiments and formulae, together. with designs of the. 
machinery necessary to vitalize them, are among TESLA's personal effects 
and that no steps have been taken to preserve them or to keep them from 
falling into the hands of people unfriendly to the war effort of the Allied 
Nations. SPANEL continued by saying that a distant relative of TELSA, a 
person who was intensely disliked by Teisa and who came to the United States 
from Czechoslovakia within the past year, by the name of SAVA KOSANOVICH 
is .taking steps to get possession, of these important documents and plans. - 
Mr. SPANEL believes that there .is a strong likelihood of KOSANOVICH mqking 
this material available to the enemy in the event he is sucdessful. 


SPINEL advised that he is engaged in some kind of governmental 
work connected with the war effort whiclr causes him to spend about five 
days of each week in the Nation's capitolj and because of the connections 
he has made in this capacity he has seen fit to telephonically notify 
G-2 headquarters in Washington, D. C., as well as Mr. BORKIN of the Department 
of Justice in Washington. SPANEL stated that Mr. BORKIN advised him that 
he, BORKUl, would immediately make the information available to the Director 
of the FBI and advised SPANEL to lose no time in taking steps to see to it 
that TEISA' s personal possessions were not disturbed. 


A few minutes after this conversation Mr. SPANEL again tele- 
phonically contacted the writer and advised that he had been in telephone 

communication with Dr. D. LOZADO, one of the advisers to Vice President 

WALLACE. After talking - with LOZADO he, LOZADO, called back to^ jSB&SE L^aaid 
told him that the government was vitally interested in the effects of I. 


particularly those dealing with the wireless transmission of electrical 
energy and the "death ray" and for SPANEL to lose no time in doing all .he, _ \ q/\o 
could to preserve then. ^ 

N. Y. C. 

In the last conversation with the writer SPANEL ac 






0 


Foxrrorth Uea o - Nikol^^sla - Page 2, 


a young man by the name of BLOYCE FITZGEARLD, an electrical engineer, had 
been quite close to TEtSA during his lifetime and in fact was the protegy 
of TELSA. SPANEL said that FITZGEARLD was in New York City and would be 
in contact with him shortly, at which time he would have FITZGEARLD call the 
writer. 


At 10:30 p, m., l/8/b3 Mr. FITZGEARLD telephoned the writer 
and stated that he had a great deal of information about TEISA and his 
personal effects and would like to call at the office and give the writer 
the benefit of his knowledge. 

At midnight, 1/8/U3 FITZGEARLD came to the office and in a 
personal interview with the writer gave the following information: 

Nikola Tesla, a native of Serbia, came to the United States late in the 
nineteenth century. While here he became famous for his electrical 
innovations, inventions and advanced ideas in the engineering field. Tesla 
was the designer of the generators in the Niagra Falls power plant, and 
in fact has his name inscribed on the generators in recognition of the 
fact. To substantuate this FITZGEARLD displayed a great number of old 
newspaper clippings and an album of letters written congratulating Telsa 
on his 7$th anniversary; the letters were from world renowned people, 
principally those in the scientific field. Telsa, by reason of his 
wizardy became a consultant to llarconi, Charles Edison, and many others. 
Telsa* s induction electrical motor was sold by him to Tfestinghouse for 
$ 2 , $ 00 , 000 . 


FITZGEARLD stated that of late years he had become a confident 
of TEISA and knew that TEISA had and was carrying on extensive experiments 
for transmitting electrical power by wireless and with propelling electfcfccal 
rays possessing sufficient power to destroy implements of warfare, such as 
airplanes and submarines. Within the past month TELSA told FITZGEARLD 
that his experiments in this connection had been completed and perfected. 
FITZGEARLD also knows that TELSA has conceived and designed a revolutionary 
type of torpedo which is not presently in use by ainy of the nations; it is 
FITZGEARLD* s belief that this design has not been made available to any 
nation up to the present time. From statements made to FITZGEARLD by 
TEISA he knows that the complete plans, specifications and explanation of 
the basic theories of these things are some place in the personal effects 
of TEISA. FITZGEARLD stated that he knows that there is a working model 
of TEISA* s which cost more than $19,000 to build in a safety deposit box 
of TEISA! s at the Governor Clinton Hotel; and from statements made by TELSA 
FITZGEARLD believes it has to do with the so called ‘’death ray** or the 
wireless transmission of electrical current. 

Li past conversations TELSA has told FITZGEARLD that he has 
some 80 trunks in different places containing manuscripts and plans having 
to do with experiments conducted by him. FITZGEARLD knows that TELSA 


T 


6 


Foxvrorth Memo - Niko Xf sla - Page 3? 


has for several years stored some of his possessions in a warehouse some 
place in New York City. 

Of recent years TEISA became more or less destitute, and for 
the past three or four years the government of Czechoslovakia has been 
paying .him a subsistence of $£00 per month, a part of which was used to 
pay the rental for the warehouse accomodations. 


TEISA residences in New York have been the Pennsylvannia Hotel, 
Governor Clinton Hotel, Waldorf-Astoria Hotel and the New Yorker where he 
led a secluded existence. So far as FITZGEARLD knows TEISA had no real/' 
intimates, nor does he know of any v attorney in whom he'confided . / / 

On January 7, 19l}2/ SAVA KOSANOVICh/gEORGE CLARK, who4s 
in charge of the Museum and Laboratory for RCA, and KENNETH SWEZEY&f 
163 Milton Street, Brooklyn, N. Y, went to TEISA* s rooms in the New Yorker 
and with the assistance of a lock smith broke into a safe which TEISA had 
in his rooms and in which he kept some of his valuable papers, including 
important electrical formulae, designs, etc. These papers were taken from 
the safe. 


FITZGEARLD knows of but two relatives of TELSA, both nephews. 
One is SAVA KOSANOVICH and the other is a man by the name of TRBJEVICH, who 
is presently in a hospital in Chicago, Illinois. The name of the hospital 
was unknown to FITZGEARLD. KOSANOVICH* s address is the Navarro Hotel, 

New York City. 


Y/hen asked if FITZGEARLD was primarily interested in getting 
possession of TEISA* s papers, he stated that he was not; what he wanted ifcas 
for them to be made available to the government of the United States for 
use in the present war. Because, he stated, the so ‘called Death Ray would 
be a deadly weapon in the hands of any power, and the use of the wireless 
transmission of electrical power would make possible the most efficient 
airplanes conceivable, FITZGEARLD* s concern was aroused, he stated, over 
the presence of the two nephews in whom he has no confidence as to their 
loyalty and patriotism to the Allied Nations, -and also because of the pension 
TESLA received from Czechoslovakia he feels that that government may feel that 
it is entitled to any revolutionary ideas TEISA may have had and indited on 
paper. 


FITZGEARLD stated that until three months ago he was working 
with the government in a research capacity at Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, and that presently he is working as a designing engineer with 
the Ordinance Department of ‘the U. S. Army, both in Washington, D. C. and 
New York City. FITZGEARLD promised to relay to this office any further 
information he is able to obtain; but insisted that something must be done 
immediately, because he feels that it may mean a great deal in the war 
effort of the United States. 


Foxworth Memo - Niko 


|esla - Page k» 


< * » 



STTZGEARID indicated that it Tras his intention to contact 
KOSANOVICH on January 9th, 192*2, and suggest to him that he. make 
available to representatives of the U. S. Government for inspection all 
of the personal and private papers and apparatus of TE1SA. 

FITZGEARLD expressed particular concern oyer the model now 
in the safety deposit box at the ‘Governor Cleveland Hotel, and insisted 
that steps be taken by the Government that not- only it, but the other 
technical papers and designs of TESLA, be safeguarded so that, they cannot 
be removed from the country or made .available, to the use of other nations. 

. . . ’ 

FITZGEARLD -was' advised that this matter would receive the 

appropriate attention of the New York Field Division. 


Respectfully submitted 


Fred B. Cornels, 
Special Agent. 


6 6 

^4 Files - New York Office 

FEDERAL BUREAU $F« INVESTIGATION " 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTIG® Record . 

Reforo^u. z' *~ 


T /« 

J . *1 / * 


COMPLAINT FORM' 


Open Casa 
— .No Case 
.Make Fila 


Nl chola Tesla 7) Y 6W, Detective Hickey - HYPD 

Subject*/ Name and Aliases Q ' Name of Complainant 


Room 3327, * 

Eotel New Yorker, Nyc 


Name of Complainant 
/to'/tip j 14 th Squad - West 30 St. 

h a J /iddro as of Ccmplai-tnt 
Pennsylvania 6-2888 


Address of Subject 
Miscellaneous 

Character of Case 


D.O.A. (Death un Ari 


Telephone Number of Complainan 
J$Jb 12:20 a.m. 1/8/43 (Phone) 

Da^o and Time Complaint Received 
Arrival) call at Room 332.7, Hotel 


-l&w Murker iurnei^out to be' Nichola Tesla, noted scientist. It was revealed 
NYFD detectives are going through books and writings in the room, and FBI 
'was' invited to sena agents over no join the search if such action was desired 
It seems Dr. Teslq was a Czecho Slovakian. , Nothing, it was stated, has been 
: i'ound , ' , tb" indicate' the Dr. was engaged in Espionage or other subversive 
activity. v 

— — “ 1 " '' " ' ' T ^ . 

A check of indicies revealed no case file on subject. 


all contained 

* KM/." A; 'HT^TT^T) 

nays 'VVX >>» 


(If additional space needed use reverse side > 


N RSC0X> 2NDF.D BY AC-ENT 


No action 


Lf 


/J-Ajf o- 


tri »■ rr—. ! ..... . 

Open New Case: 

Assign to Agent_ 
Assign to P. D«_ 
Defer — 

Route to Agent — 
No Action Necessary: 
File In — 


Arthur. ... Lu.Diiggan iuj ^ 

/ Spc ioial Agent 

f /Ko F. B. r 


(Itf/WI- 71943"'' 

_or 


r 




PEF:GU 


0 6 

Jirlietral SJurcau nf inursfigatimt 

Jlniirli states department nf Zfmfi$ 
New York - New York 



January 8 , 19 l 0 . 


Mr. Ecasgsa 
*>rayfc£> 
-‘ Mr -Thtcreic22 
..Kp. Andersen 
. v Mr. CJscrtcpg 
Mr. Chlpxaao 
—--Mfi Kmrlch 

lMa Kirkland 
»**»$> 


MEMORANDUM FOR FILE 


RE:* NIKOLA TESLA 



’ -Tkiih. 

^ach 

i^y 

mu« 

6-^e.r/ "ISSSf" 1 

This afternoon Hr. 0*€ONN0R, of the NEW YORK TIMES;*.- m a ” d 
called to invite my attention to the death notice of NIKOLA --TESLAy* 
celebrated inventor, which appeared in the New York Times of—e'Lther*- 
this morning or last night. This article gives in detail a“p~JaB ° A0, Cle! * 
which TESLA was working on at the time of his death. | 

| 

Mr.'OiGonnor stated that TESLA has a nephew, who— isl 
his heir, who is alleged to be friendly to the Axis Powers; 


1 


It was Mr,-*G 46 onnon»s opinion that if such papers exist 
they ought, from the standpoint of national safety, be impounded by 

the United States Government to prevent their being used by others. 

✓ * 


I advised Mr. *0- l Gbnnor that this matter would be 
nr operly handled. 1 * > ’ - 

. i s - Jzj-Iq 3 



P. E. POXWOR 


4r~ 


rt 


JT • £/• ryAf¥VAJLp J 

Assistant Director '"'vP- l* 


hi 111:?, mvr COHTAJliED 

is iv,ujszimi> , 


N 

1— 


JAM 9 1943 





les - New York Offjj^.36 



fi 6 » o - /Z'l / 


'x 


FEDERAL BUREAU, OF INVESTIGATION^ 

No Record 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTIc£ eference£ } - v 
AEOiHH Toen Case 

65- NEW YORK ™™,,,™,-,-'-P§U>asQ 

r ^ Transmit the following Teletype message to: BUREAU 
tfCNKNOTN SUBJECTS; EQUIPUEHT, EXPERIMENTS AND RESEARCH OF NIKSlT^ESIA, 

Hi’-’iT* 

DECEASED; ESPIONAGE - II. NIKOLA TESLA, ONE OF THE WORLD'S OUTSTANDING 
SCIENTISTS IN THE ELECTRICAL FIELD, DIED JANUARY SEVENTH, NINETEEN FORTYr 
THREE AT THE HOTEL HEW YORKER, NE » YORK CITY. DURING HIS LIFETIME, HE CON- 
DUCTED MANY EXPERIMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH THE WIRELESS TRANSMISSION OF 


IP: m 

I 

y mo 

crtl^ 
|c^S5Hl 
<P O M 

r i-»o 

*^5, **/ 

w« XjX O 
H-4 H5 


0 y 


ELECTRICAL POSER AND WHAT IS COMMONLY CALLED THE "DEATH RAY 1 *. ACCORDING 

f 

TO, INFORMATION FURNISHED BY Ai N. SPANEL, ONE ONE THREE SIX FIFTH AVENUE, 

NET* YORK CITY, THE NOTES AND RECORDS OF TESLA'S EXPERIMENTS AND FORMULAE 

TOGETHER WITH DESIGNS OF MACHINERY NECESSARY TO VITALIZE THEM ARE AMONG 

TESLA'S PERSONAL EFFECTS, AND' NO STEPS HAVE BEEN TAKEN TO PRESERVE THEM OR TO KEEP 

THE}! FROM FALLING INTO HANDS OF PEOPLE UNFRIENDLY TO THE WAR EFFORT OF THE 

UNITED NATIONS. ACCORDING TO SPANEL, A DISTANT RELATIVE OF TESLA, NAMED 

SAVA KOSANOVICH, WHO WAS INTENSELY DISLIKED BY TESLA, IS TAKING STEPS TO 

GET POSSESSION OF THESE IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS AND PLAITS. SPANEL BELIEVES 

THAT THERE IS A STRONG LIKELIHOOD THAT KOSANOVICH Y/ILL MAKE THIS MATERIAL 

AVAILABLE TO THE ENEMY. SPANEL ADVISED G TWO HEADQUARTERS. IN WASHINGTON, 

AS WELL AS MR. BORKIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IN WASHINGTON, CONCERNING 

THE ABOVE. SPANEL WAS ALSO IN TELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION WITH DOCTOR D. LOZADO, 

* 

ONE OF THE ADVISORS TO VICE' PRESIDENT WALLACE CONCERNING THIS MATTER, AND 
LOZADO TOLD SPANEL THAT THE GOVERNMENT WAS VITALLY INTERESTED Hi THE EFFECTS 
OF TESLA AND REQUESTED SPANEL TO LOSE NO TIME IN DOING ALL HE COULD TO 
PRESERVE THEM. BLOYCE FITZGEARLD, AN ELECTRICAL ENGINEER WHO HAD BEEN 
QUITE CLOSE TO TESLA DURING HIS LIFETIME, ADVISED THE NEW YORK OFFICE THAT 

ON JANUARY SEVENTH, NINETEEN FORTY-THREE, SAVA KOSANOVICH, GEORGE CLARK, 'V/, 

- Approved: . L— • **/'**■& 

* 



Special Agent i 


Jy_ ft? — /£ ^ 


l 


FD-S6 


9 * 

I** 


6 


AEO:HH 

65- 


S^EDERkh BUREAU OF INVESTIGATI 

* r i 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

y^ork: 

P.2 


JANUARY 9 , 1 9U3 


Transmit the following Teletype message, to: BUREAU 


WHO IS IN CHARGE OF THE MUSEUM AND LABORATORY FOR RCA, AND KENNETH SWEZEY 

0(r 

p. ONE SIX THREE MILTON STREET, BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, WENT TO TESLA* S ROOMS 
IN THE NEW YORKER, AND WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF A LOCKSMITH' BROKE INTO A 
SAFE WHICH TESLA HAD IN HIS ROOMS IN WHICH HE KEPT SOME OF HIS VALUABLE 
PAPERS, INCLUDING IMPORTANT ELECTRICAL FORMUIAE, DESIGNS, ET CETERA. WITHIN 
THE PAST MONTH, TESLA TOLD FITZGEARLD THAT HIS EXPERIMENTS IN CONNECTION 
WITH THE WIRELESS TRANSMISSION OF ELECTRICAL POWER HAD BEEN COMPLETED AND 
PERFECTED/FITZGEARLD ALSO KNOWS THAT TESLA- HAS CONCEIVED AND DESIGNED A 
REVOLUTIONARY TYPE OF TORPEDO WHICH IS NOT PRESENTLY IN USE BY ANY OF THE 
•NATIONS. IT IS FITZGEARLD'S BELIEF THAT THIS DESIGN HAS NOT BEEN MADE 
AVAILABIE TO ANY NATION UP TO THE PRESENT TIME. FROM STATEMENTS MADE TO 
FITZGEARLD BY’ TESLA, HE KNOWS THAT THE COMPLETE PLANS, SPECIFICATIONS AND 
EXPLANATION OF THE BASIC THEORIES OF THESE THINGS ARE SOME PLACE IN THE 
PERSONAL EFFECTS OF TESLA. HE ALSO KNOWS THAT THERE IS A WORKING MODEL 
OF TESLA’S WHICH COST MORE THAN TEN THOUSAND DOLLARS TO BUILD IN A SAFETY 
DEPOSIT BOX BELONGING TO TESLA AT THE GOVERNOR CLINTON HOTEL, AND FITZGEARLD 
BELIEVES THIS MODEL HAS TO DO WITH THE SO-CALLED "DEATH RAY'.' OR THE WIRELESS 


TRANSMISSION OF ELECTRICAL CURRENT. TESLA HAS ALSO TOLD FITZGEARLD IN PAST 
CONVERSATIONS THAT HE HAS SOME EIGHTY TRUNKS IN DIFFERENT PLACES CONTAINING 
TRANSCRIPTS AND PIANS HAVING TO DO WITH EXPERIMENTS CONDUCTED BY HIM. BUREAU 
IS REQUESTED TO ADVISE IMMEDIATELY WHAT, IF ANY, ACTION SHOULD BE TAKEN 
CONCERNING THIS MATTER THE NEW YORK FIELD DIVISION. 

FOXWORTH. 

’ (Dictated 2:15 p.m.j Completed 2:U5 p.m.) 

Approved : Sent M Per 

Special Agent in Charge 




*. * 


TJD:CG 


6 


literal Surratt' n! Inueatigaftott 
NutiriJ States department of 2/n attce 


n 3 


, r _ A CD 

^ ■ i ~» l . . v j. /I ^ J 


New York, New York 
January 11, 19J+3 


f ,r #v ~ v 


MEMORANDUM FOR THE FILE: 


RE: 


tffiSANOVICH 


/('olAfi/oVjcH 


Do^c^jm 

p .,«. Mr. Bratton 
Tlmzftfem 
s . 4 . s .^r, Andor-ron 
Clisatars 
Mr. Chlptaan 
, n «..Mr. C^*fch 
ISLs^in* 

.... Mr. Kirkland 

Klcmp 
.....Mr, Levin 

.... Mr. It. Lynch 

. ?"* T- Lynch 

Mt, KnIJey 
M~. McCabe 
Mr. I IciJwajn 
Mr. Cstholthoff 
Hyaa 
Wiand 
MSss Tate 
...... Chief Clerk 

..... Property Clerk 


\ 


Mr. LITTLE, - of the Bureau, called me today and" 
inquired if we had done anything as yet in connection with 
obtaining the papers and effects of NIKOLA TNESA, a recently 
deceased inventor. T£ Sf.fi. 


I advised Mr. LITTLE that we had not taken any 
action in the matter and Mr. LITTLE suggested that it might 
be well to take the matter, up with the District Attorney 
inasmuch as he felt that /SjflSANOVICH could be charged with 
burglary and should be- taken into custody. Mr. LITTLE 
advised that it was important that we secure the material 
supposedly taken by $2SAN0VICH because if it is as secret 
as it is reported to be, it is vital that none of it gets 
into the newspapers where the enemy will have easy access 
to it . 

In answer to his inquiry, I advised Mr. LITTLE 
it was my opinion that the Surrogate would administer the 
estate of NIKOLA TE5&A.* Mr. LITTLE suggested following 
the same procedure in this matter as w&s taken in the 
LUDY/IG case. He also recommended that a stop be placed on 
the lock box and any other box which the decedent possessed, 
as well as on any material in his premises. 


I advised Mr. LITTLE that would speak to the 
District Attorney informally on the matter— and^erhaps-rrtr-j 
could be handled in this way. Mr. LIT T MUraquesie d— t h&t~he 
be advised of any developments in this ipatterF'. E3. I 



T. JJ DO 
Special A^eji 



arge 


- Mr. KIMBALL 


| ROUTED TO 


bm 


v 







a 


filog - 


SDEBAL bureau of investigation 






UNITED STATES -DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

JANUARY- 



/*-' *»3- 3r4 

A =f.ir= 


NEW YORK, NEW YORK 
Transmit the following Teletype message to: BUREA , 

J 



UNKNOWN SUBJECTS} 


EQUIPMENT, EXPERIMENTS AND RESEARCH OF NIKOLA TESLA, - 
DECEASED} ESPIONAOE - M. TEHX REFERENCE IS MADE TO THE TELETYPE UNDER. 

I - ' 

ABOVE HEADING TO THE BUREAU FROM THIS OFFICE DATED JANUARY NINE LAST-. 

I ; 

INQUIRY DEVELOPS THAT SNBXES TESLA DIED JANUARY EIGHT, RATHER THAN , 


THURSDAY, JANUARY SEVEN, AS STATED IN REFERENCE TELETYPE .j ON THE 
NIGHT OF JANUARY EIGHT, SAVA KOSANOVICH, GEORGE CLARK, AND KENNETH: 
SWEEZEY VISITED TESLA'S HOTEL WITH AREPRESENTATIVE OF SHAWsWALKER CO 




IN ORDER TO OPEN THE SAFE IN THE ROOM OF TESLA. KOSANOVICH LATER 

Hr* 

\ REPORTED TO WALTER GORSUCH, OFFICE OF ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN, 

, / ir * ' i * 


kPE** 


IN ORDER TO SEARCH FOR A WILL 


NEW YORK CITY, THAT HE WENT INTO THE ROOM 

I 

I^ch OF TESLA. KOSANOVICH (AND THE OTHERS MADE THE SEARCH OF THE SAFE HI THE 


l-‘0 
Ll 


f 


o PRESENCE OF THREE ASSISTANT MANAGERS OF HOTEL NEW YORKER AS WELL AS 

W MO 


kit; 


REPRESENTATIVES OF ^YUGOSLAVIAN CONSULATE, IDENTITIES OF LATTER NOT 

; t ' YET KNOWN. AFTER THE SAFE WAS OPENED, SWEEZEY TOOK FROM THE SAFE A 
• v 




BOOK CONTAINING TESTIMONIALS SENT TO TESLA ON THE OCCASION OF HIS SEVENTY- 
FIFTH BIRTHDAY. THIS BOOK WAS ARRANGED FOR TESLA BY SWEEZEY. KOSANOVICH 




TOOK FROM THE ROOM THREE PICTURES OF TESLA, TWO BEING ENLARGED NEWSPAPER 
PICTURES. ACCORDING TO MANAGERS OF HOTEL AND KOSANOVICH HIMSELF, NOTHING 
EISE WAS REMOVED FROM THE ROOM OR SAFE. THE SAFE WAS THEN CLOSED UNDER A 
NEW COMBINATION, WHICH COMBINATION IS NOW IN POSSESSION OF KOSANOVICH. 

ON SATURDAY' AFTERNOON, JANUARY NINE, GORSUCH AND FITZGERALD OF ALIEN 
PROPERTY CONTROL WENT TO HOTEL AND -SEIZED ALL THE PROPERTY OF TESLA, 
CONSISTING OF ABOUT TWO^T^KLOADS OF MATERIAL, SEALED ALL ARTICLES, 


Approved: 


Special Agent in Charge 

£ 


Sent Jj 





Cs vf * - (q tj 



FD-36 

JANUARY Sbc 12, 1?U3 

Transmit the following Teletype message to: BUREAU 

AND TRANSFERRED THEM TO THE MANHATTAN STORAGE AND WAREHOUSE CO. NEW YORK 

WHERE THEY ARE HOW LOCATED. AT THAT TIME THERE WERE ALSO IN THIS WAREHOUSE 

APPROXIMATELY THIRTY BARRELS AND BUNDLES BELONGING TO TESLA WHICH HAD BEEN 

THERE SINCE ABOUT NINETEEN THIRTY FOUR. THESE HAVE ALSO BEEN SEALED AND 

ARe[nOW UNDER ORDERS OF ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN. IN VIEW OF FACT TESLA 

IS X UNITED STATES NATURALIZED CITIZEN, ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN FEELS 

THAT ITS JURISDICTION OVER PROPERTY IS DOUBTFUL BUT FEELS THAT NO OTHER 

AGENCY WILL BE ABLE TO GET TO THIS PROPERTY FOR AT LEAST TWO DAYS./ AFTER 

THAT TIME IT IS POSSIBLE THAT A PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR WIL BE APPOINTED FOR 

THE PROPERTY WHO MAY TAKE THE PROPERTY INT(j f HIS- CUSTODY. TESLA ALSO HAD 

SOME .PROPERTY, ALLEGED BY INFORMANT FITZGERALD IN THIS CASE, TO BE A WORKING 

MODEL OF AN INVENTION IN A SAFE DEPOSIT BOX IN GOVERNOR CLINTON HOTEL IN 

HEW YORK. INQUIRY SHOWS THAT THIS WAS PLACED HERE BY TESLA IN NINETEEN 

THIRTY TWO AS SECURITY FOR FOUR HUNDRED DOLLARS 07/ED HOTEL. THIS BILL IS 

STILL OWED AND HOTEL APPEARS UNWILLING TO RELEASE THIS PROPERTY TO ANYONE 

AT LEAST UNTIL DEBT IS PAID, BUT THIS OFFICE WILL BE ADVISED IF ANYONE 

ATTEMPTS TO PAY BILL AND OBTAIN PROPERTY. CONCERNING TESLA, HOTEL MANAGERS 

REPORT HE WAS VERY ECBENTRIC IF NOT MENTALLY DERANGED DURING PAST TEN YEARS 
£ 

AND IT IS DOUBTFUL IS HE HAS CREATED ANYTHING OF VALUE DURING THAT TIME, 

ALTHO PRIOR TO THAT HE PROBABLY WAS A VERY BRILLIANT INVENTOR. THEREFORE, 

ANY NOTES OF VALUE WERE PROBABLY THOSE MADE PRIOR TO THAT TIME. KOSANOVICH 
IS A NEPHEW OF TESLA WHO DESCRIBES HIMSELF AS FORMERLY QUOTE YUGOSLAV 
MINISTER OF STATE UNQUOTE AND NOW QUOTE PRESIDENT OF EASTERN AND CENTRAL 

Approved: Sent M Per 

Special Agent in Charge 



f: 


fEDBBAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
« * 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

NEOQBK*JUPLYQRK JANUARY 1?,19U3 


Transmit the following Teletype ^message -to: BlfREAU 

PLANNING BOARD REPRESENTING YUGOSLAVIA, CZECHOSLOVAKIA, POLAND AND GREECE. UNQUOTE, 
SWEEZEY IS A WRITER FOR, POPUIAR MECHANICS A ND OTHER PUBLICATIONS WHO IS 
DESIROUS OF PUBLISHI NG A BIO GPAPiiY-OE-JESLA^AND-THERE£OR E_y/OULD LIKE TO 
OBTAIN CONTROL OF HIS NO TES FOR THIS WORK. CLARK IS EMPLOYED BY RCA AND 
WOULD ALSO PROVIDE STORAGE ROOM FOR TESLA'S EFFECTS IN ORDER TO USE THEM 
IN WRITING A BIOGRAPHY. TESLA AT ONE TIME REPORTED TO BE WORKING ON 
EXPERIMENTS FOR YUGOSLAVIAN GOVERNMENT IN EXILE. IT IS DESIRED THAT BUREAU 
ADVISE IMMEDIATELY WHETHER IT IS INTERESTED FURTHER IN THIS PROPERTY FOR 
PURPOSES OF TAKING CONTROL OF IT. SUGGEST THAT, IN VIEW OF FACT THAT THE 
NOTES AND OTHER MATE RIAL WOULD BE HIGHLY TECHNICAL IN CHARACTER AND FOR THAT 
REASON COULD NOT BE REVIEWED EXCEPT BY A TRAINED PERSON THE OFFICE OF 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT MIGHT BE' INTERESTED. 

FOXWORTH 


Approved: 



Special Agent ij_Charge 


Sent M Per 


6 


0 


Uteheral duteau bf Inueatigatton 
•Nttit£fc.§tair0 department nf iJusttee 


TJD:CG 


New York, New York 
January llj., I$k 3 


MEMORANDUM FOR THE FILE: 


V-ilS 

*S?r. F^yton 
^*r. Thurston 
, i fr- At? Person 
.Kr. Charters 
s Mr< rMpman 
.nr; lr h ; 

n.Mr, I;ig*;5a3 

.r:r. I^rMsnd 
.fir- ^ 

T r ~ *\ T,~nch 
. \ V- **J uch 


RE: NIKOLA TESLA 


Mr. LITTLE, of the Bureau, called me on January— 
13, 1943 ^ advised that the above matter was now beihg* 
handled as an alien enemy custodian matter and therefore - 
we should take no further action on it. \ ' 



fr'tvsin 
^®» Vj >o!taolT 
r.fcijr* Ityan 
J?r. Vriftttd 
Tate 

X!i t f CJerk 
..Fxwjjcrty Clerk 


I advised Mr. LITTLE that this office had sent 
out a teletype to- the Bureau in this case on January 13, 
in which the Bureau advised that this office was con- 


templating no further action. 


C $ — / 2* <t- fo 
T. J. DONEGKN : — 



Special .ygenir^na" 


- Mr. KIMBALL 


ail r; r:;mou gctitaiked 

liwSSiy lb* UNCLASSIFIED t •• .. 

DATO A-X'-S VV 


jtarge- 


JAN 1 4 1943 


ROUTED TO 


jf 




•ffS' 

V 



& 


JOHN EDGAR HOOVER 


06 



3-rfcrral Bureau of Inuesftgation 
Umfrh §tates Srparfment nf Jfuatfce 
HJashington, £L <E. 

January 21, 1943 





I J \o± 0 A^>V 



SAC, Kerr York 
Dear Sir* 


Re; / UNKNOWN SUBJECTS j SAVA. 


Jto? 

KOSANI 




BANOVICJJj 


Mr. Donovan 
Mr. Drayton 
......Mr. Thurston 

......Mr* Aode^oa 

Charters 
Cbfpncn 
Eiarich 
iV^nlns 
n^kland 
......Mr. rViap 

..... . . - !>; r ach 
..... P - r '. J^n 

iVkCabd 

. .yy'lt:. IlcSwaln 

/hjvC.Mr. Ostholthoff 


8 


V EXPERIMENTS AND RESEARCH OF NIKOLA TESLA-fi^cMsed) 

. /ir\ T ......Mr. W»an<T ' 


jfUl' ESPIONAGE (II) , 

II , „ I ..Chief Clork 

Reference is made to a teletype dated January 9, 1943, f rOm-the j p Mt y Clcrk 
New York Field Office and to a phone conversation between Mr. J. B. jLittlib’ 

of the Bureau and Assistant Special Agent in Charge Donegan on January-11-, ~ 

1943 . ' ) ............ 


■b 


J 




It was pointed out to‘Mr, Donegan that Sava Kosanovich, George 
Clark and Kenneth Swezey may have committed a burglary violation by entering 
Tesla's rooms after his death and particularly by using a locksmith to get 
into a safe containing seme of Tesla's valuable papers. Mr. Donegan was 
advised this matter should be discreetly discussed -with^he State's Attorney, 
New York City, with a view to locating Kosanpvich and apprehending him on a 
burglary charge, in order to ascertain the nature of the material taken from 
the safe of Nikola Tesla. It was also suggested that the New York Office 
contact the Surrogate Court,, in order that Tesla's effects, as well as tho 
contents of his safety deposit boxes, might not be entered without the presence 
of an Agent, in order that the secrecy of any plans or items essential to 
the conduct of the war or national security might.be preserved. It was stated 
that Kosanovich might possibly make certain material available to the enemy. 


A review of the Bureau files reveals considerable information concern- 
) t ing Nikola Tesla and his inventions and it should be noted t hat one Nicola 
v Y | Tesla, who migjht have been identical T/ith Nikola Tesla, made a speech at the 
J Grange Hall, Springfield, Massachusetts, on .Juno 4, 1922, under the auspices 
f of the Friends of Soviet Russia. * 

V i 

It further appears that Sava Kosanovich may be identical -with an 
individual of the same name, who is a member of the Yugoslavian Government 
in exile. An examination of the files reveals that one Sava Kosanovich, 
described as the Minister of Supply, arrived with other Yugoslavian Government 
officials at Norfolk, Virginia, on September- 4, 1941, on the SS City of 
Exeter, a British ship, from Cape Town en route to the United Kingdom via 
Washington and Canada. 


I 


In another instance the name of Sava N. Kosa novich appea r s, on the 1 
stationery of the Central and Eastern European Planning Board {^Dig^hcjslovakia, 


^VICTORY 



BUY 

united 

•TATES 

SAYTVQS 

>\DS 

AK* 

STAMPS 


♦ -m I 

H 


/XX 9c- ff 


JAN?° " 








* J 



SAC, Neff York - 2 - 

Greece, Poland, Yugoslavia). On this letterhead Kosanovich is described as 
Chairman of the Board and Minister of State for Yugoslavia. It is stated 
that this Board is. interested in “planning for postwar Europe'*. 

In still another file it is disclosed that Sava Kosanovich, a 
Serbian, was a member of one of the Yugoslavian minority parties and when an 
emergency government to overthrow an alliance with the Axis was formed, 
he was included as an official. He is alleged to be a Communist and is said 
to receive $1,250 a month salary from the exiled Yugoslavian Government. He 
and other exiled government officials are stated to use these large salaries 
to finance every Serbian paper in the United States except "Srbobran" published 
at Pittsburgh. 

No record of Kenneth Swezey could be located in the Bureau files 
from the information available. 

¥ 

The foregoing information is being furnished for possible future 
reference in connection with this case and it is desired that the Bureau be 
kept promptly .and currently informed of all developments in this case. 

Very truly yours, 

\ * ^ O 

\ John Edgar Hoover 
\] Director 



the Tesla y coJii : the fnductlon^motgr 


j/ at" w nr^;* v* ? 

, .v,V'-r\, f **<*' •*'-'*“ fV‘‘ " '‘«iV f 

-\. r years;;., x ;cvAi 
y . ^e.Vorld-f^oiK.lnv^tor^wlw 

* - • livedo alon&v was-ffowdf M^j(ln 
$>y{ bed^by.-'a ^malds j&She&called^a 
,* 1 ■' ^‘el^hyMcIanCL -U vvliki 

i. Ijhe-. hotel-management; staged 

■J ' ' Svsbawhjfw^^dsi^r^ttveK 
) iti^as •belleved;a'nephew:ils; : ;irv- 

. ■• JngS lninttie gcltj® but *fcls'-? where* 
• . aboutsiare notiknown/^ s&JV* 
' .•" '* ;Nlk'6!a'TesIasjTas;bom;ln f .Smll- 

. . til At* (n ; ?1 lit* 2. 1 9 <*417(6 


listerias" asnoted :wrifcer, * ora- 

- ’A , j it. 4 1 « WL 


•■* x li}f iCame^Herc4n4W4.^^ k }h \ 

^T^V^&®^;U5'G»^?P61y4 

. technic •Institute"- and' tlie iUnlver- 
^tyiof^m'sue^alt^preparatory 
. :wbrk>' at,the?RealschulesjofcIJka. 

• !and^Carlstad^.'rHe"wmefjto|the 

*Untted5Stafes'ito)1894,'f{andt5be-. 
came a naturalized; citizen'./ ..'f ,’ 
''In>1886¥he3desi^^l"the;farcf: 

”'^Ungc«y»^^^^^AWS; 

he*liivented;-the.-Tesla ; motor.'.and 
d^igneda;plari,for.theitrahsml3* 
£loh' of: altematingicurrent. -t-The 


iwtvv**v«\ ,vv». 1 v»— T .. > 7 "-: 

tributlon by. oscillatory discharges; 
;f- /? wk -high';freduency;.studles;'and. 
« development* ofithe-.tnmWrmlng 

T MUUbearingf .‘hts-inanie 1, occurred 
:. j|l .from-1890~tovl89j;,";Frdm ; ithen 

' l r :upto ; 1900:hlsfdlscoyeHesfand;ln-. 

' ventlons Jncluded : .such'{flelds- and 

appliances VasWwlrel^conmumk 
~ cation, electrical ;‘oscl!!a tl on ;vradl- ; 


power itrahstnissloh' occupied’ most 
- of - his * research i: a f ter^ihatl^He 
worked; -aiuthe' laboratories of 
.Thomas; Edison iaUOrangeAUTJ.T 

V 


^ s 


■»» | 

F. B. i. 


f;Ai" 6 1943 
N: Y. C • 


*.-HEW YORK WORLD TELEGRAM 
JANUARY 8TH, 1943 




wjr o. umm. one cane a a 
, >^*el physician. 

, ^Phe hotel management started 
a search for friends or relatives. 

' It was believed a nephew is liv- * 

*ng in the city but his where- ' 

* fcbouts are not known. 

Nikola Tesla was born In Smll- 
Jan. Yugoslavia. In July, 1859. His 
father, a Greek Orthodox Church \ 
minister, was a noted writer, ora- f 
to;, linguist and mathematician, t 
H: s mother, Georgina Mandic, ?Fas * 
ai Inventor. < ; 

> Came Here in 1894, 1 

Tesla studied at Grate Po&r- 
technic Institute and the Univer- 
sity of Prague after preparatory 

.United States inV1894^>and :be- f 
camera ’ naturalized citizen. \ 1 
I be« designed the arc- f 

lighting system. . Two years later f >TT 
he invented the Tesla motor and t 
i designed ia plan for the transmls- ' ja 
i sion of alternating current. - The 

t following year he presented plans 

1 ?°JL e ]ectrlcal conversion and dis- - 
4 tributlon by oscillatory discharges. 

* His high frequency studies and 
. development of the .transforming U ( s 

; coil bearing his name occurred 
. from 1890 to 1891. Prom, then j 
.> up to 1900 his discoveries arid in- 
ventions included such fields and 
appliances as wireless communi- 
cation, electrical oscillation, .radi- 
ant power and radioactive matter. 

Communications and wireless 
power transmission occupied most 
t)f his research after that. He 1 
worked at the laboratories of 
Thomas Edison at Orange, N. J., rnmmmmmmm 
specializing in motor design. 

Fed Crumbs to Pigeons. - 
v .During recent years Mr. Tesla’ . 
vi/ fiad; been)scen;/butf seldomr recog- 

< . . hlzed, on\ the steps ot^S t:. Patrick's 
‘ * ' Cathedral, , in ; front of thoVPublic 

^ bly £a rrylrig^ji.; bag, - of crumbs 
J .* -which'hetfcd^ * 1 

77 , . ^^^Tcsla*s $only muiteryiinveri- 

. e ,r * tion rwas * a ^method a td-which ihe 
H once alluded *bufcinever : f ully>de- 
) - scribed.; -Ifc* was < a; means : whereby 1 

U'* an .^Penetrable ^'wall^Vof /force^ > 

L k £ 0U L d ~ be xreected; about Va* nation's , 

- borders which would, render help -I 
less ‘any military attack. He dis^ 
closed existence of the plan in 
1934, and said he intended ; ;to 
present it to the Geneva Con- % 
ference. He seldom referred to it 
afterward. - 

,?, 936 . when he was 80. he * 

5 a,d ,il ,s ; orlglnal P>an to Jive to 
be 135 had been changed with 
the repeal of prohibition, and he 
would live to be 150 instead. 

He was decorated by the Yugo- 
slav and Czech governments. He 
wept when he met King Peter* of 
Yugoslavia here last July. 




G 194 
N. Y. C. 


I routed to 


lx 


HEW YORK WORLD TELEGRAM 
JANUARY 8TH, 1943 







gernuplasm; .carilfqr : producing: 

XL*. ..H *1 MAHl/AstAMAni ' f ^ s\ r\ nr-nrnr’ * I 


r pcrhapi/by ^^iP/,^ the .existing andf proces^f or^roduclng:" livery 
? genes? 7 *' P^blr^t^ processes: ^at^electrlcalpXowef'jr the: third 
1, are' operative, according, to Dr# Mc^ is La method^forf |amplifying^this 
£ Clung. " ~ *" forc*e\;Vahd +: thQ - fourth: is* di - new, 

c • Genes - are? known * to/affecUnot methodh/o^^producihg H Va ;tremeH^ 

i • - »-/ ** •-. 1...1 . 1 ;* J ,‘aIaaI m ! 1 f ‘ " mama 1 1 !hm /avaa'H 


v duce J effecU >t_ different, stages/ In gun r qf^he^systemi/ The , „ 

(f embitronlc development.'’ To be sue- forpropeHJng\the hearrv ^tdJUrqMJec-l 
cessfv IL any^ body.* changes ^brought tlvei. accprdinr/td; : lhe; r tfnveijor;1| 
fc about by gen exchanges mustjta.har-, will; aUaln^a potcntial *0 f» 50, O''^ 
iviAntr it** wlffi. IhV^TUtintr^brsian- ’voItsT* .. . - 


fj mohldus^wltfiv the ;exUUng^ organ- voItsT; .. .. 'L , ,* 1 

£ UatlJf and the* environmental con- t 'With/^hJsr enormous ^voUage^he 
2 ; dltioV,: .Therefore; .evolution' has said/, microscopic electrical* parti- 
wz been; a *low;process. ^* /* , - * qles oftmaUerVUlbb^ 

U ^Professor ilcCHung concluded that^ tfreirmIs3lon;of/defensIvevdestruc : . 
a* ittwould^requlre '"much^ more stu dy tlon.jHe; has.be en»lworkihg/on: this 
i n of theVinterfeiationships; between invention; he .added //or; man-years 
* r 1 J *« t r n rhi ' *ri d t b od vs t r U C- And 'has recentlv.'mada’a. numh^rot 


pl&m^withlh’ the:body;of an animal have; to* trust : He^w6uld)suf- ' 
of or p!ant r jmd;aIso r an'uhder3tandlng fer “no; i nterf erenc e • from > qxperts^ \ 
the of > the\ wayl' in, *• whlchy this - J genxv * In^ordlnary .* tl mes rsiich |V'c6nd I-; ^ 
:td plasm , has evolyedjf rom' slmple.bo-, tlon. would veryMikely Interpose fan< < 
ginnings/ ^ - a *; * insuperable-obstacle. : But;times;be-! « 

* out * <- 4 ’ ‘ s> ihg* what .Hhey ; are; ; and : \vith 7 ’ the j 

* m «n Ai*iD‘/»'t ‘ “DV' i. ? nation-. getting 4 Kadyi,to?spend?biUn 
) vfe Ueath'Kay ? - aor'rlaneji ; * Honr for .national? defense, -at:, the * 

d*» <;NSola-.TMl*» l -on.-if-the 4ruly *im8:;ti>no c ^ ; ' 

L great Inventors’ .who celebrsted. his ■ 

™ eigtitydourthibirtbday^ori^July^lOr . 

« h tellsithe^wrlter^thatfJhaJ'-stands •^^^^WtuUma/j.^qu ^ ; 

*:®r. ready?’ to'idl vulga^ tot'the .-^United tlon/aris^^ ; 

{®? Statespovernmentthe secret. of His adylsabla jto take.Mr^TesIa.at'hls 
*W /'telefow/A^th.Kwhlcb-.he.jsaid,’ .wordvand^ commission., Wjp>Xto?go : 
in? airplanV;m6f6w wo'uld;b«'melted:at ahead-.wittetha'.cpnstructlo his 
v, L a dlstance'or250jmiles/so that; an teleforce-plant. ^ 
s'i invls ib] e ; Chinese ; Wal 1 ^ of ; Def e ns 0 J 'SuchaDevIco^Invaluabib?- 
h»'r would^ be;built around4he\country. s ‘ 

against any attempted attack;by an ' A“H* a *v >2,(X)0 ; 000 would ^be relaT 1 
ulv . K - * tivelv.a verv^stnair-sum-A^mnAr^d *■ 


principle embodied in his inventions ■ 

2K relating tb'the'transmisslon^f^lec. impregnaMe l agaiHsTKy air, aftackj. 
^ D1 ® * «A/\s»r <s»»' vo.VHicf 'tnra. frtr but'lt^woula-'also' save : manvj moVe 


-“2ixene>ated from a special plants that Can a i; . No- ma t te h o w/zs t r on g t H 9 y 
rirt mnrfl ‘ than S 2 . 000. 000 defenses; a suIcide’sQuadfoh-ordivft 


- :Xdozen’‘SUch : !plants,“:: located; at through" and, cause- s^icK damago : 
SR strategic' points along the’coastgaqt that^youir^make’UhovCanai^ « 
; D ? cordlngi to" ^Mr.'^TesIa; ^ would y.be usabler»ln--which 'case^burrNaVy 
! wt enough (to defend"* the ^country, might find itself; ;botUed ,lip.: ' ^ 

against/ all -possible rial : attack.** ^Considerjn^Uheeprobab^ J 

,i 5 The: beam'would- melt; any renglne, the ' case; even . if dbe ’ chances were 
Us *. whether Diesel' or *gasolIne : driven ? 100,000 Vto. l/against i Mr; TeslaLthe 


4 ^Blbpenet:at!ng.' ’ ^ % ^ ^ ; {ST^X^^and^ fhatj) 

. vv ^^iifci ^ ha > : ^^ 11 ^ retains:,full vintelle? tual ] 

V £j - ../.r •vigor/the^authorities;In :chari eSotl 

U M The. beam, I *he states,-.involves four .building the'national defense si ould 
* ?j£, new!' Inventions^ twodt^whlch /al- a t;once loo k ; into: the ,m a t ter,.Th q 
ready- havetbeen ^tested.:* /;One^of. sum/is^insignUicahtdompaxddjwlth 
these^is ; a'methodhand^ apparatus tho;magnItude:df lhe : stake> ^ ? 

| e L -r ‘ ^ ^ ‘ ^ -i '■ 




* ‘t 


' M, t ^r>' 


DlcJieral tSuram nf'liTueattgation 
United §fafe0 department of Jfuattce 
New York, New York 


^ o Record $6^* 
piles N. ?• 

■ ' Opep^e 

Cas © 

" "■■ “jiake File 


JJKsIJR 

100 - 


Novembef 23, 1940 


MEMORANDUM FOR THE SPECIAL AGENT. IN CHARGE ’INDEXED 


On September 22,. 1940, Mr. ROBIN VAN ROSEN, 33 
West 8th Street, New York City> telephone Grammercy 5-0277, 
telephoned the New York Office and informed the writer 'that he 
wished to .call his attention to an article which was printed in 
the Sunday "New York Times" of September 22, 1940 on Page D 7,. 
under the section: "Science and Patents - .Education News,/’ the/ 
article being "Science in the News" by WILLIAM A. LAURENCE. 

Mr. VAN EQSEN stated that he particularly wished’ 
to call the attention of' the New York' Office of the Federal 
Bureau or Investigation to that phase of the article relating to 
death ray for planes which refers- to an interview of the in- 
ventor NIKOLA. TESIA.°\ 

He .further advised that he believed that some 
government agents should- interview NIKOLA TESLA relative to 
his death ray invention as- no doubt some agents of foreign 
government would 1 contact Mr. TESLA. 

The clipping referred to by Mr. VAN ROSEN is 
t attached hereto. 

The indices of the New York Office were searched 
with negative results . 


Respectfully submitted. 


INDEXED 


J. J. KEATING 
Special Agent 


ATjj irr~l\TI0N CONTAINED 

r. •;:.«■ is unclassceied 

r \.’. 


S 1 -'- 


Sfetutral Stamm of Inux?3txsatfon 
UnxteiJ States department iif Justice 


H. Y. FILE 

HmORAHDPH FOR THE FILE 


DATE 


3: d/zi/fS 


i ^-.UmSuI- , 

^dMedWbdoJ 


Reference is nade to Bureau communication dated January 29, 1943 to all 
Special Agents in Charge, No. 33, Series 1943, which instructs that every case 
under the Espionage character be reviewed for the purpose of determining' whether 
the case should be continued to be carried under the Espionage character, and if • 
there is not sufficient justification f|or this, case should be carried under 
another character, 

In the reviewing of these cases, the Bureau desires that the following 
ideas be kept in ndndr 

(1) Vfhat are the allegations that the individual subject is an Espionage Agent? 

(2) Vfhat investigative steps have been taken to prove or disprove these allegati< 

(3) Vfhat evidence has been obtained to substantiate the allegations? 

(4) Do the facts warrant that the case be continued under the""Espionage cBaracte; 
. and if so, what investigative steps are contemplated to properly develop 

the case? 

In the reviewing of these cases, consideration should be given to the 
closing of those cases which appear to justify such action. 

The instant case has' been reviewed by the writer .and I .wish- to- state 
that it is improper condition, such as to the removal of stop notices, proper 

serialization, etc,, etc. 

It is the conclusion of the writer that : 

(1) The character of. this- -case -should. _^e. changed; (or remain Espionage ) 

• . from to . . • , , . ■ , • ^because : 


t’.’-V-'-.a ©cussi^ 1 - 
UU-4 “V ,<1^.5® 




In the next report, the character in this case should be so 



, 41 <• f J ] 

* ft 


(over) 

1 

9 

MAR 2 71943. 


\ 

N. Y. C. 

J 

• 

ROUTED TO 1/30^/ 

7L <?0~ Jtf 



\ 


and/or 

(2) This case should be closed because: 


s 


Do the facts require an^mediate.assignmeht'c 


of this case: 


in ot„. 


Agent v?.s .it dictated! H/lO/Ps ^ Xcta * ed as of this review, by what 

- • Date of dictation.-v^^ 


Respectfully submitted, 


i'QV York, r Kov York 


iECtKi Kerch 19, 1943 

cs-icroo 

director, $#3X 

EoJ TJESEO:.^ COIJJBGJSj £A7A KCSAlTOYlCHf 

tesmrji&s aid hs82£<H o? Hieolv kslv 

(Peceaaed)f 

. i&IG&GS, MIS03LLAJ2CHJ3 

Soar Sin 

Eoferenco is Dado to the Bureau letter in. the cbovc-c rationed 
tatter dated January 21, 1043,, inVhich it is stated that it is desired that 
the Bureau; to prpaptly end (currently inf oraod of all developments' id this 
Paso, 

In View of ,& telephone call iron Hr. little of the lurcsi 
to Hr, 9?. & £pac~cn, Assistant Special igent in teorgo of thef ICcv York ’ 
Xffico* dated January 14, 1943, in which Hr. little Stated that the chore- 
captioned patter was how heics handled as an Alien Knecy Custodial leiesUon * 
catter and therefore no farther action should ho token in the natter ty the 
h’ew fork field Iivisi.cn, this case is hoins considered closed in this Cffice, * 
unieea advised to the contrary hy the Bureau at eoae future tino», ! 


Very truly yours, 



0 


0 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


Form No. 1 

THIS CASE ORIGINATED AT 


| 3 f K 3 X, EfflffCK 


n F,LGNO - 5-1010 K3 


RD>ORTMAOEAT 


ro in» 


TrTLe p 5 T 2 .fr ue&lzai i 



PERIOD FOR* 
WHICH MADE 


REPORT MADE BY 

?/i5,is/r4/4 mar e, sstaca 




y/j /9 

awt xz:mn& - vie mh ^ / Vf * 


CHARACTER OF CASE 

ssraH;* 


.SYNOPSIS OF FACTS: 


'XJ2%1 

t*nn$t 


Subjefit, who is the President of 
the Seybiea Xatlonel Co fence Coesittee, 
seat a letter dat a, 4/7/43 through the 
C»S« call* to the Yi-titt, who 1« the Minister 
of State oa dlejoeal of the Cororanent of 
Yugoslavia* A translation of tki* letter 
contains the following atutewentt “If I 
see In the newspaper* any j»r* attack* oa 
oar Serbian Yhifhtljr Che talk Tuth Mitchell 
...I will break all your bones, which Oeraanic 
croat# put into your body*. Subject -was J 
trreetsd by the Efp PP pa 7/12/43 where his 
case va# adjourned until 1/10/44, fact# 
presented to tT'A, 2?53T, who ha# the ease 
under advlseneat and will render a 
decision relative to prosecution la the 
near future. 

Kew fork teletype to the Yufeau, dated Culy Iff, 

1543. 

a$ y w-trftK 


Kr. S*YA XS3AS2YIC3, 812 -Fifth Avenue, STew Tprk 
City, telephone Eo. PSgeat 7-4610, and hi* attorney, 
UASSUr WESSCT, to Past 4?ad Street, hew fork 
City, telerisae KCrrey CiU 2-2087, perstaally appeared at the Eew 
fork Office eai furnished tbs following prepared etatenehti 


APPROVED AND 
FORWARDED- 


Sfxciau AGENT 

J IN CHARGE 


COPIES OF THIS REPORT 

3 - far end 
1 - Cl*, CT' 

/’Ty Sew fork 
(1 - 87 - 377 ) 

cua-. lf! ^ 


_pr f *- 

1 a 


j J A 

r 


DO NOT WRITE IN THESE SPACES 


6 M d fr/) v Eg 


r-'.TXC-T P* *r 

k~h 2 \^ i 


;/ 


* 


* i 


7—2034 






ST 4p$9 , 

4 

<sTiiCTkrtn>r rfl. SKXk xcsAKavicnt, fegjt»a i*3 siss>5^a& eg 

TEV CWWW 07 JTSfirAVIA- A3 TO ?K3 FACTS Iff ftTTr3C?I*3 WtTff- fm ‘APPgSg 

mi t% hs ns wzr.Q to n oy peii>ip mv.nvir?r» growg r? 

^fgmgjAti^M ra^r-s owaiw?? - . .---.' _ -. 


The polity of every isonfer of the United ttatioha, without 
n doubt, first wist t« internal unity and 'unity among the Allies, The 
Jugoslavs ha<« to proadte unity among the Serbs, Croat* end Sloven*** 
vho constitute Jugoslavia, end to ur-e that any internal and personal 
differences he hurled in favor of a Concentrated strong end tilted nation 
against, the Axle* 

Here in Aosrica vhero thorn are mdra than one million 
p arsons of Jugoslav extraction, this tinity 1*-* their first duty toward* America 
for the vaf effort end for repulsing enemy propaganda which is working for 
disunity. The aoBt ordinary means of Axis, propaganda, is the breaking of 
unity and exploiting national, religious and racial differences* The great 
dejority of Anericens of Jugoslav extraction are good and conscientious 
African citi zens* 

Cae saall group ofSerba, calling itself the Serbian. tfatipnal 
fefenep, of Chicago, And the $BJED2?AW paper. Of Httohurgh, began a 
cAspaigh against Unity, a campaign of kate towards Jugoslavia, towards, the 
Croats and Slovenes, etc. At their convention recently, this group passed 
a resolution in which they proclalasd thorn selves, even though they are 
Americans, representative* of Serbdom -and broke all relations with the 
Jugoslav Government in Exile* appealed to King Fetsr to proclaim himself 
king of Serbia, and accepting Hitler end Mussolini terminology, they called 
Jugoslavia *a ryth and a mistake of the Versailles 'fcoace Treaty* • 

It is not hecos8aryto remark how Contrary this id to the 
interest of unity aaong Americans, to the wiahas of the Serbs, Croats and 
Slovens a Vho are to bravely fighting against tho Axis, atod contrary to 
the official stend of the tfaitod States, Croat Britain, J&issia and all 
the Allies. 


Kise y.uth Mitchell is honorary chairman of this organisation 
and the seat active spokesman of its ideas. It is cy duty as a Serb, as a 
Jugoslav, as a sealer- of the Jugoslav Government which overthrew the 
appeaesBant governseat in Jugoslavia, as an anti-fascist, as the leader of 
one of the tost democratic parties in Jugoslavia, to act against this 


Hjdndof pyeiegtftie. 

As to yhat the United Stats things of the *itu*bic»f I ha ret/ 

Rioter blser favis, felrfjctor of the. Office of ^ar .tniormticn, as to his 
opinion Of SSEOJSlWf, which it tb ^o'uthjioca for the Serbian National Befense 
Cjjaalitesj Hr* favis specifically accusobSIIOJ&AH of siting the Hast propa- 
ganda yrogrsa sad dawgirig the vat effort. and the Oqpartcenfc, of justice, t 
the State Xepartaent and the Office of Uar lnfd.ris>tioh have all bean Watching 
this with concern. ’ ' 

Tolloylng te a direct quotation fro* a Jotter written by Elsjar 
Xavia oa Jose 10 th to Sjutuel Verliuich Proeldent. of the Uerb National Hedora- 
tieni ’ 

•for soRf tine* several tranche* Of the United States poVornraent 
including the Office of Yfit Information, the Oepaiftaont of 
Justice, add the Cepartacat, of State, have watched, with concern 
the policies of the ^eerican $rbobtan’* Its violent 
attacks upon all peoples of Croatian extraction and their 
clergy* ite strong anti-Catholic articles, and its yiojocl 
efforts to defend the <vilslingUedich who support* the Heal 
teg la# in Sorbia often have the effect pf aiding the hazi 
carpaigas of intolerance nod rode hate, tend, are dwEsging 
to the American war effort* 

1 Aaericsh jtoity is ipporativo for the successful prosecution . 
pf tie war. !ihe "Has is have boasted, th*t they would set 
Africans, against Auoricane and they are striving to do so* 

, (they have sought for yoar* to set people of Serbian, Croatian- 

and Slovenish extraction against each other* It la the .old 
gaae of divide and conquer.* .The United Nations are striving 
for the strongest possible unity and all .those who are opposed 
tp the Axis*. In Jugoslavia, and in th * United States* we 
spelc tp. unite all people of Serbian. Croatian and Slovenian 
, heritage*. 

When Kieo MitchoJl began writing articles and letter* to the 
American resa whiclwere Sgatnst the •policy Just described by Hlser Cavis 
aa a United States policy, and Which were also against the policy of tko Jugoslav 
Coverhsent for Unity, I wrote a letter to the Herald Iribune on April 6th in 
reply to a particularly damaging article which she had prevdouelywritten to 
the frlbunp on April fed. 

follows the appearance of sy letter in the Herald, tribune, 

J received A filthy Sad threatening letter froa Philip IJafkoVich, who is the 


ft $-1019 


president of th« Yew York branch of tho Serbian Rational Hefense Coasaitiee* 
which 1 b engineering th-oso anti-Jugoslav and antl-Asericaa activities* In 
this letterKsrkitTich sought, ly Oeat&po terrorist tactics, to prevent Be 
tr& writing or tptakiig. to offset the dasuiging effects of tk* Serbian Maticnai 
Yefenee Cousittee'* policies' and activities. 

t therefor* paused the arrest QfHhlHp Markovich ■»»$ 1 vill 
not te laUsiflated V bin or any other cdsbar of any ' group who ’is ccnUclbualy 
pr Unconsciously following the. Rosi line and attesting to preisobd any on# 
section or any one group at 'the expense of the war effort as a ’whole** 

Hr« KS3AK0YICE also fUrnishsd a pfcotoatutio copy of the letter 
and envelop* In which It wee received, together with atranelatioa of the 
letter* These are. telng retained In the Rev York file of this caaa. Ha 
advised that it was necessary to retain the original letter bs cause* ho had, 
had the S’ibje ot arrested ty the Row York City Police Eepartnest sad that ho 
would hate to produce the original letter in the City > ourt. ¥h* envblopo hears 
the printed return cidms Of the iSerbiaa Rational Hefenso Cosraltteo of few 
lork, 43$ Vest 2Srd Sires t» Hew fork Cfty* and was postmarked at d»00 ?«k* 

April (date phlite rated) 1543 at How York City, It is addressed in handwriting 
to Kr. SAVA KO^AHOTICd of 812 Wfth Avenue, Hew York City* The letter la 
dated at Hew York City, April T, !$43* and 1* handwritten. and signed ly YSlXYp 

mwi <a fc ’ ' . . , 

Kr* lOSAKvYICjt furnished the following translation of thin 

letter! 

* Hew York City 

April 7 f 1£43. 

%v a Koaanovich! - . 

Ceraen bastard, if X see in the newspapers any store attack# on our Serbian 
Knightly Chatnik Ruth Kitchell, or if seasons brings to fa aojne written or 
oral attache which X Bight Jja/i overlooked* X will break all your bones* which 
the Oerasaic Croats put into your body;. You rotten dirt who plaints to have 
teen a Cerb end.a Minister - we fay ass what kind of traitors ruled Jugoslavia, 
end where they hive brought her* 1 A» hara in Hew York sad we will nest 
easily if you speak again on lehalf of our people. Who gave you the right 
to spook for the people! You are a dirty bitch, assembling crustbe for the 
benefit of the Cersanic Croats. You are agents of Kltlejr and Mussolini who 
disclose secret Information, from that House of prostitutes, but wait the H.iB.X* 


<U: 


hy 9*x6i9 


MU talc* car» of you soon* So nuch for your knowledge, I as yarning you 
to cease attacking the national Hefense and MissMitchell. So you, you 
pissed On scucv expect to underalnO Jugoslavia as before? Ypu are the 
conspirators who killed, the King, hit you, sous, *ill •pay for it* 1 aa 
watching your steps and what you do and with whom you cooperate* you German* 
you traitor vorye than a coward* You,, your eoapany and. your satellites 
stink* 

Philip Markovich ' 
by bile own beccU H 

•Hr. XC3AH0VICR advised that there was no doubt tut that it was 
M1TOIC3 who had: written, the letter as dur% his arraignment la, the'Hew 
tork Citykdgistratee Court on. July i2* 1943* MHJUJYXCH had dated as though, 
he-sfere pr$ul of haring written th* 

Detective jAteS H* tROUF* assigned to the Special HqUad Ho* 1 
of the Hew York Ojty Police Departaont, ddvieod that ho had arrested PHILIP 
KASKSVICE, who resides at .103 %4t 101st Street* Hew Xprk City, ah July 12, 
1543, charging his with violating ^option Ho* 151 of the How York ^en'al law* 
which 'prohibit} the sending of threatening lAtters* 

detective XD92T stated that subject we? arraigned before Kagi- 
strate Anna Kross in YorkriUe Court on July 12, 1943 and that Kagiatrate 
Xross p arolle i VJfit.OV I CH in custody a* hi® lawyer, EYKAH JC33PH3, and adjourned 
the arraignment until Yrjdey, July 16* 1943* ' 

’ Tima facte were presented to Assistant United States Attorney 

Shoiaas ?» Murphy of the Southern District of How York*. who advised that he 
would decline prosecution, penfing the results ,of the. notion taken, in the Hew 
York City Court, 

CHABI2&S J333HIK1, Court Officer of the Yorkvillo Court, 163 
Hast 67th Street, Hew 'fork City, advised that on July 16, 1943 Magistrate 
Anna Xroes, adjourned the case against the subject- until January 10*. 1944* 

Upon being appraised of the action taken, by the Hew York 
City Court, Assistant United States Attorney Murphy stated that he Was taking 
the case under advisement and would render a decision relative to prosactuion 
in the near fixture* „ 


-^HKDIKa- 


*.6-i 


** 9 - 1019 . 




YC3X mw DIVISION 


_ At flaw York. AW Ifork ~ 
Uattod ^atcj Au^ejr ln tfcia casa. 


Vll 







Z*>k U. S. Court House 
Foley Square 
New York, N. Yi 





/ 




i 

t 

* 


March 9, 1914'. 


1 1 


/, 


Mayor F. H. 
City Hall, 
New York, N 


LaOuardia 
, Y. 




v\ 




v-/ 


a > . 




i- 


Dear Mayor LaOuardia: o 

Reference is made to 

letter dated February JL.^th, addressed to you 
by Sava N. K6sanpvlch[j7%l-2 Central Park Southi,t4 - , 

New York 19, N. Y., regarding Philip, Markovi ch£J '* >'}**■} 
and enclosures which, were handed to me by your , / f T Jt 
secretary. oh February. 24 th. 




A oheck Of the records of 
this office reflected that this matter had been 
called to our attention on July 15, 1943, but 
that.it had previously been reported t o the 
New York City Police Department.- The records 
further reflect that Markovich was arrested by 
the New York City Police Department on July 12, 
1943, charged, with v iolation of Section 551 of 
the Penal Law, sending threatening letters, which 
under the New York law is a misdemeanor. Marko- 
vioh was arraigned before Magistrate Anna Kross, 
Yorkville Court, on July 1 6 , 1943 and the hearings 
have been adjourned to date. Latest inquiry re- 
flects that Magistrate Kross has postponed the 
proceedings in this case hn til September 19> 1944* 

f 

Shortly after the receipt 
at this office of the material in connection with 
this case, the facta on hand were submitted! to 
the office of the United States Attorney fjcje the 
Southern District of New York, with a view pq 
possible prosecution under the Federal Extortion 
Statutes. Prosecution was deollned by reason of 
the fact that the local authorities were hdnjdling 
the case. < 




V 


(I ' f T - 


..t uj , 

1 . 




j 


k » 

A- i 


Mayor LaQuardi a 


In view -of the above, the letter of 
ref ©rente, nentioned above, and the enclosures 
are being returned herewith. 


Sincerely your a > 


B. E. CONROY 

Speoial Agent In Charge. 


Enclosures. 





Adfoess writer at: 

Ucsis. Inst, of Tcdh., 
Cambridge, Kass. 
January 30, 1943. 


>r. ifalter Gcrsuct, 

Alien property Custodian, 

120£?oad*Ey, 

Hew York, flow York. 

W* Sir: 

i 

At youd pcguest. and that of fr. Joseph f. JSing of the 
Washington office of the Alien Property Custodian* I have ex-> 
sained the private papers, writings, -and other property pf tho 
late Sr. UiKola f esla with the view to determining both their 
possible usefulness to this country In its war effort and the 
possible hazard attendant oh their' felling into unfriendly 
hands. 


This examination wc.S naQo at tho. JL'snhdtten Ferehcuse, 

52r,d Street, Hew York City, on January 2o-27, and. included- all 
of the notes rad material in pr. Tesla* s dmedidte possession 
at the tine cf his death 'and now in, the custody of your office, 
per reasons indicated below, no investigation was' rude of material 
in trunks which had r ermine?, untouched ih tho basement of the 
Hew Yorker Hotel for ten yeans prior tp Jr-. Tesla*? death. 


As a result of this examination, it is my considered 
opinion: that there exist dnopg r jv % Tepid *9 papers And possessions- 
no scientific, notes, descriptions of Jdthcrto unrovcslcd* methods 
or devices,, cr actual apparatus which qculd bp .of significant 
value to this country dr mdeh would constitute a hazard irr un- 
friendly hands, I can therefore see no technical e* military 
reason why further custody of the property should, be retained. 


For your f 0 cords, there has been renewed to your office 
a file of various written material by Dr. Tesla which covers 


tnd briefly abstracted in the attachment to this leti< 


i-A 


tr r /'-a H'i7 


L . : 1 

' B L ' 

w/ ci efa 

- N. Y, C« 


| <?V0TFD TO 

ts 



XQ 


- 2 - 


january 30, 1943 


Tt should fee no discredit tb this distinguished engineer and 
scientist .hose noUd contrltations to the eleotriod ert vore 
i»arfo at the beginning- p'f the present century to report that hia 

* ***** P»t ttftee; year* «ent 

primarily of a speculative, philosophical, 'and. soaenhat proao- 
ticnal character— often , concerned alth the producation apd "wire- 
StrsSnL * Ff f -but did not —» 
ab lq principles or methods, for realizing such results. 

tery truly yours. 


• JOHN 0. TRUM?, ' 

• \ Technical -Aide, 

* ♦ " pivisibh. 

( ‘ * - 
i 

^closure. , 

.JQT/O* 


m 


4 




ADSmCTS CF LR, NI«OLA 'TESLA’S WRITINGS 
RETAINED AS EXSIBIX3 
TOR TIP ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTp&AN 


On January 26 end 27, 1943> &n examination was made of the 
technical paper? of fir* Nikola Tesla "which, After hie; decease,, hhd 
bsfcn stored in the Manhattan Warehouse irt New York City. This ex- 
amination was mads for the purpose of determining if any ideas Of 
significant veluo in the present United States "wer effort could Be 
f*und emeng his possessions. Participating in this examination were: 

Hr. John-0, Newington, New York Office of tho Alien property Custodian; 
Hr. Charles J. Redetniemi, Washington' Office of the Alien Property 
CuBtodicnj hr. John G, Trump, Office of Scientific Research arid De- 
velopment, Massachusetts Institute .of Technology, Cambridge, fcassachu- 
settsp Willis George, Office of Naval Intelligence, Third Naval Dis- 
trict} Edtferd Palner, Chief Yeoman, DSNRi John J. Corbett, Chief Yeo- 
man, t’LKR. 

2 . • . 

The following papers, which are regarded as typical of* Nikola 
Tesla's writings and thoughts in the period of 192*) to l94^» were removed 
for the purpose of record And are listed below in the random order in 
which they were found, together with a brief individual abstract. 

Exhibit A 

"Possibilities of Electrostatic Generators'’ - tin undated 
Article probably written about 1934 discussing -the possibili- 
ties, as a source of high-Yoltage D-C power, of the fan de 
Graaff type of electrostatic belt generator. The article 
states correctly the .electrostatic principles employed in this: 
device snd points but that such generators are not suitable 
_ -for commercial high-power applications, though of undoubted 
scientific value, Tesla* s wireless tower, erected in 1902 on 
Long Island, is stated in this 5 memorandum to have been charged 
to ^ million yolts. 

Exhibit 0 * . 

1 j i 

"Reactive Forces of Glycerine and Dynamite" - ah undated, 
memorandum involving some calculations of the explosive power 
of certain compounds and then deviating to. a discussion of the 
possibility of transmitting power by mechanical vibrations 
along the earth' s crust. 


Exhibit C 


"Process tif Eo-Gassifyin^ Refining, and Purifying Metals" - 
a 41-pags memorandum probably written about 1920 dealing -with 
the above subject and proposing new theories of capillarity end 
surface tension. This correspondence indicated that this had 
been submitted to various industrial companies. 

Exhibit D . * , 

. "Kopiy .to Jmtorg re *thd nenoraticn of high-voltage and the 
acceleration of charged particles 1 " — This document, dated No- 
vember 8, 1935, answers questions raised by Soviet engineers and 
scientists regarding Tesla! s proposal of l*ay 16, 1935* From 
this answer* it is deduced that the proposal concerned the gen- 
eration ef iigh voltages by electrostatic menna. These -means 
consisted of a high-voltage terminal presumably supported on an 
insulating column, and charged by a gaseous qfcarge conveying 
medium passing between ground and terminal. The ideas contained 
in this memorandum ore fairly similar to the belt-conveyor 
electrostatic generator methods proposed by Van de Graiff and 
do ndt appear to offer any unusual features* 

Exhibit E 


?Art bf Telegeodynemic3 » or Art Of Producing Terrestrial 
Motions at Distance" - This document, in the form of a letter 
dated june 12, 1940, to the ttestinghpuse ^leotrio & ^ll^factxirin^ 
Company, proposes a method for -the transmission of large amounts 
of power oyer vast distances by .means of mechanical vibrations 
of the earth* s crust. The. soured of power is a mechanical or 
electromechanical device bolted to some rocky protuberance and 
importing power at a resonance frequency of the ecrth>a crust. 

The proposed scheme appears to. be completely visionary end un-- 
worHable, tfestinghouss’s reply indicates tbeir-.polite .bejeotion 
‘ofthisidoo. *■ "* t 

1 • <* ' . • . 1 

Exhibit? 

"Hew Art of Projecting Cbnbentrated Non-Eispersive Energy 
through Natural Media" - This Undated document by Tesla describes ** 
an electrostatic method of producing very high voltages, and ca- 
pable of very groat power. This generator is used to accelerate 
charged particles, presumably electrons* Such, a beam of high- " 
energy electrons passing tlircugh air is the UConqcntrated ndn- 
dispersive** pean 3 by which energy is transmitted through natural 
media, AS a component of this apparatus there is described an 
opsn-endbd vacuum tube within which the electrons are first ac** 
celerated. 


Exhibit F. (cent.) 

Vhfe proposed, scheme bears ease relation to present Ee~as 
for producing high-energy cathode rays vy the cooperative \:se - 
Of a hick-yoltbge electrostatic generator and; r.n evacuated 
electron ccceleraticn tube. It is well known, however, that 
such devices, while of scientific end nodical interest,, ere 
incapable of the trancraissicn of large amounts of power in 
non-diapcrfced beaus oyer long distances. - Tesla’s disclosures 
in this ceaorento would hot enable the penstruotien of workable 
cctbinaticns ef generator and tube even of United power, though 
the general' elements of such fa Combination apo succinctly de- 
scribed. 

Exhibit Q 

A circular by Carpi Eird, dated September 10, 193&, en- 
titled "Tremendous How Power Soon to Eetnlonshed**, This do- . 
Scribes in popular style .scm biographical lhfcrraticn cencern- 
. ing Eikola Tepla and spne ideas for the tvahenission -pf $ower 
cri which he is stated to be, working* * It appears that the 
method pf trcajcni8sip!i is % the 1 EechanioalyoSohence method 
outlined in Exhibit jP, above, 

Exhibit K 

This exhibit consists of a series pf letters to represen- 
tatives of ’the British Government dated. August 2$> 19 36 j Octo- 
ber 1957f December li, 19$7 j end April y, 1§3§. ift includes 
a rfiply dpted J6nuer> 7, 193$, Iron the British poverndenti 
These letters offer to the British Government, for a fee, the. 
disclosure of a etc^ns for accelerating to high energies minute 
particles. £uch beens vfouid constitute a death ray capable of 
the protection of Great Britain froa air attack.- - 

lbs method proposed is essentially that described in Exhi- 
bit f feboyoi> following ths initial letter dated August 2% 

1936, thQ subseouent letters attempt to clear up the “nieunder- 
stendiegs** of the British representatives and to expedite their 
acceptance of the Tesla proposals. The British reply dated Janu- 
ary 7 ia a polito expressicn of disinterest In the proposal. 

Exhibit! 

In Undated nesopahdua written after Tesla* s *72th birthday 
describing several discoveries whieh ho believed he had made. 

Tfco first related to a dynamic theory of gravity which is de- 
scribed es hot yet completed. The second Stated as a physical 
truth the belief that “there 1 b no energy in natter other than 
that received froa the environment* 1 . This second statement, 
which is discussed at length- in this end other writings of Tesla,, 
indicates hi* disbelief in the existence of atonic or nuclear 
energy, - , 


Exhibit J 


B A Tethod of Producing Powerful Radiations” - an undated. 
Eer.ora-ndua in Tesla) s handwriting describing "a new process of 
generating powerful fays or radiations”. The memorandum reviews, 
the works of Lenard and Cropkes, describes Tesla* s Vrork on the 
producatiod of high voltages, and finally in the last paragraph 
gives the. only description of the invention contained- in the 
meaoraijdna. Thiff description is as follows:. **Briefly stated,, 
say hew simplified process of generating powerful rays, consists, 
in creating through the Medina of a high-speed jet of suitable 
fluid a vacuous space hfouhd a terminal of a circuit and sup- 
plying tho soma with. currents ;of the required "tension and volume” 

Exhibit K 


A letter to prospective licensees on telegdodyn males dated' 
December 27, 1941. This is a single-page letter with the type- 
written signature of Er. Nikola Teals, in which he addresses 
himself to the prospective licensees of telogeodyncaiCs, states 
that oyer a half million dollars was spent on this development 
with funds contributed by the Morgans, Crawford* J. J". Astpr, 
and Fish, as well as commercial Organizations, and states this 
to be a new art with which ’‘lUiveiiqvable wonders can be achieved”, 

Exhibits 

Tesla* s j'lfew System of Fluid Propulsion” «• This is ah un- 
dated memorandum of sbput\20 typewritten pages describing, a sys- 
tem of fluid propulsion, in which the: conversion from hydraulic 
to rotary EOphnnicat power is achieved by passing the fluid be- 
tween fiat circular disks, shaft-mounted and enclosed; in a cas- 
ing* 

t 

This memorandum written about 1925 describes in general 
terms a kind of hydraulic turbine which seems practical. There 
is copious evidence among the other of Desla* s papers that this 
idea was generally disclosed to,* appropriate individuals and , 
that it received favorable cobaent and possibly some use. Borne 
of these comments are contained on the last page of the exhibit. 

Exhibit K 

”The PcWer of the Future** - a memorandum apparently written 
by Tesla end probably in response to a request from seme popular 
science group for on opinion as to. the source of future power. 
This memorandum reviews the gradual evolution of power sources. 

It discusses in some detail the possibility of atomic power and 
states as his opinion that atomic power is not feasible. The 
discussion of .atomic energy is apparently confused to some extent 


Exhibit U (cent.) 

with planetary energy. The article further discusses the 
subject of wind, tides 1 , lightning, and water power as k source 
of commercial energy. The last*, sentence of this memorandum 
states » "^ith ny wireless system, it is practicable to trans- 
nit electrical energy at a distance of twelve thousand iuiles 
with a los3 not exceeding $ per cent. I can conceive of no 
advances which would be core desirable at this tics and, more 
beneficial to the further progress of mankind.** This memorandum 
constitutes an interesting generalized discussion of the various 
sources of power, jt is qualitatively correct for idle most 
part except probably in that portion which d£ds with atonic 
power. ■ 

Exhibit H 

1 fhe Transmission of Electric Enemy Without .Kirns** an 
article by'fl. Teals in the Electric Torld’. Ifaroh 5, 1904, pages 
429-431* A general, somewhatr, bio^aphical" article on Tesla »s 
early work with some - speculation on tha possibility of long- 
distance' wireless transmission of large mounts of energy. 

Exhibit 0 

**fforld System of Wireless Transmission. of Energy* * - an 
article by N. Tesla in. Telegraph end Telephone Age. October 16, 
1927, pages 457 end 460* An article which traces tho errly 
work on the production and transmission of electromagnetic ra- 
diations, describes Tesla’s efforts to increase the amount of 
power which can bp transmitted without wires and concludes 
with a proposed ‘World System** for tha wirolesS transmission ; 
cf both power and Communications. No workable disclosure of 
a means for accomplishing this is included, and' such generali- 
ties Us suggest the approach which Tesla had in mind dp not 
seem capable of hceoapHshing the desired result. 

i j - » 

Exhibit P 

If 

’‘Interview with Ur. Nikola Tesla** by Aldcn, P. i,rcagnao 
for Popular Science Monthly, |iay 24, 1928.. An H-page meaiopan- 
dua written in popular conversational style describing an in- 
terview with hr. Tesla and reporting his present work. This 
report, includes statements on a new airplane, on rocket ships, 
on the wireless transmission of power, on a world system. 'plow, 
for the transmission of ppeech and television, on, the imprac- 
ticability of harnessing atomic energy, on radio, activity, and 
on the acceleration of charged particles, eudh es cathode rays, 
by high voltages. 


* 


£> 


Ah .agreement dated April .20, 1935, between Nikola Tesla 
and the fmtorg/ Trading, Corporation, in which Tesla agreed to 
supply plans, 'specifications, and' complete information on a 
method and apparatus for producing high voltages up to fifty 
' -million volts> for producing very small particles in a, tube 
open to air, for' increasing the charge of the .particles to 
the full voltage of the high' potential terminal, arid for pro- 
jecting the particles to distances of a hundred miles op’ more. 
The maximum speed of the particles was specified os not less 
than 350 .nileh per second* ’The receipt of $25,000 fop for 
this disclosure wad acknowledged, in this agreement, which was, 
signed hy hikoia Tesla and by A. Bartanian of the /mtbrg' Trad- 
ing Corporation., The method referred to i& this agreement is 
-apparently that described in Exhibit .If,, above. Xt is probable' 
that iijehibit D. above, is sir effort by Tesla to "clear up the 
questions raised! by Solicit ehgiueers, after the subject di&«* 
closure hnd been made., There is. no evidence that the inveh- 
.tiohs and information, referred to in this agreement, are othbr 
than* those described- in a number .’pf Tesla? s papers ahdpub- 
liehed articles.', s lt should -therefore he expected, and it la 
<• substantiated by Exhibit p, that thip disclosur.e subsequently ’ 
proved uiworkabld* -- * \ ' . . * ’ \ . 


An examination of several items of scientific, apparatus cnOng 
•the Tesla efforts at the L'anhattan Warehouse and ip- a deposit boxratj the 
QoyernOr Clinton Hotel shewed those to be standard olectricpl measuring 
instruments in cbhnondse several decades ago, ’ . 


’ Technical Aide, 

division 14, HDF.C, 


Mass. Xrtsti of Tech,, 
Cembridge, Hass,, 
J-nuspy 30 , 1943 » , - 


jJGT/d 


4 


I , ' 



65-12290 
B3R?mhm v 


Director, FBI 


Dear Siri 



* - * 

- I ' *KoWYbrk 7, New fork / ■ 

\ , «. - 

„ i%. 

. CONGENITAL 

• "T-T : j , . ; ' » , October 17, 1945 

r ? ^ V * 

ft — , ... 7 . 

•;. ■ * — - 

Re? UNKNOWN SUBJECTS) 

> . , SAVA KQ3ANQVICH) 

r * ' > P ' Experiments ;and research of NIKOLA TESLA' (deceased) 
ESPIONAGE - Jt 


Reference is made to the Bureau letter dated January 21, 1943, which 
bore a caption siailiar to that mentioned above. 

The referenced letter dealt with the death, on January 7, 194?, of 
the famous inventor, NIKOLA TESLA, who as well as being the inventor of 
Alternating. Current, perfected many electrical devices - . He is also credited 
with having developed the so called ’’death ray” which would safeguard any' 
country from attack by air.- 

On Juno 9, 1945, a RALPH BBR03TRSSSER of New fork City furnished 
information of a nonspecific nature indicating that it was his belief that 
persons sympathetic to Russia were making an effort to secure the effects of 
NIKOLA TESLA in order to salvage therefrom any models or designs of possible 
military value. Nr. BHRGSTRBSSSR claimed that he hoard that .ABRAHAM N. 

SPANEL, President of the NATIONAL LATEX CORPORATION, of Dover, Delaware was 
the motivating influence behind this attempt to obtain TESLA’S papers which 
are presently held in storage at the MANHATTAN STORAGE WAREHOUSE, in Now York 
City. B^GSTRBSSER premised to return to the New York Pi eld Division shortly 
after his initial visit and furnish farther and more specific information to 
support his claims. 


He was not heard from again, however, until September 27, 1945, at 
which time he furnished the. following additional information? 

He said that a boyhood chum of his from Wichita, Kansas, BLOYCS 
FITZCTALD, had been TESLA’8 protego and one of the inventors few confidents. 
According to BERG3TRESSSR, FITZGERALD who is now an Army Private stationed 
at Wright Held, Dayton, Ohio, is a brilliant 29 year old scientist who spent 
endless hours with TESLA prior to the lathers death, during which time TESLA 
explained to him most seoret experiments. BERGSIRSSS3R stated that FITZGERALD 
mot TESLA in November 1942, but he had been corresponding with the latter 
sinco 1935. According to the informant, FITZGERALD had deyolopod sene sort 
of anti-tank gun, the details of which ho presented to TESLA who made certain 
corrections in design and specifications to further perfect the weapon. 

BGRGGTRRSSER related that sometime in December'* 1942, when FITZGERALD 
was attending a meeting, of tho AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS, ho 
made tho acquaintance os ABRAHAM SPANE1 who became interested in FITZGERALD’S 



Letter, direct or, n?x " 
HI 65-12290 









October 17', 1945 


gun* SPATEL offered financial aid to FITZGERALD and the two ware in the 
closest contact. With -each other lor a' considerable period of time. 
BEEGSTRES5TR said that FITZGERALD had lined op a deal for the purchase of 
the gun by the RLMlftOTON ARMS OOU?A?rr,but for some reason S PANEL blocked 
this deal by reaching top neh in the P.SUNGTOrf COMPANY. SPANEL is thon 
reported as having. obtained a job for FITZGERALD with the HIGGINS SNIP 
E’JILBIKO 0CKP1NY in New Orleans and negotiated .a contract with FITZGERALD 
for tha purchase and manufacture of the gun in a manner which would return 
£ 0 $ of tha profits derived to SRlSEL, 


BT.GSTHESSiR stated that in November of 1943, for some unknown reason 
but which be trlieveo to be attributable to SPAN2L, FITZGERALD was fired by 
tha HIGG3S OWPANY. In September of 1944*. FITZGERALD was inducted into the 
Arhy and for a considerable period of tine was located at an ordinance 
experimental station at Elgin Field, Florida. BERGSJRESSER stated that at 
the present tine FITZGERALD is engaged in a highly secrot experimental 
project at Fright Field in Dayton, Ohio. In spite of his rank of Private, 
FITZGERALD actually is the director of this research and is working with 
many to? young scientists who wore inducted into Amy froa leading industrial 
posts. 


According to B^GSTRESSER, FITZGERALD is presently working on the 
perfection of TESLA'S "death ray" which in FITZGERALD'S opinion is the only 
possible defence against offensive use by another nation of the Atooic Ecab* 

In this connection, it is noted that the New York Tines of Septeabor 22, 1940 
in an article entitled "SCIENCE IN THE JOT* by WILLTA’A A. LAURENCE, Science 
Editor states that TESLA tdevulged to LAURENCE the fact that he had developed 
a "death ray" or "tele force" which TESLA claimed would melt airplane motors 
at a distance of 250 miles, so that actually an invisible Chinese Wall would 
be built arcuhd a country against attack by an enemy air force i 

According to the article in the TIMES, this electrical device would 
operate by the generation of power from a plant, a number of which might- bo 
located strategically along our coast linos and the bo am froa which would 
melt any engine within a radiust pf 250 miles. 

raisrrcssaf stated that during FITZGERALD'S acquaintance with 
SPANEL, FITZGERALD had told ci PANEL of his associations with TESLA and had 
Apparently described to SPANEL some of TESLA'S mo3t secret work* BERGSTRSSSER 
bol.ievos that SPANEL, who he claims is definitely pro-Russian in attitude, 
is now attempting through legal procedure to secure custody of TESLA'S 
effects which are now held by lECLA’S only heir, one SAVA KOSANOVICII, who 
is presently in Yugoslavia occupying some governmental po3t. 

It will be recalled that in an article published- on March 15, 1945,. 
by tha Ptfc FEATURE SYNDICATE INCORPORATED, WESTBROOK FBGLERT, charged SPANEL 
with spreading pro-communist and pro-- Russian propaganda through his full 
page advertisement in tha newspapers, which SPANEL characterised as being 
published for the INTERNATIONAL LATEX CORPORATION, as a public service- feature 
It is also interesting to observe that in the New York Times of October 2, 
1945, an article appears which states that SPANEL is suing the KING FEATURE 
SYNDICATE INCORPORATED for six million dollars alleging the column by 
PEGLER to have been liabelous. 


letter- Pireotor 
HI 65-12290 



0 


October 1945 


DEP.GSTRES3S3 stated that thresh FITZGERALD he too had net SPANS! 
and froa this personal acquaintance ho formed the opinion that SPANS! was 
definitely a cocaunist and is probably one of the financial, supporters of 
the Cocaunist Party in this country. BEEGSTBSSSZR stated that SPANS! was 
born in Russia,, hut is now an American citizen. Up also charged that SPAKE! 
exerted tremendous political influence in Washington, D. C. > ahd. said that 
one hf SPAIN'S closest political* friends was HENRY HALLAC3. 

FEG.G5TP.GSS5R advised that two agents froa Arny Intelligence contacted 
and stated that in an investigation to determine the qualifications of 
FITZGERALD’ for a cccaisaion, they bad developed information indicating that 
SPAKE! was definitely endeavoring to secure possession of TESLA’S effects. 
F$GC7R r SSTR indicated that Amy Intelligence was pursuing an investigation, 
along these lines in an attempt to ascertain the complete story in this 
regard. 

For the bureau's Information, BEEGSTRBSSER was horn on July 3> 1912 
at Pueblo, Colorado, he is unmarried, end his family resides in Wichita, Kansas. 
He is a graduate of Northwestern University and until July 1945 had been a 
employee of theGSH, overseas branch, froa March 1943 until 'January 1945. Ho 
had been stationed in. China, attached to General Stillwell’s Headquarters, 
and was in charge of the physiological warfare Department of the 08T* 

BERGSTRESSER at present is hot employed, however, he appears to have ample 
funds since he travels all over the country and resides in reputable hotels. 

Just recently he stated that he had driven General Stillwell* s car froa 
Washington to the West Coast as a personal favor to the General’s wife. 

He advised that it is Ms desire to cooperate with FITZGERALD dn securing 
legal possession of TSSLA'S effects in order that a memorial foundation, nay 
bo established fox' the protection of TESLA’ S experiments and for the preserva- 
tion of the inventors memory. 

E3RGSTRESSSR stated that HTZGERALD had interested a group Of young 
Army scientists now working with hia at Height Field in this foundation, and 
their ultimate goal is to secure the support of a wealthy backer in order that 
a foundation might be established and that a sort of ’’idea factory** night 
result. He said that they intended, to, contact HENRY FORD, SR., to solicit 
Ms aid in this regard. • r * ■ 

• EEEfSraSSBSRrelated^that probably the greatest idea of TESLA’S was - 

that involving the wireless transmission of electrical power. Ho claimed 
that TESLA had performed a' successful experiment many years ago at Pikes 
Peak, at *hich time he hamassed local current frod the sun’s rays which he 
built up into a huge potential of electrical energy. E2RGSTRESSER said that 
according to FITZGERALD, if this idea, could; bo furthered, all electrical 
energy to operate the world’s machinery might be gotten absolutely free rather 
than hy the costly method with which electrical power is presently generated. 

Ho said -that his idea was to conduct further experiments along this line 
i in China wheije the need fdr electrical power is very great. 

inquiry was made At tfe^HAJiRATTAN STORAGE WAREHOUSE in Hew York City, 
and it was determined that tho effects of HIKOLA TESLA are contained in sane 




Latter, rirect?r, ;Q. 
65-12220 , ' 


ober 17, 1945 


75 packing ccces and trunks and aye presently under coal by the Kcw York 
Stats Department of Taxation. It was learned tbat the rental for this 
storage, which approbates $15 per month* i® being paid by one d!A2L0TTB 
)iUZAH, 134 East 63rd Street, Ke* York* Yew York* who is listed as the agent 
for SAVA K03ir07ICB. 

Inquiry was also cade at the office of the Alien Property Custodian 
in few York City, concerning an investigation conducted by this office at 
the tiso of TtCLA'S death, and at which time the latte rs property was placed 
under seal by the Potted States Government. sir. WALT^l C03S£3!> Chief 
investigator' for the- Alien Property Custodian, provided a cover lottor and 
a rxgary of material? ownod by TSSLA at the time of his. death which was 
exaipod by <OT 0. ?E?4?, of tbo office of SdEYTIFXC P.^AIiOt b 
nr< Yr* GORSUO! also stated that bis file in this matter reflected that 
on the night TESLA died his safe wa 3 forcod open by a representative of the 
8301 * it WALKS! nn m?m. It wad fr* OOSCUOI'S belief that a Ur. STT3ZEY 
who is believed to bo one of the editors Of the POPTiAS STOC3 UAQASIK3 was 
present In T-SIA’S roca shortly after the safe was opened. These individuals 
ware WFLIS nORC2, EDIARD PAL’CT, had J03 .J. CQ3SGIT. 

There, are enclosed herewith two typewritten copies of tho report by 
JhV TR9IP of tba ALIEN KIOPSITY G0S70PIAN reflecting the findings of Ur. 

TtPtIP, following ljis examination of TULA’S effects. There is, also enclosed 
herewith a photo'static copy of a list 6f persons associated with EIE9LA 
TSSM. This, latter itea was furnished by Mr. BS3(33Tn3SSE3. 

The above information is, furnished for the fiureae* s information, 
end no investigation is being conduoted by this office. 

Tory truly yours, 

/ • 

*?. $„ G05ROY, SAC 


3 Enclosures 




* — r> % 


2SEEG (?SSH^3H2) 


TSEPL-3H2/EEH/hle 
19 October 1945 


Federal .Bureau, of Investigation; 

Federal Court House Building 

Hev Tork, Hev York ? V™ ' » 

.Attention* Kr, Harvey Both. 

Gentlenen: 

,It, is requested that in the interest of National Defense,, 
eccese be given to the effects. of Dr„ Sicola.'ffe'sla.fceid 'i&kai^ttak 
warehouse at 57 th Street, Hew Tori: City, Few Tort. • ■ 

* ’ « 

He are desirous of obtaining pertinent lnforEation concerning 
projects under consideration jby ithe Control E0UipEent^Snch\of f »ty 

Bquipaent laboratory,. Engineering Division,, «Air SSchnlcal' Service ‘ 
Coninande 

It is understood that. Dr, fesla, was veil versed in the, 
particular field of inYesti^ation^under study' by the jtoay Air 'Fptcesj 
and it is, believed that the $ata fron>‘his estate may assist us 
further, ‘ ' 

Be spectfully yours , 




.L/C. CRAiGIE, 

Brigadier General; U, S, k 
Chief, Engineering Division 



Du* If 1945' 1 


■HEtiSH 
, 65-12290 


Director', FBI 




- October; 31, 1945 
gfijmpTIAL 



RSs, UKKirai SUBJECTS* 

s^va mmnciih . • . 

Experinentoand research , of in$QLA" TESLA' (deceased) 
LSHoMoe -^IT' ‘ 


Dear Sir; 

5 V * 

Reference io dado to a letter dated October 17, 1945, captioned as 
above, which contains, a auaaary of recept- informtion received by this 
office relative to too effects of NIKOLA TESLA, .deceased, inventor. 

1 ' ' T * ** H? 1 - * 

On October 26,. 1945, Piivate BLOXCF, FITZGERALD, ASM 36916930, who * 
is Rontioped in the reference lottery called in person at the New York 
office together with Private DAVID M. MATT, ASS 39293663,; fct. HERBERT 
0. SCRUTT, and it. R,B. KODLE, all of a research davelopceht unit at 
Kright field, Dayton, Ohio, These nan carried a letter signed by BRIGADIER 
GENERAL L.C. GRAIGEB, Chief Engineering Division, bright field, requesting 
, the assistance of this officp in allowing the bearers of the letter 
' access to- the effects of HEKOLA TESLA. 

1, 

It Was explained to -Private FITZGERALD and his associates that 
tills office had no jurisdiction oyer TESLA’ s effects, and FITZCETJiLD was 
referred to the office Of toe Alien Property Custodian, which made a 
very thorough investigation of TESLA'S belongings following the inventory 
death. 

^ 4 - 

For the Bureau* s inforaation, Private FITZGERALD j and- his associates 
statod: ttot the Ainy boliovea TESLA *s I'Deatii p^y«' to be the only possible 
defense against the. atonic boab, and they feel, that possibly the secret 
of the. "Death Ray*« lied atsong TESLA'S effects, which occupy several trunks 
at the Manhattan Storage Warehouse, Kew York City. Xt will be recalled 
that prior to TESLA'S death, FITZGERALD, Who is reported to be a brilliant 
young scientist, trap taken by 'TESLA as his protege. 


This office is conducting no investigation on this natter i 


iJ 


'p.i 


v/ 


, - — - , 

— - 


"Very truly yourS, 

fv' 

R.. E. COIEOY, SAQ-^i /*) ■> 

' £,V« 



Eirector, F3J ’ April 1950 

SAC , Kew York 

SA7A H* KCBAN07IC 
HiSETiHAIi SECTOWTO 
(Dufile 65-47953) 


liebulet da;fcedARril-3 last. 

On AprU 7^1950 agents of this office interviewed I I2r«. J*V* T0T23, 

Vice President of "the IJanhattan Warehouse and Storage. Company, 52nd Street 
it 7th Avenue, Kew York City, arid, at that tine ISi, VOTES advised that the 
rules of his firm required that, all persons gaining access to goods stored 
by Manhattan first had to fill out an appropriate fora sotting fdrth thoir 
naae3, date of visit, aid reason for, requesting access to the goods* 

In a review of thofile pertainiris to the storage of the effects of 
HlfCU TESLA, }£;♦ POSTS revealed that only ono auchvisit. had been nado by 
persons outsido *of the management of Manhattan Storage itself. This one 
occaasion took place on January 26 and 27, 1943, at Which tire representatives 
of the Alien Property Custodian made. a thorough review of the entire effects 
of the 50ESEA estate* 


She TESU effects are stored in rooms 51 and 51 of Manhattan Storage’s 
warehouse at 52nd Street & 7th Avenue, Kew l'ork City. ME* MICHAEL JEQ2M, who 
Stated he had been Floor Supervisor for approximately 10 years on the floor 
in question, stated that he. could recall only the one- occassion in early 1943 
whtu 411 ekaaination Was made of the TEG LA effects* He stated that at that 
tins numerous . photographs wore token. by the examiners*, Eis description of 
the equipment used would tend to show that ri microfilm reproduction was ,mde 
of acne of the papers of tha deceased scientist* if * KIH0 added that several 
of the group caking the examination wore U.S* I?avy uniforms, and during the 
two days required to complete the examination the civilian assistants, in the 
group were identified to him only as «EEDEsAL AUUKdlTIEC'. According to 121. 
KTEO, no other instance of jaicref lining of the recqrds of the TSDlA estate has 
taken place since that tine* 

It should be noted that the bureau was informed of the exanination men- 
tioned above by Kew York letter (with attachments ) dated October 17, 1945* 
entitled E$KOK? SUBJECT, SA7A KDSAl^TICHl Experiments & Research of EBPLA 
ECU (D&ucased), Espionage-H. 


cot 65-12290 



fo 

ERHtJJC 

105-1391 


r T 


‘.non cc *i** 4 «i3 ' 

<1 l' ‘ . 

t> & 



5ffi\SS 


-v 


* ' 




Letter to Director, FBI 
HI 105-1391 

f 


* * 

UR. POTTS stated that no inquiry had been received by Manhattan fron 
SAVA N* IpSAIiOVICH, nor had Uanhattan infdnaed hha, in anyway, that an ex- 
amination of the TESLA effects' had been node by anyone* In fact, added :1SR* 
POTTS, the only correspondence relating to the TESLA estate has seen in the 
form of bills for storage. 

IS* POTTS stated that any personal inquires regarding the estate would 
of necessity be directed to him, and to date no such inquiries have been made* 

Interviewing agents explained, to UR* 'POTTS that the examination hade, 
as mentioned above, was not instigated by the Bureau, nor had tbs Bureau taken 
part in that examination. *, ' 

Unless .advised to the contrary, this .investigation is being placed in 
,a closed s,tatu 3 , and no further investigative action is contemplated by this 
■office. CLOSED. 





'k 



-2- 


MEMO 




New York, N. Y v 


HB^CHEJDT 

wueiaH 

-HR-STEIff 
|.,„MR.,C( < tUEB 

|_J^GjUNVtUJ5 

»lf?V?9 . , 

sk 'ssaWtJ 

KTiffi. K. > 

i-VKOS ' 

L.it!urjsa 

,.lpL SCtUVAN' 
..,ME. WAwSH 
...mfrO.;L 

l.«^3cm* trass: 

..„TUAiNi.\‘G X!H5T 


Ref UNKNOWN SUBJECTS; • 

- SAVA. KOSANOVICH) " . ^ ■ 

Experiments and Research of NIKOLA. pSLA (deceased) 
ESPIONAGE - M _ . , - 1 . ' 


, ‘ At 10:40 A. M.> 2 / 5 / 5 !,, MrV Carl’^ert^ieto bureau, called rela- 

tive to-the following individuals:— ABRAHAM SPANEL; RALPH BERGSTRESSER; 
NIKOLA JESLA. 

Mr.. Hennrich said NIKOLA !p!SLA had died some years back; that 
;he Nad heen quite ’a scientist; and-^Vas supposed to have been, pbior to 
his death,, working oq death ray's* After he died ’there .were allegations 
made, that awong his papers, were .material from which a death ray could be 
developed* ao a re sult- o f — wh - i - o h pe Alien -Enemy Custodian seized all his 
documents . 

.AHUiHAM SPANEL- used to be with International Latex Corp.- Durr 
ing the years, there have been a number of nonspecific’ complaint's received 
r.e SPANEL's alleged- CP sympathies .. One of these complaints came from 
RALPH BERGSTRESSER-. 

RALPH BERGSTRESSER,- in' 1945, visited the NYO and talked with, 

SA Harvey Rath. Mrs Rath reported this to the Bureau in memo dated 
- 10/17/45 under the title, UNKNOWN' SUBJECTS; SAVA KOSANOVICH, EXPERIMENTS 
AND RESEARCH OF NIKOLA KESLA (Deceased); ESPIONAGE - M. That memo re- 
flects an. interview' with RALPH BERGSTRESSER in which BERgSIRESSER fur- 
nished information regarding SPANEL and also Tegardfog^pSLA papers. 

The inference was SPANEL was trying to get hold of jSsLA papers for 
'some sinister purpose.; As a result of that contact, NTOcontacted the 
Alien Enemy Custodian and found they had submitted the’pSlA papers' in 
19^3 to M.I.T. .and a representative ,of M.I.T. had furnished them with 
information that they found no information that wouid he helpful ai to 
an unfriendly nation. 


WMWtMEB 
»• ’ / * > / ^ 


/’-T r : . 

i . - — , r - - ’ - 

~vU 


/ 

FBI -NEW YORK 

FEB-5195 




f -Now, BER 6 STOESSER) the early part, .of last year,- wrote to " 

Senator Joseph- McCarthy and the . Senator turned his. letters ©vfef tcf 
. the' Bureau, ;One of the letters id Senator McCarthy 'was regarding 
SPANEL. ’Jn that ietieb he advised McCarthy that he had taken two 
•days in about .April, 1945,7 to e^laiti the entire story, to -the FBI 
in New York City i. He said they started ah ihvesti^tioh .against 
SPANEL and after 'a few weeks indicated that their hands were tied;, 
that there was nothing the FBI could do as they had been stopped 
from a higher level* They did not say yes or .no in- reference 1 to 
SPANEL; in 'other words > they would qob commit themselves too ■much* 
However, they later indicated that apparently my suspicions were 
true. HARVEY RATH, 'the..EBl- agent, whp I dealt with most, resigned ; 
his job and requested that X never discuss this matter with him ' * 
again; that he had a Wife ahd family to, consider. 1 ’asked him If 
there wasn't" sOme hope left and he stated that the ,r 3 »t hope was, . 
Congress," X have never seen or contacted him again as per his 
^ r equest. 

Mr* Hennrich said Senator McCarthy turned this material 
over to the Bureau last June- or July,- but nothing Was done about 
it. The other day -Wesibrpbk Pegler waa in town mid stopped ih to 
see Asst.. Dih, X. B. Nichols-, at which ti^e he. spoke- alotabout 
SPANEL. Sometime ago SPANEL. sued Pegler for libel and now it ap- r 
pears VEGLEK is out to get him, 'One of Pegler'S- Contacts is BEHQi 
STRESSER. When Mr. Nichols reviewed the Bureau files in this mat- 
ter, he inquired about the reason why former SA Harvey Rath had 
not teen interviewed ih this matter * 

,Mr * Hennrich requested that former SA Harvey Rath 1 be 
interviewed and that we find out What he has: to say in addition 
to the information reported by -him in NY letter to the Bureau 
IO/17/45 mentioned above." 


WILLIAM M. WHELAN, ASAC 



New'. York, N.Y. 


mo. : ( • - 

•Her UNKNOWN SUBJECTS; 

SAVA KOSANOVICH; “* /. • 

Experiments and Research of NIKOLA KiSLA (deceased) 

■ , ESPIONAGE - $ * • ’’ \ ■ ‘ 

* , ‘ - - ’ • * * . . * 1 ' ; 

At 10jt0 A(r M., 2/5/51/ Mr. Carl Eenririch, Bureau, called rela-. 
tlve to the following individuals : — ABRAHAM -SPAnEL; RALPH BERGSTRESSBR ; 

NIKOLA KESLA.. . ' . . ' : , ’ 

> Mry Hennrich. said NIKOLA KESLA had died, some years hack? that 
he had been quite a Scientist ; .and was supposed to :haye heen, prior to 
his death/working on death rays*. After he died, there yere allegations, ij 

made that among .his papers were material from which a death ray codld he 
developed, as .a result of which the. Alien Enemy custodian seized all his 
documents* P . ; ' i* ' ' ■ ’ ' 

AESAHAM SPANEL used to he with International latex COrp r Dur- 
ing the- years,, there haye; heen a number of nonspecific complaints received^ 
re SPANEL?s, alleged CP sympathies. .One of these. coa$laints came from. ’ 

RAI^H- BERGSfEESSER* *. ,* '/ '* / 

RALPH BERGS1RESSER, in 19^5* visited the HYO and talked with -s , *' 4 ,| 

SA Harvey Bath. J>5r. Rath reported this to the Bureau in memo' dated , , ‘ 
IO/ 17 A 5 under the title, UNKNOWN SUBJECTS; SAVA KOSANOVICH, EXPERIMENTS ,| 

AND RESEARCH OP NIKOLA KESLA (Deceased) ; ESPIONAGE - M. That memo re- j 

fleets an interview with. RALPH BERGSTRESSBR in Which BERGSTRESSEt fur- 1 v ;| 

-nished informtion. regarding SPANEL and also regarding KEBLA papers., , 

inference was SPANEL Was trying to: get hold of' -KESLA papers for ,* 

some sinister purpose. As a result, of that contact, NYO contacted the. 

; Alien Enemy Custodian and found, they- had submitted. the KESLA. papers in 
1933 id M.f.T. and a representative of M.IiTi had . furnished them with 
^tafonsation that they found no information that would he heipful -at to 
an; unfriendly nation. • ... ♦ ] 




, $WM?B 
Memo 


Bov, DEEGSERE33ER, the early part of last year* .wrote to. 
Senator Joseph. McCarthy and the Senator turned his letters oyer to 
the Bureau. One of the letters to Senator Ifcvarthy yas regarding 
SPAMii In- that letter* he advised-KcCArthy that he had ’tahen two 
days in about April;. 1945, to explain the entire story to the FBI 
in.-Mev Xork City* Me said they Started an investigation against 
SEraBt and .after- a few weeks indicated, that their hands were tied; 
hut that there yas nothing the FBI could do as they had been stopped 
from a higher level. (They did np.t cay yes or ho in reference to. 
SPADED; in. other words, they would not commit themselves too each. 

J Kowever, they later indicated that apparently my suspicions, were, 
true. MRVET HASH, the FBI agent who I dealt with host, resigned 
his job and requested that I never discuss this matter with, him 
again; that he had a ; wifp .and f adily to consider^ I. asked him if' 
there wasn't s6ae hope left and he stated 'that, the ' n Jpi>Cjtepe v£S 
C9ngress,. n I have never seen or contacted ,hia* again as per his 
request. 


Mr. Eennrich said Senator McCahthy turned this material 
over to the Bureau last June or July, but nothing was done about 
it, 5&e- .other day Jfestbrook Pogier ~was i n town and stopped in to 
see.Asat. .Dir., Ti« 3..lfichola, at. vhitjh iime he spoke hlot about 
SPAfiEL. SO^tine, a§0 BPAl^ sUei Pe^Or for libel and now it ap- 
pears PEGLER. ja out' to get*, him. 6ne of Pegler'a contacts ik BE56-* 
SEffiSSER % When Mr. Richols reviewed the Bureau, fileh in hhis mat- 
ter, he - inquired about the reason why former SA Harvey Rath had " 
not been interviewed in. this mattery 

.Mr. Rennrlch requested that former' SA- Harvey Rath bp 
interview^ and that; We find out what ho has to say in Addition, 
to, the infomatioa reported by him in MY letter to the Bureau 
16/17/45 mentioned above* ■ » 


WILLIAM 21, KBSLAH, ABAC 


pflMPB 


2/8/51 



Director, FBI 

Att: Inspector Carl Eennrlch 
SAG, Lew York 

oskkokt subjects; 

SAVA KOSArOVICHj 

Exper inerts and Research of HIKOLA TESLA (Deceased) 

ispionks - II 



i 


< Reference is cade to telephone call froa Inspector Carl Eeanricb, 
Bureau, to A3AC W* M. Whelan, 2/5/51. 


The Bureau pointed out 'they were in receipt of a letter 'written, 
by RALPH BE3G3THE33ER to Senator Joseph McCarthy relative to one AEHAHAM 
CPAEEL In which he cakc3 certain allocations about conversations which he 
had with forcer SA Harvey E. Eath, On 2/8/51, lirV Hath caae to this office 
and furnished the following inforoationl 


After reviewing HI letter to Bureau IO/17/45 which had been dic- 
tated by BATH, he recalled that on 6/9/45 BEIQS3EIB323 case to the Hew YOrk 
Office and furbished cone nonspecific i^oroation and he acaia appeared at 
the Eev York Office and spoke to Hr. Eath 9/27/45* Ail of the inforcatioa 
furnished by J2SG3SHESGI2 vas reported in the above referenced letter. 
These are the chly two visits Mr. Eath recalls EIT.G3EE33IB ever having 
cade to this office. 

For the Bureau’s inforcatioa, a search of HY files reflect 
BSlCGTBECSEa- caae to “this office on another natter and, furnished a cca- 
plaint 8/10/42, which natter has no relation whatsoever to the above 
captioned matter. It should be pointed out also that the inforcatioa 
furnished by BEEGSEIESSEl in 1942 was also of a nonspecific nature. 

Shis inforcatioa was set forth in report of SA John S. Murphy, HY, 
10/22/43, in the case entitled JOSEPH THE0D02E WALDOCK, was ESP, G. 


Hr. Eath recalls that he left- the Bureau in liiy, 1946, to • 
enter private Industry; that sosSetine after his resignation JESSsSSEESCEt 
contacted hie telephonically at his place of business. Ee cculd offer no 
explanation as to how EEHG3TKEP3EH knew where he vas employed. £12533333- 
at that time, asked bin if tke FBI was doing anything about the cat- 
ter he had previously reported and Mr. Eath recalls having told hia that 
that was eonetktng about vhich he could offer no inforsatioa since he had 
officially resigned his connection with that agency* Kr. P,ath rcaenbers 
specifically inforaing E33G3TEES53R that, if he, had aay further inforna*. 
tion to provide,* he should take same to the Hew York Office where ecaeoac 
fully qualified would be cognizant of all facts previously furnished. 

Kr. Eath ha3 not heard froa BEEGSZSECSia since that phone call. Be has 


K3i:KS3 

65-12290 


• T *'“K ' »' 




' 'iVj 


(j f' /> k/ r >-%\ 


K3UKFB 

0-1229^ , ! ' 

further /that just after he left the bureau, he received calls frost 
several persons, particularly confidential sourced he had developed} 
with whom he had lef t Ms tooe phone to, , tsake Inquiries pi him or t6 
give hits information Shd ■&?, in all instanced, made it a practice 
to refer thesa to thd liew fork Office just as he did BERG3IRES3ER. 

The files of the* New York Office definitely Indicate, that 
BERG3TRE33ER did not -furnish any information to this office in 
April, 190, as he hah alleged} hut that he came to this office on 
two sepcurate occasions, nameiy 6/9/0 and 9/27A5* 

' k With regard, to BERGSTREi&ER’soUecation that the FBI star- " 
ted an investigation against SPAKEL and -after a fev weeks Indicated 
their hands were tied, the Bureau is advised that there is. no record 
in this office Of our ever starting on investigation of SPAHSL and, 
as a tatter of fact SPAHEI* resides in Delaware and such an investiga-. 
tion would not he undertaken by this. office* RATS advised that he 
at no time advised BERCSTRESSER that the Bureau was undertaking any 
investigation- of SPARED and neither did he ever indicate that the 
Bureau was not InvesticMing him: because its handa vere tied. Ee 
never indicated to BERG0RES3ER that his (B2RC£TRES3ER' , &) suspicions 
relative to SPAKEL were either true or false. 

^ I 

Relative to BERGSTEtESSER *® knowledge that RATS. was. carried 
and had a family, Hr. Rath advised ibis knowledge ray have been given . 
to EERGSTRESSER in the following way* The interviews’ between RATE 
and EERGSTRESSER had been friendly*. When EERGSTRESSER called, RATE 
after he bad left the Burea'Uy sometime in 190, RATS believes EERO- 
STRESSES asked him Why he left the Bureau euid RATS says he may have 
replied that he bad a wife and family and had recently purchased a 
hope in Efew Jersey and found the- needs of FBI service to travel around , 
difficult for him under the circumstanced. Ks. Rath said he definitely 
did not ask EERGSTRESSER cot to call him or ever discuss this matter 
with .him because he had &. wife and family. Re did request EERGSTRESSER 
hot to call him in this matter any more since he Was -no longer connected 
with' the FBI and such matters, should be dismissed with a representative 
of that, organization. 


Mr* Bath further states that he did cot jlisfcuss the 
ncrits of this case la anyway during his -last telephone Conyer 
cation with 3ER033BESSIB hence) he is positive that ha 
*cever isade any stateneht that there was! no hope left br that, 
’’the last hope va3 confess’’ ♦ 

Since the One phone call referred to above Ur, Bath 
has had no contact whatsoever with ESB0S5HESSBB had he has 
never heard anything trod hita or hhout -hia# 



+ ■=• 




5 




& 


SMSm) F3Z 


7/25/57 


SAC, heu yoEK (65-12290) 



l 


i\f!r / 

hi /IIIKOIA tetA (Deceased,) 
vKK 13 -YU 

* *Y z - f 

PETS! LAVO, 132 . Vest 7 oth Street?, llpW'York 


f ' t ; v-;**-*f V 


Li% 


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S& 





£4, llett York, a. United Stated cltiscn of Yugoslav 
extraction, iilto ox occasion, voluntarily furnishes 
the 1:011 York Office With information ha considers to 
to in the intcrcstsof the ^security of the United 
Staijea Government, furnished Special AgCnt 
NICHOLAS J,11AS7E0VICI the following information on 

mr 3, 1&7: 


SAVO stated that a certain woman named 
lira, VMQA& gTOrlf t&e lives with her husband, 

JOBl* at the colonial Hotel, 51 West 01st Street, llcw 
York 24, Novi York, has he.cn issuing newsletters which 
contain information pertaining, to flying saucers _ ' 
and intexplanctary ratters. 


SAVO . stated that in his opinion ilr* and 
Hr 3- STQTih are exploiting' the reputation and genius s 
s of NIKOLA TESLA, deceased, inventor of Yugoslav 
extraction who ohiseyed world Wide fame ah a result of 
his inventions in the United states* 



TESLA was torn in Smiljan, Yugoslavia in 
July, 1859 and cane to the United States in 185)4 1 
and became a naturalised United States eitisori. In 
1C3$ TESLA designed the arc-lighting System and -two.- - - • 
years ;later ho ihvonted the Sfcsla motor and designed z. 
a plan for the tran±dssion of alternating current. >• 
In subsequent years, TESLA Jo discoveries and inventions - 
ineUGod such fields and appliances as viiroleos . ' - 
communication, electrical oscillation, radiant power- and 
radio activo- matter. After 1900, communications, 
and wireless power transmission occupied most- of 
his research, ‘ ' * ’ ’ - 


2 - Eueau (nil) (encs. 2 ). - * 

L - Los, Angeles;.., (Info) (Encl.l) (RTd) 

r>UeW York (65-12299)' ‘ 


visaed !> 

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bg-’fz&f 0 -<35~ 


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65-42290 ‘ 


TESLA* s only military invention Was. a method, 
to thick ho once eluded but nap? .fully described. 

This invention was. a means whereby an. inpcrtotrabla 
/wall of force" can bo erected around the United % 
States 1 borders thick would render helpless any . . - 

military attack# TESLA disclosed the existence 4 v - 
of his pian in 1934 and stated he intended to present 
it to the Geneva Conference but -seldom referred to it 
aftorvjard. , ■ - • - - T r . *’ ' 


The "ftcwYork Times" dated 9/22/40,,. 
carried an article setting forth, UlQJQLA TESLA’ s plan for a 
"Death Ray"* -5his article included information to i- 
■ * > - - * ’the effect that TESLA* oh his- 84th birthday* duly 10, 1940* 

. - . advised Hew York Times reporter 5 WIELIA!I A. LAWRENCE ' . . 

that he was ready te -divulge to the United States 
- - Government the secret of his "teleforce"* with which 

• * ' . ho said airplane motors Would be molted at a distance ,‘ 

of £50 miles so that an invisible Chinese wall of . , 

, defense would be built' abound the cdUntry against nny - - . t 

attempted attach by an; enemy airforce no tsatter hov| 
largo, Adcordihs to T3^LA, this ir toloforeo" was f 

based dh ah entirely new principle* of Physics that 
. 7 "no one, has eVor dreamed about" and was different from 
thxirinciple 'embodied in his inventions relating to 
. the transmission tf electrical power from a distance* 

_ : for which he received a number of basid patents*- . - •_ 

r 4 , ’ „ . v ' : 

TESLA stated that this new type of force would ' 
1 operate through a beam one hundredth millionth of a _ - - , 

; Square c centime tef in diameter and could bO 

- ; generated from a special plant that Would cost no. more 
7 than two million dollars and would take only about three ■. 

_ months to castruct. TESLA stated that a dzen such 
plants located at strategic points along the coast, 

• r . according to 2?2StA> would be enough to’" defend the 

. . United States against all possible aerial attacks* - ' -■ 

,1- TESLA' statci that this beam would molt any engine . \ - . 

- \ , and would also ignite ojg&osives aboard any- bomber^ 

TESLA stated that no possible defense against it could 1 
. be devised and he asserted that the. bean would be all 
. , penetrating. 


~ £ -* 


4 


J 




fix €5-12299 s - _ ' . 

j. ~ 

T2SLA stated to Mr, that h.e 

ndkea bno l^ortaht ^tipulation before howodld * - 
divulge this secret to the United States Government 
and that was that Should the united Stats doyoranent t 
decide to. take up hie deter/ lie 'would, go to work at 
Once hut that the 'united. Stated (favorhrent would have 
td trust him. TESLA stated that ho would suffer 
ho interference from experts. " r 

in this u iToTf York Tines 11 article Mr, LAWRENCE ' 
toenientcd that tilth conditions as they Wore In 19^0/ 
and with the United States getting ready to spend 
'pillions of dollars. JCor Rational, Defense/ Mr/ TESLA’S 
Great reputation asan inventor/ who always wad many - 
„ years ahead of his tine., should he given careful. . , u 
consideration* Sr, IAWHENCE fitted/ in Ms opinion/ 
the United States Government should take Mr. TESLA: 
at Mb Word and coamcsidn hin .to go ahead with the 
construction of his 1, toleforco ,( plant* 

■i - ' * 

The Seu York file of Mr* TESLA boars np- 
indication that any additional developments wore 
carried .on in connection tilth T2SA*n invention and 
Whether or not TESLA fully divulged his new plan 
to the Unit Od States .Government*" - ♦* " ; 

TESLA, died at the ace of* f>5 on January 7/ 19^3 

> / >lr. SAVO provided a two- pace -copy of the ' • - r 

above mentioned newsletter which llr*,\and lirs r STOBH* 'v , 
haye been distributing in connection With. the alleged 
invention by TESLA, which/ according to Hr* ad. 

. .Ik’S*. STorji, consists of a radio type, machine known as 
- the Tcfila S£t which tap invented by Hr. TESLA in 1938 
for interplanetary ccrraaication, Mr. and Mrs. STOluI 
Clain that TESLAts engineers did not complete the 
TeSla Set until, after TESLA* s death in 1S4$> Hr* and. 

Mrs* STORM clain that this Set was placed in opcfifcibn 
dir 1950 and since that time TESLA engineers halve been -■ 
in close touch. witht|ace slplps^ etc.; . 



SSie files of 'tits No*'? Yerh Office contained 
no pertinent ihf orrmtion resar dins any' Of tlio 
£eg yo nontLoned indifAchwileu ' 


TO photaStafcic copies of this. nctplettor 
are Tbeihs cent fo the £urcau for purposes of 
Information ;Mie one copy is "bains Suhsittid to 
the Xop Azoles Office for information purposes t 


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